The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 03.12.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 03.12.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 48 Keflavik. Iceland December 3. 1976 The custom of sending Christmas cards began in England back in 1843 when it was possible to send them to friends near and far for a pen- ny. Designed by John Cal- cott Horsely of the Roy- al Academy, the first card featured a friendly family party wine glasses in a toast, with simple greeting still used to- day: "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to You." raising by Phillip R. Smith, Jr. The Yule Custom that Grew into a 4-Billion Card Business Still Offers Simple CHRISTMAS CRftTINCS studio card with its hu- morous Santas and ludi- crous reindeer. Since that time the industry has grown phe- nomenally. In 1954, Americans exchanged more than two billion Christ- mas cards. This year, industry spokesmen esti- mate that about four billion cards will be exchanged. ^*m< : m Color Cards in U.S. The custom was introduced to the United States in the 1870s by Louis Prang of Boston, MA, an immigrant from Germany. Known as the "Father of the American Christmas Card," Prang perfected the lithographic pro- cess of multicolor printing, often using as many as 20 colors on one card. The reproduction of oil paint- ings, including many religious scenes was so perfect that at times only ex- perts could tell print from paint. By 1881 Prang was printing five mil- lion cards a year, most of them Christmas cards. Near the turn of the 20th century, a flood of plenty postcards made in Germany flooded the U.S. greeting card market, and from that time until the First World War, Germany monopo- lized the market. By 1920, however, American greeting card manufacturers were bringing out greeting cards of better quality and design. Patriotic Santas During World War II, Christmas cards featured Santas carrying flags. Special cards came out for Servicemen with such sentiments as "Across the Miles" and "Missing You". The Cold War years sharpened a demand for more humor in cards. This sparked the The custom is also follow- ed by royalty and heads of state. Not long after Christmas cards were in- troduced in Great Britain, the King and Queen and the Prince of Wales adopted the custom and em- The first Christmas Card, circa 1843 ployed distin- guished artists to paint an appropri- ate picture for each card. For a number of years the President and First Lady of the United States have also drawn upon the talents of dis- tinguished artists to deoigii special Christmas cards. 1M IS Intricate Process One might expect that the cards sent by such famous persons would in- volve far greater production effort than for those sent by the general public. Not so. Production experts at one large greeting card company say that as many as 3,000 people car- rying out some 300 separate steps pool their talents in producing a single Treated to look like wood, satin, cloth greeting card may pass more than 30 individual tests before final approv- al, and it may take as many as 95 working days to turn out a single card. That's something to think about when you affix your John Hancock, Mrs. Hancock and junior Hancocks to this year's batch of Christmas cards. And, as John Horsely said back in 1843, "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to You." conceiving and greeting card, leather, suede, and metal, a PW officer advises TV viewers to check first before calling 4601 The American Forces Television, Chan- nel 4 closed-circuit broadcast signed on Thanksgiving Day. Before signing on, viewers were advised how to "hook up" their TV sets to cable outlets and the necessary parts needed to receive the broadcast. But what does one do when the recep- tion is bad? According to Commander Delmont J. Monarch Jr., Naval Station Fublic Works officer, viewers should be aware that all problems with television sets do not necessarily stem from the TV cable. He said viewers should be aware that merely tuning to Channel 4 will not ensure a clear picture. The television trans- former must be hooked up to the VHF ter- ninals on the back of the set and the Let must be finely tuned. With the system now activated, color is available on all color sets but the viewer must adjust the color hues on his own set. The following are Cdr. Monarch's sug- gestions of probable troubles a viewer might encounter: Stemming from TV cable malfunctions: * Herring bone effect (uniform zig- zag lines covering screen); * Ghosts after fine tuning; * Aurora (halo around figures); * Cochannel (one-half vertical line moving constantly from left to right of TV screen); and * No picture on screen but screen lights up (indicates cut cable). Stemming from viewer's TV set: * No picture and screen does not light up (indicates faulty power tube, faulty on/off switch, unplugged set, circuit breaker tripped on back of set, circuit breaker tripped for that circuit at power panel); * Fine tuner has little or no effect on reception (faulty fine tuner, prob- ably needs cleaning; * Channel selector will not hold pic- ture on screen, but must be moved to an off-normal position to hold picture (faulty channel selector, cam or con- tacts shifted); * Volume control has little effect on lowered end of volume control knob (faulty volume potentiometer); and * Picture on screen shrinks on either horizontal or vertical scale (faulty horizontal tube or vertical tube). The commander also added that when the viewer is positive that the cable and not the set is causing the problem, he should call 4601 (TV cable trouble desk) not 4100 (Public Works trouble desk) as reported two weeks ago. Base wives to get 'first hand9 view of NavSta tennant commands To explain the missions of NATO Base tenant commands, a special Naval Station wives' orientation will be hosted by the Human Relations Center Tuesday, begin- ning at 9 a.m. at the Top of the Rock. Captain Jack T. Weir, Naval Station Commanding Officer/Commander Naval Forces Iceland, is scheduled to greet the Navy wives at the morning assembly. Reservations for the orientation tour and luncheon should be made by 1:30 p.m. Monday by calling 7334 or 7908 at the Human Relations Center. According to Ensign Tim Greer, pro- ject coordinator, a similar wives' orientation tour was held in June. The wives' indoctrination is part of the command action plan embodied in NAVSTA- KEFINST 5350.8A. The wives' tour agenda is as follows: 8:45-9 a.m.—assemble at Top of the Rock 9:15—Captain Jack T. Weir will greet and the film "Days of Destruction" will be shown during this orientation segment 10:15—Patrol Squadron FORTY-NINE will hold a hangar and aircraft brief/tour 11:00—Commander Fleet Air Keflavik will summarize their operational functions 11:30—Luncheon—Top of the Rock Club 1 p.m.—Air Force Detachment 14 will give a rescue operations demonstration 1:45—57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron will deliver an aircraft familiarization and show a movie for the Navy wives 2:30—Keflavik Airport Fire Station will demonstrate an actual arrested landing 3:15—The program will conclude at the Top of the Rock Club. About 40 Navy wives are expected to attend. CHAMPUS Deadline for 1975 claims nears The Department of Defense reminds beneficiaries that Dec. 31, 1976 is the deadline for submitting 1975 claims under the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS). Any claim for care received between Jan. 1, 1975 and Dec. 31, 1975 that is not submitted by the deadline cannot be paid. A CHAMPUS beneficiary with a 1975 claim that has not been submitted should get it in the mail as soon as possible. Also, if a civilian provider of medical care who agreed to submit a 1975 claim directly to CHAMPUS has not done so, the beneficiary should remind the provider about the deadline. According to DOD policy in effect since Jan. 1, 1974, the deadline for submitting a CHAMPUS claim is the last day of the calendar year following the calendar year in which a service or supply was provided. New contractors Beginning Jan. 1, 1977, new contrac- tors will process all claims for inpa- tient and outpatient care received in Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky and Missouri CHAMPUS beneficiaries. On that same date, a new contractor will begin processing CHAMPUS claims for inpatient care received in Pennsylvania. The new contractors and the addresses to which claims should be sent after Dec. 31 are: Connecticut—Blue Shield of Massa- chusetts, Inc., P.O. Box 2194, Boston, MA 02111. Delaware—Medical Service Association of Pennsylvania, Blue Shield Building, Box 65, Camp Hill, PA 17011. Indiana—Planning Research Corpora- tion, 7600 Old Springhouse Road, McLean, CFK Note spells out travel uniform regulation Navy and Marine Corps personnel on permanent change of station travel or temporary duty and leave travel on gov- ernment owned or operated aircraft will be required to wear appropriate uniform, according to COMFAIRKEF Note 4630 of Nov. 16, 1976. The appropriate uniform for Navy personnel is service dress blue with ribbons or winter blue with ribbons. Outer wear for winter blue is peacoat, reefer, overcoat or raincoat. Blue working jacket or foul weather jacket is not authorized. Personnel not complying with the regulation will be refused boarding on aircraft. The regulation is effective immediately. For destinations where the Foreign Clearance Guide prescribes civilian clothing, and when specifically request- ed by personnel utilizing the Environ- mental and Morale Leave Program, travel in appropriate civilian attire will be authorized. VA 22101. Kentucky—Planning Research Corpora- tion, 7600 Old Springhouse Road, McLean, VA 22101. Missouri—The Dlkewood Corporation, 1009 Bradbury Drive, S.E., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106. Pennsylvania—Medical Service Asso- ciation of Pennsylvania, Blue Shield Building, Box 65, Camp Hill, PA 17011. Medical Service Association of Penn- sylvania currently processes all CHAMPUS outpatient claims from Pennsylvania. The new contractors were selected on the basis of competitive bidding. Each submitted the best overall proposal for administering payments of CHAMPUS claims from the state for which its contract was awarded, according to Defense De>- partment officals. DOD officials have asked CHAMPUS beneficiaries to begin submitting claims to the new contractors after Dec. 31, 1976, even if the care was received before that date. Until then, claims should be sent to the current contra- tor. New overseas medical rates New reimbursement rates for overseas medical care provided by military treat- ment facilities to civilian employees of the United States and their dependents have been announced by the Department of Defense. The new rates will go into effect on April 1, 1977, except where a local union contract or an agreement with a foreign government that calls for the current rate is in effect. These con- tracts and agreements will be honored until their expiration. Non-U.S. citizens and their depen- dents will pay $168 per day for in- patient care, the same rate now paid by U.S. citizens and their dependents. The present rate for non-U.S. citizens is $5 per day. Each outpatient treatment, examina- tion, or consultation for either a U.S. citizen or non-U.S. citizen will cost $20. Currently, the cost for both citi- zens and non-citizens is $1 per visit overseas and $20 per visit in the U.S. The decision to increase overseas reimbursement rates was based on Con- gressional requirements for full cost recovery, increases in the cost of pro- viding medical care, changes in inter- national economic conditions and im- provement in the Federal Employee Bene- fits program. The rates are based on worldwide average costs. School performance set The A. T. Mahan School will present a Christmas music program Dec. 14 at the Andrews Theater at 7 p.m. The Elementary School chorus and the High School band will perform. The entire community is invited to attend.

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