The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 10.12.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 10.12.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 49 Keflavik. Iceland December 10. 1976 TO ELIMINATE POTENTIAL HAZARDS, two high school students sweep the rink. Skaters urged to keep rink clean For the convenience of skaters, a skating rink area has been designated this year, according to Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate Jack Eubanks. The skating rink area is located at the basketball court between A. T. Mahan High School and the Top of the Rock Club. Cooperation by base personnel and their dependents is needed to keep the base skating rink area free of debris. Chief Eubanks, gymnasium staff super- visor, states that "high school hires" sweep down the skating rink on a daily basis. Members of the NATO Base community are urged to help the staff keep the area clear of sticks and pop cans as well as rocks. For the safety of ice skaters, rocks are extracted from the ice—this ob- struction might cause a fall. No provision has been made, however, for first aid or telephone access in case of a skating accident. The rink area, pronounced safe struc- turally, measures about three inches thick at the deepest end when it's fully flooded. To build up the surface, the Naval Station Fire Department is scheduled to flood the rink in the near future. Security Dept. to impound abandoned vehicles Abandoned, unattended and inoperative vehicles are subject to impoundment and disposal by the Security Department if certain requirements are not met, ac- cording to Commander Naval Forces Ice- land/Naval Station Keflavik. Instruction 5560.2A. As set forth by the instruction, the Security Officer or Chief of Police may order the impounding of any vehicles left unattended on the roads of the Agreed Area, restricted area, or any- where except authorized parking areas for a period in excess of 96 hours, or at any time if parked vehicles consti- tute a hazard to traffic, emergency ve- hicles or snow removal equipment. It is the responsibility of individuals owning unattended vehicles on the Agreed Area to notify the Security Officer in person when their vehicles will be left un- attended for more than 96 hours. Inoperative vehicles and vehicles unable to pass the required safety ins- pections may be parked for a period not to exceed two months, by arrangement with the Security Officer, at locations adjacent to quarters occupied by the owners. These vehicles will not be parked on streets at any time. Inoperative and not currently regis- tered vehicles parked in any other area will be towed to the impounded vehicle compound. Impounded vehicles will be released to the owners upon presentation of evidence that corrective steps are being taken to have the vehicle meet the requirement. Such evidence must be presented at the Security Department. Vehicles not claimed by legal owner after two months will be disposed of by the Security Department. Inoperative, unregistered vehicles will not be kept on the Agreed Area or bought and sold on the Agreed Area be- tween Defense Force personnel without prior approval of the Security Officer. This is intended to discourage purchase of old, wrecked or worn out vehicles which might cause accidents, costly repairs or abandonment. NCFA announces new courses for Term III The Navy Campus for Achievement (NCFA) has announced the following course selections for Term III: University of 'laryland U of M will have Business Management 380—business law M/W, Economics 201— principles of economics M/W, English 101 —introduction to writing M/W, English 292—introduction to literary types T/TH, Government and Politics 170—Amer- ican government T/TH and Psychology 335 —personality and adjustment T/TH. L. A. Community College Overseas LACCO will offer Accounting 31— mathematics of accounting (business math) M/W, Administration of Justice 6— patrol procedures T/TH, Art 20—drawing 1 M/W, Auto Mechanics A3—automotive emission control systems T/TH and Biolo- gy 25—human biology T/TH. Also included are Business 10—funda- mentals of tax return preparation M/W, Developmental Communications 20—funda- mentals of communications I (study skills) M/W, Electronics 12—mathematics of electronics II T/TH, Electronics 20 and 21—electronic circuits I M/W/F and Finance 2—investments T/TH. Additionally, LACCO will schedule Management 65—restaurant and hotel en- vironmental control T/TH, Management 31—human relations for employees M/W, Photography 63—commercial photography M/W/F, Real Estate 18—real estate in- vestments T/TH, Secretarial Science 1— typewriting I M/W/TH, Secretarial Sci- ence 2—typewriting II M/W/TH and Super- vision 2—basic psychology for supervi- sors Wednesdays at AIMD. Classes will be held at the A. T. Mahan High School from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Jan. 10, ending March 4. Early registration will begin Monday and students may register throughout the holiday season—with final registration taking place Jan. 10-14. Term fliers vrith complete course descriptions are available at the "Navy Campus," located in Building 752. For specific information concerning these programs, call 7795 or 6226. NWSED stresses importance of wind speed in weather forecasts With the onset of winter, the chill index becomes an important facet of the weather forecast, according to Lieuten- ant Commander Jack J. Jensen, Naval Weather Service Environmental Detachment officer-in-charge. The index is based on the loss of heat by the human body, depending on temperature and wind speed, LCdr. Jensen added. By using the chill index, not only is body comfort determined but also possi- ble danger to exposed flesh as well as human life is indicated. Of five chill indexes, four are out- lined as follows: CHILL INDEX I—com- fortable with normal precautions; CHILL INDEX II—cold, travel becomes uncom- fortable, and CHILL INDEX III—bitterly cold, travel becomes uncomfortable, even on clear, sunny days. CHILL INDEX IV means that freezing of human flesh begins, depending upon degree of activity, amount of solar 17,000 accident-fr** mites radiation plus character of skin and circulation. Travel and life in tempo- rary shelters becomes disagreeable. Equivalent temperatures, relating to the chill indexes, are listed in addi- tion to the above categories: I, 20 de- grees: II -10 to 20; III, -30 and IV, -60. Generally, Keflavik is in CHILL INDEX II throughout the winter, occasionally going into CHILL INDEX III. CHILL INDEX IV does happen, but only rarely. The NWSED officer-in-charge stated that the most effective protection against these conditions is found in the clothing worn. Rather than a single, heavy garment, layers of winter wear are preferable be- cause added insulation is given to the wearer. To keep the body from sweating when outdoors for an extended time, garments may then be removed or nut on, varying with the degree of stress. 932nd cited for vehicle care Seventeen thousand accident - free on the part miles, driven with no incident of vehi- we are able cle abuse or misuse, has earned the and the veh 932nd Aircraft Control and Uarniuj* Squa- the drivers dron (ACWS), P.ockville, the Vehicle Man- own and th after of the Quarter Award. care.' Their The vehicle officer and non-commis- miral Karl sioned officers responsible for the a- "...The veh ward are Major David Spore, Technical possible an Serjeant Michael Carroll, and Senior as having Airman Mark Cop Ian. apparent th TSftt Carroll says, "Everyday we have cessful in the vehicles checked out before they arc 932nd on driven. Because of the j^ood cooperation care." of the personnel at the site to keep everyone informed icles maintained. I believe treat the vehicles as their award proves that they itation, signed by Rear Ad- J. Bernstein, reads in part, icles are always as clean as d have never been identified maintenance problems. It is at you have been highly sue- educating the drivers of the the importance of vehicle Spouses supply sqdn. surveillance On Nov. 22, Sloe Cin 51 took off fron Keflavik Naval Station on a tactical evaluation mission for Weapons System Officer Captain Patrick J. Gandee. Capt. Gandee is a member of the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and an F-4C crew- member . The Ground Intercept Controller for Sloe Gin 51 was Second Lieutenant Kathleen T. Gandee, a weapons controller for the 932nd Aircraft Control and Warn- ing Squadron. Captain and Lieutenant Gandee are a husband and wife tear, who have recently arrived in Iceland for a two-year tour. Their jobs are closely related, as they both are committed to the inter- ception of unidentified aircraft. Kathleen locates unknown targets and directs the interceptors to their tar- get. Pat operates the F-4C radar and takes control of the intercept prior to airborne identification of the unknown target. Kathleen's previous assignment was at McChord AFD, Washington. Pat was sta- tioned at Hclloman AFB, New Mexico. This current assignment is the first time they have worked together as Weap- ons Systems Officer and Weapons Control- ler. SECOND LIEUTENANT KATI.EEN T. GANDEE and her husband, Captain Patrick J. Gandee, check out some flieht information. (Photo by SN Bob Herskovitzi

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