The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 30.12.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 30.12.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 52 Kellavik, Iceland December 30, 1976 New Year's Superstitions by MSgt. J«IUa Mill* Is the average, down-to-earth, sensi- ble American superstitious? Probably not, in most instances. However, there is one day in the year when we find most Americans practicing an age-old super- stition—making New Year's resolutions. This tradition was instituted by the Romans who, by making sacrifices and practicing good conduct during January, hoped to please the god Janus and there- by make the rest of the year a lucky one. So, on Jan. 1, many of us will super- stitiously make our promises to be good and to sacrifice certain things which we hold dear, in hopes that our new year will be a prosperous one. We offer not to drink, smoke, curse, procrastinate, etc. By relinquishing certain endear- ments or oromising to undertake diffi- cult tasks, we hope that we will be looked upon with favor and blessed with a year's good luck. For most resolution makers, however, such sacrifices last no longer than .the month of January—if that long. The Romans superstitiously hallowed the first month of the year to bring them good luck, and perhaps if modern-day resolution makers can hold out for the first month, they will receive whatever good luck the Romans hoped for. There appears to be quite an interest in an old Anglo-Saxon New Year's tradi- tion, as well--that of drinking a toast to one another's health. The ancient Anglo-Saxons celebrated the New Year by drinking Wassail, which means "to be well." They drank the Wassail to wish the other person health and prosperity in the coming year. Most New Year's Eve gatherings find this ancient practice very much alive. At the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve we implement another age-old tradition. Probably, most of us don't even think of it as superstitious when we ring the bells and bring out the noisemakers. But one ancient custom allows for driving out the evils of the old year with bells, horns and other noisemakers, so that the new year can be ushered in with good possibilities. Superstitions aside, our good or bad luck is often a result of our good or bad judgments-. Establishing the prac- tice of making well-thought-out deci- sions will usually ring out the possibi- lity of negative consequences. And that's a resolution worth toasting what- ever the time of year! Bonfire set for N ew Year's Eve To drive away evil spirits, the New Year's Eve Bonfire will be lit at 10 p.m. tomorrow. The bonfire will be staged directly east of Quarters 960 (see map). All Naval Station departments are requested to divert their burnable wood- en refuse to the bonfire area. The station Fire Department will su- pervise the bonfire and the Naval Sta- 'tion Security Department will direct traffic and maintain order among spec- tators. | y. 1 Bonfire area jC- 1\ fEnTistep ™/ {Housing} D ' Woodpeckers leave; Pelicans arrive Top of the Rock Club Patrol Squadron FORTY-FIVE has arriv- ed, relieving Patrol Squadron FORTY-NINE of its deployment at Keflavik. Commanded by Commander Stephen F. Loftus, VP-45 has a manpower complement of about 75 officers and 302 enlisted personnel. The squadron, which flies the P3-C "Orion", is known as the "Pelicans" and will be deployed with Commander Fleet Air Keflavik for five and a half months. The Forty-niners return to Naval Air Station Jacksonville, FL, with a tour at Keflavik, marked by numerous accomplish- ments in antisubmarine warfare opera- tions while deployed in the "Land of Frost and Fire." Flying more than 290 operational mis- sions, accumulating more than 2,450 operational hours and flying more than 800 training hours, the Woodpeckers per- formed with the highest degree of pro- fessionalism and pride, earning acco- lades from Commander Patrol Wings Atlan- tic and Commander Naval Air Forces At- lantic and the Secretary of the Navy while in Iceland. Despite the hardships of deployment and the squadron's demanding operational schedule, the Woodpeckers have pursued several programs to improve community and international relations. VP-49 has sponsored several aircraft tours for civic organizations, press correspondents and school children. In addition, the squadron has hosted more than 30 foreign aircrews and has reciprocated by visiting Norway, Great Britain and the Netherlands. By request of the Norwegian embassy, the Woodpeckers regularly "bombed" Jan Mayen Island with mail-stuffed sonobuoy containers because this is the only way the isolated communications outpost can receive its letters from home. Together with routine ASW and sur- veillance, VP-49 participated in one of the largest NATO operations ever held— "Teamwork 76" in September. During the two-week exercise, the Orions flew around the clock, supporting the armada of ships, planes and sub- marines which formed in the North Atlan- tic. Each Woodpecker crew integrated it- self into the extensive and complex operation, which was effected by pro- longed and detailed training programs established within the squadron. On behalf of the Secretary of the Navy, Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force, pre- sented the squadron with a Meritorious Unit Commendation for its participation in Mediterranean exercises in June and July 1975, when the Woodpeckers were de- ployed to Sigonella, Sicily. VP-49 received the first annual "Top Gunner Award" from Commander Patrol Wing ELEVEN. Safety and skill go hand in hand in VP-49. While in Iceland, the Woodpeck- ers surpassed 110,000 accident-free hours. The aircrews and ground person- nel worked constantly—icy runways and 50 knot winds were common occurrences. In Keflavik sports competition, the Woodpeckers took first place in the Kef- lavik Olympics, more than doubling the point total of the second place finish- er. The VP-49 basketball team won the pre-season tournament and the football squad finished second in the post-season tournament. The Woodpecker polo team captured the Icelandic Polo Association title. The last of -he ',,'oodpeckers is leav- ing today for its homebase—Jackson- ville. NavSta GO announces Midnight Sun shutdown The Midnight Sun enlisted club will close at the end of business tomorrow (Friday, Dec. 31st). Coincident with that closing, the membership privileges will be changed at the Chief Petty Offi- cers' Club and the Top of the Rock. This decision was announced yesterday by Captain Jack T. Weir, Commander, Na- val Forces Iceland/Commanding Officer, Naval Station, Keflavik, who stated: "When I assumed command in September, one of my first concerns was the NATO Base club system. Consequently, I or- dered a major review of all clubs to be- gin on Oct. 1." The captain ordered a review commit- tee to consider the material condition of all clubs, ongoing rennovation pro- jects, their profit/loss, their indivi- dual organization, service provided and the membership and guest rules. The com- mittee included the station Executive Officer, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Command, club managers, advisory board chairmen of all the clubs and oth- er service representatives. As a result of the committee findings the decision to close the Midnight Sun was made. "We discovered that the Midnight Sun was losing approximately $3,000 a month despite a concerted effort by Lieuten- ant James Cote (Navy Exchange Officer) and his club management personnel to up- grade service and entertainment. The Chief Petty Officers' Club has also had financial difficulties,"the captain con- tinued. Once the decision was made to close the junior enlisted club, additional ac- tions were required because the Top of the Rock cannot accommodate all person- nel E-l through E-6. It was, therefore determined that membership rules for the CPO Club would be changed to include all E-6 and above, and that rules for the Top of the Rock would be changed to in- clude all E-5 and below. A naval station notice (NAVSTAKEFNOTE 1741) will be issued today to formally announce these changes. There will also be a naval station instruction (NAVSTA- KEFINST 1746.SB) published to outline club guest privileges. Another step in this major club reor- ganization will be the issuance of club membership cards. This will be done to help ensure club privileges are protec- ted. The cards will be color coded and serialized and will control admittance and guest privileges for all the base clubs. The cards are expected to be is- sued by mid-January. There is no plan to charge club dues. In response to a question about what will happen to the space presently used by the Midnight Sun, the captain stated that several proposals are being discus- sed. However, a formal decision will not be made until late January. During the past several months, there has been much discussion about club or- ganization in general. Last spring, the Chief of Naval Operations ordered all Navy-operated clubs to be transferred from the Navy Exchange to the Bureau of Naval Personnel. The Midnight Sun and the Top of the Rock are both currently operated by the Navy Exchange. The CNO also expressed his concern as one of his major objectives by ordering "...the reexamination of the entire con- cept of morale, welfare and recreation programs...to determine the most cost- beneficial approach...." Captain Weir emphasized, however,that the club review done onboard the naval station would have been done regardless of Navy Department plans. "We knew we had some problems and we had to do some- thing about them," stated Capt. Weir. Once the three NATO base clubs have been operating for a period of time, the review committee will again look for ad- ditional possible improvements. "Our re- view of the clubs, as with all other mo- rale enhancing functions will be an on- going thing," the captain continued. "We won't be content until we have a top notch operation that provides the best possible service to all hands onboard the naval station."

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