The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 14.01.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 14.01.1977, Blaðsíða 1
C White Falcon Volume XXXIII Number 2 Kellavik, Iceland January 14. 1977 AMN ROSEMARIE THOMAS replaces a cover over an aircraft part that she has just inspected. LCPL. STANLEY NICKLYN studies his aim for a corner pocket shot. AG! TERRY LATHAM charts the movement of a frontal system from a satellite pic- ture onto a weather map. VP- 45 flies baby to Bethesda The Patrol Squadron FORTY-FIVE " Pel- icans" conducted a mission of mercy last week by flying a medical evacuation to Andrews Air Force Base, MD for a 3 1/2 week old girl who needed the special coronary care facilities at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Washington, D.C. VP-45 Crew One, led by Lieutenant Commander Paul Dykeman, was the alert £rew on duty when the decision was made evacuate the child from Iceland. No- [fied in advance, the P-3C "Orion" s^aadron alerted its air frames and electronics shops to prepare the air- craft for the 3 by 2 foot incubator in which the baby girl would travel to the Stateside hospital. Lieutenant Commander Bruce MacHaffie and Lieutenant junior grade Diane Knope of the Navy Medical Corps, along with the parents and a corpsman, flew more than 2,500 miles to Andrews in eight hours. The mission experienced 100 mile per hour headwinds which slowed the flight, according to Crew One Navigator Lieuten- ant Dave Hoffmann. A U.S. Air Force helicopter,.waiting for the Orion at Andrews, took the in- fant and parents to the hospital. Doctor MacHaffie reported that the infant's condition improved during the flight and that further observation and tests would determine the need for an operation. IDF lauds 5 enlisteds by J02 Terry Barnthouse It's been another day. For some, the day was just another mark on the calen- dar and, for others, it was the earning of another dollar. Yet, for a chosen few-their dedication to duty has been recognized. This "special" group is composed Oi a flightline mechanic, weather forecaster, security supervisor, a sports enthusiast and sentry guard. Varied backgrounds, different job specialties and unrelated interests-yet these same five have some- thing in common. They are the Service- members of the Quarter. Monday afternoon, in the office of Rear Admiral K. J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force, they gathered and received their earned and deserved praise. Each was presented a letter of commendation, a personalized, wooden Iceland-shaped plaque and a priority three on an environmental and morale flight to continental Europe. Let's meet these chosen few and see why they were chosen for their awards. The busy click-clack of teletype machines seemed to buzz in the distance, but the goateed man didn't notice or perhaps, he was so accustomed to the sound of the machines that the noise meant all was going well. Placing an overlay on a map of Ice- land, he begins scaling the chart and marking in millibar codes and symbols that look like musical notes. After referring to other charts, and combining information received from the teletype service, he composes his meteorological symphony. Without looking out a window, this man can tell you what the weather is like. He is a trained and experienced duty weather forecaster at the Naval Weather Service Environmental Detach- ment, NWS ED. Aerographer's Mate First Class Terry Latham, Petty Officer of the Quarter, says, "Only now, at the end of my year's tour here, am I getting confident with forecasting Iceland's weather." Petty Officer Latham works with Ice- landic meteorologists in analyzing wea- ther conditions and sending out fore- casts. They must come to complete agreement before releasing the important and informative material. He adds, "If a person can forecast weather accurate- ly here, he can forecast weather any- where. " Quick to involve himself in projects, Petty Officer Latham has organized sur- prise birthday parties for unaccompanied staff members and the staff Christmas party. He also set up the NWSED booths at the NATO Community Day and PTO carni- val. He devoted untotaled hours in tutoring and counseling others to estab- lish a closer bond of friendship with NWSED personnel. In addition, he en- rolled in two college courses, conver- sational Icelandic and creative writing. The native of Crystal Lake, IL, will soon be stationed in England, where his wife and children now live. The air was stuffy, but the atmos- phere was alive, and shouts from op- posing teams could be heard. On the basketball court, lined under the basket for a free throw shot, a ball player wipes his hand across his forehead to brush away perspiration. The foul he had committed was avoid- able, he'd play better position the next time. Now his concentration was on the bas- ketball. This husky, red-clad man is a year- round sports enthusiast. Corporal Colin Yorke, Marine non-commissioned officer of the Quarter, has participated in. Softball, basketball, football and 1976 Bicentennial run as well as been a member of the Marine Color Guard and Drill Team. The sentry guard, who in- structs Ground Defense Force members on gun handling and cleaning, received the Marine of the Month Award in February 1976. In another area of the gym, a man who is sweating from lifting weights, takes a breather before continuing his muscle- toning exercises. Lance Corporal Stan- lev Nicklyn, Marine of the Quarter, en- joys keeping in shape by lifting weights and hiking. "It's the little things that happen that make time go by fast, like snowball fights. But, most of the time, after standing guard duty and work details in the barracks, I'll min- gle with the guys, shoot an occasional game of pool or sit and read a book." The native of Bridgeport, MI, has been stationed at Keflavik since May, 1976. Bundled in Air Force green fatigues and wearing a face guard for protection from the wind, the flightline crewman readies an F-4 flight. The checklist includes an interphone check, plus a lock and strap check for the pilots. After the flight, it is the crewman's responsibility to obtain oil samples, refold the drag shoot and refuel the aircraft. Until the airman pulls the uniform cover from her head and shakes her hair loosely, one is unable to notice this crew member is a woman in the Air Force. "It's the closest thing to flying without doing the real thing," says Airman Rosemarie Thomas, Airman of the Quarter, who doesn't mind getting her hands dirty with hydraulic lubricant. (continued on page 2) photos by PH3 Rono Pemrco SSGT. HACK DAVIS JR. transmits a message from an AFI security vehicle to a se- curity dispatcher. CPL. COLIN YORKE make a defensive mo ball game. Ho. 11, prepares to ve during a basket-

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