The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 18.02.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 18.02.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXIII Number 7 Keflavik, Iceland February 18, 1977 Firemen install smoke detectors FOR HIS SEPTEMBER 5-level Maintenance of the Month, Staff Sergeant Michael A. Austin prepares to take a T-33A flight last week. Pilot Cap- tain Scott Stephens flew a one hour sortie over the Arctic Circle, quali- fying the Organizational Maintenance Branch crew chief as a "Bluenose." Cable TV problems reviewed According to the Telephone Mainten- ance Office, some closed-circuit broad- casting system problems which may arise might include results such as "snow," poor sound reception or even no picture at all. In these instances, however, it is a good idea to check with a neighbor to see if he has been encountering the same difficulties. A telephone maintenance spokesman suggests that users might try hooking up their set to a neighbor's cable—this action might prove that the problem lies within one's own set. The White Falcon published a story in December, 1976, concerning probable troubles which a viewer might have with his reception. Naval Station Public Works Officer Commander Delmont J. Monarch reported several causes which stem from cable television malfunctions: *Herring bone effect (uniform zig-zag lines covering screen); *Ghosts after fine tuning; *Aurora (halo around figures); *Cochannel (one-half vertical line moving constantly from left to right of TV screen); and *No picture on screen but screen lights up (indicates cut cable). Problems from the viewer's television set may include: *No picture and screen does not light up (indicates faulty power tube, faulty on/off switch, unplugged set, circuit breaker tripped on back of set or cir- cuit breaker tripped for that circuit at power panel); *Fine tuner has little or no effect on reception (faulty fine tuner, prob- ably needs cleaning; ?Channel selector will not hold pic- ture on screen, but must be moved to an off-normal position to hold picture (faulty channel selector, cam or con- tacts shifted); *Volume control has little effect on lowered end of volume control knob (faulty volume potentiometer); and ?Picture on screen shrinks on either horizontal or vertical scale (faulty horizontal tube or vertical tube). When the viewer is positive that the cable is causing the problem rather than the set—he should call 4601 (TV cable trouble desk), the commander stated.* CHAM PUS details handicapped plan The transient life of the military family often becomes a hardship when a member of the family is handicapped. Because they can't meet local resi- dency requirements, the families of ac- tive duty members may be eligible for state-sponsored programs providing care for the handicapped. Here's where CHAM- PUS comes in. The CHAMPUS program for the handi- capped is extended to spouses and child- ren of active duty personnel. It al6o extends"to families of deceased military "personnel who die, while eligible for hostile fire pay, or who die from a disease or injury incurred while eligible for such pay. Members of your family are eligible for the program if they have a serious handicap or are mentally retarded to a degree that is considered moderate or severe. Surviving spouses and children of eligible servicemen or women may con- tinue to receive benefits they were re- ceiving at the time of the member's death, up to age 21. Among the benefits which may be au- thorized are diagnostic services; in- patient treatment; outpatient treatment; rehabilitation, training, and special education; institutional care; and cer- tain transportation costs. All benefits under this program, ex- cept initial diagnostic services, must be approved by the Director of OCHAMPUS, Denver, CO 80240, before the services are received. To obtain approval, fill out CHAMPUS Form 190 (Request for Health Installation of smoke detectors in base housing units began Monday, and will continue through March. The smoke detectors, or early warning smoke and fire alarms as they are call- ed, are more scientifically advanced than the ordinary smoke warning devices. Benefits Under the Program for the Hand- icapped) and send it to the director. The form can usually be obtained from a CHAMPUS advisor, from the doctor who or- ders the care or from the person/insti- tution that will provide the care if it is approved. You canalso request the form from OCHAMPUS, Denver, CO 89240. Claims will not be considered unless prior approval of the care is obtained. The CHAMPUS program is on a cost-share basis. You pay the initial amount of the costs each month—payment based on your pay grade. CHAMPUS will then pay up to $350 per month for authorized care. Any additional amount is the re- sponsibility of the sponsor. When the monthly costs are less than the spon- sor's share, CHAMPUS does not pay at all. CHAMPUS will share the cost of care from a non-profit private facility only when an appropriate public official is- sues a statement that no public facility is available or no available public pro- gram can provide the required care. When a handicapped beneficiary moves to a different area, a new statement must be obtained from an official in that area. Since a move usually means a change of doctors, the beneficiary's sponsor will also have to reapply for acceptance into the program. CHAMPUS will not share the costs of a private institution operated for pro- fit. CHAMPUS shares the cost of trans- portation to and from private institu- tions that are operated for profit. TO PROVIDE ADDED fire protection in base housing, Fireman Halldor Vilhjalsson in- stalls a new smoke detector. (photo by PH3 Rene Pearce) According to the National Fire Pro- tection Association, 87 per cent more protection is rendered by the smoke detectors. The detectors supply additional fire safety because usually poisonous gases and smoke rather than fire are the killers—80 per cent of all fire deaths result from asphyxiation. Unlike electric eye smoke detection systems, the new smoke detectors sense smoke by an ionization process; instead the former could only "see" in lieu of "smell." Thus, the smoke detectors which are battery-powered, operated by solid state circuitry and guaranteed by a one year warranty may even be tested by an occupant. A weekly test is suggested which merely requires producing smoke near the device. However, the smoke detectors will not activate by ordinary cigarette smoking. By the same token, the detectors will not go off when gasoline is used for cleaning purposes. Rescue teams installed the detec- tors with a twofold purpose: to in- crease the safety of families and to familiarize themselves with housing structures, which will enable them to enter more quickly and efficiently in case of fire. Deputy Fire Chief Haraldur Stefansson reminds housing occupants, "Remember Operation EDITH (Exit Drill in the Home) —when you hear the smoke detector or smell smoke, then put your home escape plan into action." AFI Enlisted Advisory Council explained Communication is what Enlisted Ad- visory Councils are all about. Ac- cording to the Air Forces Iceland council, problems and insights should be brought out into the open, and aired before they reach any magni- tude. Further, the council initiates projects that improve the facilities, working situations, living condi- tions and general morale of the Air Force personnel which they represent. Members of the Air Forces Iceland Enlisted Advisory Council serve as eyes and ears of personnel whom they represent to the commander. However, to fulfill this function, the coun- cil announces its representatives for Air Forces Iceland. In the 932nd Aircraft and Warning Squadron, the council members are Technical Sergeant George B. Wallace, Staff Sergeant Robert Gingo and Sergeant Michael Spangler. TSgt. Wallace TSgt. Wallace is probably one of the most popular men at the Rockvllle site—he is the Food Service Section noncommissioned officer in charge, ac- cording to a council spokesman. TSgt. Wallace feels that morale is directly related to the quality of the food one gets, and he tries to have a variety of good food. As NCOIC, he has many duties other than cooking. He supervises ci- vilian and military employees through- out daily operations, devises menus and maintains records for forwarding to the Air Defense Command. In addition, he chairs the administrative management committee; he also participates in the University of Maryland on-base education program, and has obtained an associr ate's degree. Sgt. Spangler The third member of the team, Sgt. Spangler, is a radar operator. In this job, he is tasked with early warning and detection of aircraft, coming into the Icelandic Zone. Sitting for hours, watching his radar scope, or plotting the status boards—he thinks that some- thing should be done about boredom, both on and off the job. He invites any sug- gestions in this area. He says that people-oriented projects are his idea for the best solution to this problem. These three members are readily ac- cessible among the operating sections. So, if AFI personnel think that they have no contact with their commanders, see one of these men, and watch what happens. Classified ad deadline The deadline for the classified ads will be Tuesday at noon because of George Washington's Birthday Holi- day. SSgt. Gingo As the site communications supervis- or, SSgt. Gingo is responsible for all AFI telephone communications. He in- vites anyone to make complaints and compliments to him. He wants everyone to know if a problem exists someone cares, and, if he can't resolve a pro- blem locally, he can go to the right people and get it solved. In his off duty time, SSgt. Gingo teaches a photo- graphy course for Los Angeles Community College. Green flow to play NATO Base circuit The Department of Defense Showcase "Greenflow," a musical variety show, is scheduled to perform at the NATO Base Monday through Wednesday. Featuring folk rock and pop numbers, the eight-member group is composed of five men and three women. The musical troupe is slated to play as follows: Monday 2 p.m.—Andrews Theater 7 p.m.—Andrews Theater Tuesday 2 p.m.—Grindavik 8:30 p.m.—Rockville Wednesday 10 a.m.—depart for H-3 5 p.m.—return from H-3 AFTV programming AFTV Channel 4 will sign on at 9 .m. Monday with holiday programming.

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