The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 01.04.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 01.04.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXIII Number 13 Keflavik. Iceland April I. 1977 AFA begins membership drive The Air Force Association begins its annual membership drive today. AFA is a national nonprofit organiza- tion with no personal, political or com- mercial interests. It publishes AIR FORCE Magazine, the largest aerospace magazine in the free world, and current- ly has more than 150,000 members, in- cluding both active duty and civilian personnel. AFA affiliation is open to all U.S. citizens. Dues are $10 per year or $24 for a three-year period. In its recent Policy Statement on People, AFA strongly affirms support of "people programs" for the Air Force pro- fessional, be he in uniform or in a civ- ilian capacity, at every level and of every rank. Pointing out that "the surest way to make the volunteer force (concept) work is by enhancing the values of the pro- fessional military career," the state- ment criticized those who would "chip away, deride, distort and legislate against benefits provided to service- men." It concludes by saying that the men and women of all armed services have "never needed help more urgently, (and) they will get it from the Air Force As- sociation to the fullest extent of our abilities, our resources, and our ener- gies." Representatives for each agency and unit at Naval Station Keflavik are cur- rently contacting all military and civ- ilian personnel assigned. Applications for membership are available at the 57th Fighter Intercep- tor Squadron Headquarters and the 932nd Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron or may be obtained from the following: Captain Pat Gandee, 57th FIS, Captain J.H. Harris, AFI, Captain R.H. Andreiu, Det. 1, Captain J.H. Dubois, AFI Supply, Lieutenant Watts, Det. 14, and Master Sergeant Young, 57th FIS. Dispensary issues rate guide The Naval Station Dispensary announ- ces the following guidelines received from the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The guidelines provide information on reimburseable rates for medical care for |civilian employees and their dependents: 1. Out-patient visits, resulting from a recent in-patient hospital stay are not chargeable if ordered by a med- ical officer. Visits not ordered by a physician will'be chargeable. 2. Out-patient visits, unrelated to a recent in-patient hospitalization, are chargeable such as all pre-natal visits and six week' post-partum check. 3. Long term chronic conditions are chargeable for the first visit. Follow- up care ordered by a medical officer is not usually chargeable. 4. Allergy patients will be charged at the regular immunization rate unless a new condition arises which necessi- tates further evaluation. 5. Cast changes: Cast "checks" are nonchargeable visits, however, cast "changes" after an extended period of time will usually be chargeable. 6. Prescription refills will be non- chargeable visits provided it is not necessary for a physician to reevaluate the patient. 7. Return visits for weight control or blood pressure checks are not charge- able. 8. All appointments with physicians are chargeable as are visits to the Em- ergency Room when definitive treatment is rendered. This information is provided as a summary only. Detailed information may be obtained at the hospital in the Med- ical Administrative Office or from the Hospital Administrative Officer. FROM WITHIN, the inner man rests in serene places such as the sitting room, (above) back porch, (below) or out behind the barn (right), (photos by ATCS Larry D. Sutherland) ofrn r ** **»——-¦ ^^^^^K* Seder meal set Thursday The Catholic Community will partici- pate in a Community Celebration of the Seder Thursday at the Glacier Hut at 5:30 p.m. The Seder will be combined with a potluck, and each family is asked to bring a vegetable dish. The meat will be provided as well as the wine and matzah. For additional information con- tact Father Spilka or Father Higgins at the Chaplains' Office or call 4111 or 6206. The Seder Meal The ritual meal which commemorates the events of the Exodus is called the Seder. The primary aim of the Seder is to transmit to future generations the story of the Exodus, the central event in Jew- ish history. .Ideally, a family gathers around a table in the home to celebrate the Seder, sharing in a meal which symbol- izes their consciousness as a people and their faith in the future. The Exodus story pertains to all per- sons since it tells of the right of all persons to be free. Passover Passover is the great Jewish feast of redemption and liberation, the memorial of the Israelites' deliverance from their bondage in Egypt. In the story of the Exodus, Yahweh "passed over" the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt. Passover is also known as the feast of the Unleavened Bread since, in their haste to flee Egypt, "the people carried off their dough, still unleavened" (Ex. 12:34). The lamb offered at each Passover meal recalls the first Passover sacri- fice. Its blood protected the Israel- ites from the avenging angel of Yahweh (Ex. 12:21-33). Passover is a festival of great re- joicing, which reveals how God "led us from captivity to freedom, from sadness to joy, from mourning to feasting, from servitude to redemption, from darkness to brilliant light." Celebrating Heritage In the Christian tradition, the Pass- over Seder is also believed to be when Jesus instituted the Eucharist. Gathered around the supper table with His disciples, Jesus told them "I have longed to eat this Passover with you be- fore I suffer; because I tell you, I shall not eat it again until it is ful- filled in the kingdom of God." Then, taking a cup, He gave thanks and said, 'Take this and share it among you, because from now on, I tell you, I shall not drink wine until the kingdom of God comes' Then He took some bread, and when He had given thanks, broke it and gave it to them, saying 'This is my body which will be given for you; do this as a memorial of Me.' He did the same with the cup after supper, and said 'This cup is the new covenant in my blood which will be poured out for you.' (Lk 22:15-20) The Christian observance of this ritual meal celebrates not only the tra- dition of Christ's last supper but also the Jewish heritage which provided the context for Jesus' institution at the last supper. According to the Recreation Depart- ment, some new additions have been made to the Hvitarbakki recreational facili- ty which opens today. The Navy-leased lodge has purchased four horses, and delivery is expected later this week. A total of six are tentatively expected. A horseback riding program will be established at a later date. The site's barn is also available for children's recreation. It will be renovated in the future as an indoor playground. Playground equipment is on order, and is expected to arrive in August or September. The lodge kitchen is being remodeled. Dishes, pots and pans and a baby crib are available for family use. Fishing is free at the Hvita River at lodge. opens today Reservations must De made in person at the Recreation Main Office in Bldg. T-170. Located in the Borgarfjodur farming district about 100 miles northeast of Keflavik, the area is one of the most attractive valleys in Iceland. Ice- landers find it popular resort place. The facility, an eight bedroom unit, features a sitting room, downstairs lounge, a sauna bath and a spacious kitchen for guest use. Several hundred campers also may use the adjacent campground, and share house functions. In the fall, goose and duck hunt- ing may be done in about 2,000 acres. Across the valley is an outdoor swimming pool, fed by nearby hot springs. (continued on page 3) ¦-•.JV^TV*"1^ «!«»••:' ."J^P/ - mi-

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.