The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 29.04.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 29.04.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXIII Number 17 Keflavik. Iceland April 29, 1977 Bank gets accounting machines ATTAINING 106 PER CENT, Air Forces Iceland collected $2,597.32 in the Air Force Assistance Fund drive. Colonel W. E. Lindeman, AFI commander, and Captain Guy D. Ogan, campaign officer, explain how the goal was reached. 'ComPatWing ELEVEN visits Kef. Commodore C. 0. Prindie, Commander Patrol Wing Eleven visited Patrol Squa- dron FORTY-FIVE last week. Accompanying him in the inspection was Commander W. T. Pendley, Patrol Wing 11 operations officer, the former VP-45 Commanding Officer. The commodore and Cdr. Pendley held a preliminary administrative inspection of the squadron's career counseling, retention, human goals and personnel procedures. Upon his arrival, the commodore dined with Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force. The next day Commodore Prindle addressed the Pelicans at morning quarters and reviewed with them three key points which he stated to the squadron when he visited it in December, before its deployment to Keflavik. At that time, he called upon the squadron to be operationally ready, be good diplomats in uniform and to have a safe deployment. With deployment almost ended, the commodore commended VP-45 on its ex- cellent safety record as well as the exemplary conduct displayed by the Pelicans. Lastly, he directed his appreciation for the outstanding operational results achieved by VP-45. He especially commended VP-45 on its achievements in ! REACHING A NEW HIGH, Icelandic workmen raise a new point toward the upward way: at the NATO Base Chapel, (photo by PH2 Rene' Pearce) computerized telecommunications, which serve as an example to all P-3C squadrons. The highlight of the commodore's visit and the most popular aspect of his stay in Keflavik were the numerous person-to-person meetings with squadron personnel. He was hosted by VP-45 chief petty officers at their lounge, the "Barrel," where he conducted a round-table dis- cussion. He referred to a renewed em- phasis on retention as well as the excellent maintenance record achieved by the VP-45 maintenance department. The VP-45 maintenance men supported nine additional P-3s temporarily assigned to Keflavik during the commodore's visit. VP-45 has nine P-3s of its own. The commodore also reenlisted the first woman ever assigned to an Atlantic Fleet operational VP squadron, Personnel- man Third Class Denise Galligan. When Petty Officer Galligan graduated from Personnelman "A" School and re- ceived orders to VP-45, she had no idea what "VP" meant. One can imagine her surprise when she reported aboard the all male squadron in March of 1975. PN3 Galligan soon became just another Pelican as she served her time in the first lieutenant division like all new personnelman assigned to VP-45. She adjusted quickly and soon found herself packing for her first overseas deploy- ment to Sigonella, Sicily. While on deployment, she fulfilled one of her ambitions in joining the Navy, travel. She journeyed to Weisbaden and Munich, Germany as well as Naples, Italy. While deployed to Keflavik, she has vi- sited London, England. Petty Officer Galligan chose Commo- dore Prindle's visit to reenlist for . four years. Denise said she is dis- appointed at not being able to complete her sea duty. She feels women have a place in the Navy serving their country. "Women are always criticized for taking shore duty billets away from men. But I tried to serve a full sea tour," said Denise. Plans are under study to develop a test program of female assign- ments to VP squadrons. VP-45 is not to be one of the designated test squadrons. However, Petty Officer Galligan is happy with her orders to VP-30. She likes the Jacksonville area. The commodore flew a mission aboard one of the Pelican aircraft. It was his first operational patrol in six years. Royal Air Force First Lieutenant Bob Hall, Tactical Coordinator and mission commander, said the commodore made the take off and landing and spent about half the flight in the pilot's seat. During the other half of the flight, he discussed operational and technical aspects of the deployment with crew members. The American Express Bank con- tinues to make significant improve- ments to banking service, according to Commander B. E. Maxon, Naval Sta- tion Comptroller and Military Banking Facility Liaison Officer. The bank has obtained accounting machines which will allow for more efficient, error-free and timely re- ceipt of bank statements and balances. In a White Falcon story published October 29, 1976, the three biggest problems the local American Express Bank had were inconvenient banking hours, bank account errors-, and late receipt of statements. These con- clusions were drawn from a base-wide survey taken in September. Ralph Hutchinson, bank manager, ad- vises that bank hours were revised and that they have worked well for both the bank and its customers. The new bank hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2:30 to 4 p.m. To overcome the bank account error and late receipt of statements problem, American Express International Banking Corporation has provided new accounting machines, which, according to Mr. Hutch- inson, will enable the bank to keep the right balance, avoiding the time lag to have accounting done in London and bal- ances produced on statements prepared in Germany, which has been the system to date. wmum Ralph Hutchinson, Military Banking Fa- cility American Express IBC Manager, in- spects new accounting machine. For this reason, statements will be available and distributed within one week of balance closing instead of the three to four weeks' delay presently experienced. Further, Mr. Hutchinson assures that all records will be at the bank and available for customer inspection* Another important asset will be that checks and deposits will no longer be passed through foreign organizations previously necessary to process the items through the computer. This will drastically reduce the possibility of statement errors, Hutchinson says. American Express trained accounting machine operators in April, according to Mr. Hutchinson. He states that accounts were transitioned to the new machines effective last week. Transition of savings accounts to the new machines will be delayed until the end of the month to ensure that any interest due can be properly calculated and that no account holders lose any money due them. Mr. Hutchinson further says that in April the checking account holders can expect to receive their regular state- ments dated April 7, plus another state- ment covering the period from April 8 to April 21. Therefore, clients will begin to re- ceive statements prepared by the bank's new accounting machines within one week after the cutoff date, the seventh of each month thereafter. Another improvement which customers can now expect involves the availability of foreign currency. During the past six months, several customers have com- plained to the Bank Liaison Officer that foreign currency is not available when they need it. Attempts have been made to encourage customers to order specific amounts of foreign currency at least 48 hours before picking it up. However, for some cus- tomers, this is sometimes not possible. Therefore, Cdr. Maxon and Mr. Hutchinson plan foreign currency requirements based on the C-118 R and R flight schedule. Customers are still encouraged, however, to place their orders with the bank ahead of time if at all possible. Mr. Hutchinson stated, that the bank is limited on the amount of foreign currency it is able to procure from the Icelandic banks and some shortages will still exist. Both Cdr. Maxon and Mr. Hutchinson state that these improvements, though significant, are only representative of the service improvements which customers can continue to expect. Both men en- courage NATO Base patrons to communicate directly on problems or suggestions for service improvements. Cdr. Maxon's telephone number is 6110, and Mr. Hutchinson can be reached at the bank at 4270. DEDICATING THE AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL COMPLEX, distinguished guests turn over the first shovelful of earth (left to right): Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force; Einar Agustsson, Foreign Minister of Iceland; The Honorable James J. Blake, American Ambassador to Iceland; and Agnar Kofoed Hansen, Director, Civil Avia- tion, (photo by PH2 Rene1 Pearce)

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The White Falcon

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