The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 19.08.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 19.08.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White Fa/am Volume 33 Number 33 Keflavik, Iceland August 1977 Capt. Laurance assumes command NCS Tuesday Captain James D. Laurance will re- lieve Captain Ralph L. Spaulding as Commanding Officer, United States Naval Communication Station, Iceland in a change of command ceremony at the A. T. Mahan High School at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday. The Honorable James J. Blake, United States Ambassador to Iceland, will be guest of honor and Rear Admiral George B. Shick Jr., Commander Naval Telecom- munications Command, Washington, DC, will be the guest speaker. Commissioned Capt. Laurance graduated from John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD and was commissioned an ensign in the United States Naval Reserve after grad- uation from the Naval Officer Candidate School in 1956. He has since served in a wide variety of assignments, both at sea and ashore. Naval career After graduation from OCS, Capt. iLaurance was ordered to the Naval Com- Jmunications Facility, Yokosuka, Japan where he was assigned as a communica- tions watch officer. After a two-year tour, he reported to the Chief of Naval Operations Communications Cen- ter, Washington, DC. Augmenting to the Regular Navy in 1960, Capt. Laurance was assigned to the USS Chilton (APA-38) as communi- cations officer. Afterwards, he went to the USS Albany (CG-10) and then to the USS Canberra (CAG-2) for duty in the weapons depart- ment. In July 1964, he was assigned as communications plans office on the staff of Commander Western Sea Frontier, and was subsequently ordered to the staff of the Commander Naval Forces/Naval Advi- sory Group Vietnam. After serving as executive officer and then commanding officer of the USS Lindenwald (LSD-6) and executive offi- cer of the USS Rushmore (LSD-14), Capt. Laurance reported in 1969 to the Bureau of Naval Personnel. While at the bureau, he served in the plans and programs division and as the enlisted rating coordinator for communication/operation personnel in the Enlisted Personnel Control Division. In 1975, after two years as command- ing officer of the USS Hermitage (LSD-34), he reported to Commander, Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, as the assistant chief of staff for communications until July 1977. Capt. Laurance is his wife, the former accompanied by Lou Ann Bounds of Capt. James D. Laurance Baltimore, MD, and their two children. Travel important to tour The Spauldings feel that their stay in Iceland has been a rewarding and educational experience. They have been at Keflavik since January 1976, and have enjoyed many varied opportunities and activities available. The family found travel to various parts of Iceland to be an interesting challenge because they visited many areas in their four-wheel drive ve- hicle. Mrs. Spaulding participated in several wives organizations while the captain worked with the Kiwanis Club as service committee chairman, or tinkered with his Land Rover in his spare time. The Spauldings will depart Iceland Wednesday, flying to London where they will acquire a new camper, and then enjoy motoring through Europe enroute to Naples, Italy where Capt. Spaulding will assume responsibility as commanding officer of the U. S. Naval Communica- tions Area Master Station, Mediterran- ean. Their daughter, Kathryn, has already left for Munich, Germany, where she will attend the University of Maryland. 14 receives high Icelandic award DETACHMENT 14 Commander Lieutenant Colonel Covey Campbell received the Rey- kjavik Seaman's Day Committee's highest rescue award from committee chairman Petur Sigurdsson, a member of the Icelandic Parliament. The presentation, which took place Tuesday, was interrupted by an emergency scramble. Beginning Sept. 1 In a ceremony which ended with an emergency scramble, the members of De- tachment 14, 39th Aerospace Recovery and Rescue Wing, received a special award from the Reykjavik Seaman's Day Commit- tee Tuesday. During the presentation, members of the committee and detachment were called to aid an Icelandic seaman on a fishing vessel 400 miles south of the H-3 radar station. The seaman was suf- fering from an acute appendicitis at- tack. Preparations for the launching of aircraft were immediately taken, and a helicopter and Hercules tanker from Det. 14 were sent to the mid-ocean pickup point. The award, consisting of a trophy, certificate and commemorative medal, was presented in recognition of the long-term Search and Rescue (SAR) ser- vices which the detachment has contin- ually provided the country. The ceremony began at Det. 14 head- quarters with an address by Petur Sigurdsson, chairman of the Reykjavik Seaman's Day Committee and a member of Parliament. The five-man committee, which is responsible for recognizing outstanding accomplishments in fishing, seafaring and safety, granted the com- mittee's highest award to Det. 14 for "the squadron's unfailing dedication to the saving of human life within Iceland and around it rugged coast," according to Sigurdsson. The award, given only in case when people have clearly risked their own lives in an effort to save others, was last presented in the spring of 1976. In presenting the award, Sigurdsson said, "The unselfish action of the res- cue squadron helps to dispel misunder- standing and establish bonds of friend- ship between our countries." Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Covey Campbell, detachment commander, accepted the award "not only on behalf of the pilots and crews but also for the main- tenance men who keep them flying." As Colonel Campbell addressed the Icelandic delegates to thank them for the trophy, the call for assistance came. More than 90 per cent of the detach- ment's missions have been in support of national search and rescue operations. In addition to their regular duties, Det. 14 members have routinely provided flight demonstrations on Seaman's Day in Reykjavik, Keflavik and other coastal communities. States to dock pay checks Withholding of state income taxes from military pay of residents of Ken- tucky, Louisiana, Nebraska and Oklahoma is scheduled to begin Sept. 1. Kentucky, Louisiana and Nebraska a- greed to new standard agreements for withholding from the Treasury Department, while Oklahoma revised its state tax law that had previously exempted military pay from withholding. State income tax withholding from military pay started July 1 with 13 states for which withholding procedures vary. These states are; Alabama, Del- aware, *Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, **New Jer- sey, New Mexico, **New York, North Caro- lina, *Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Utah and Virginia. Service members should consult legal assistance officers for the details of state tax laws which would affect with- holding status. *In Idaho and Pennsylvania, military income of legal residents is taxable and will be withheld only while members are stationed in these states. **New Jersey and New York laws cur- rently provide that a member claiming legal residence in such state is pre- sumed to be a "resident" for income tax purposes unless he meets the following three conditions: (1) he does not main- tain a permanent place of abode in the state; (2) he does maintain a perman- ent place of abode outside the state; and (3) he spends not more than 30 days in the state during the tax year. The Department of Defense has been advised that six jurisdictions have in- dicated they will accept the new stand- ard agreement which provides for mili- tary withholding. Based on that assur- ance, the following states began with- holding since Aug. 1: Colorado, Dis- trict of Columbia, Indiana, Massachu- setts. Rhode Island and Wisconsin. The Maryland legislature has removed a state exemption of military pay from withholding, and the governor signed the revised law May 26. The proposed Treasury Department regu- lation provides that the effective date for replacement of existing other-than- standard agreements with the new stand- ard agreement is 120 days after the date of the final regulation. The following nine states have stand- ard agreements, but the applicable state tax laws specifically exempt military pay from withholding: Arkansas, Cali- fornia, Georgia, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio and West Virginia. Three states have standard agreements with the Treasury Department, but exempt military pay from income taxes: Illinois, Michigan and Vermont. The following three states which have other-than-standard agreements also have statutory provisions exempting military pay from taxation and/or withholding: Alaska, Arizona and Montana. The following 10 states do not have any tax agreement with the Treasury Department, so withholding is not an- ticipated: Connecticut, Florida, Nev- ada, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. New Keflavik CPO's named Eight first class petty officers have been selected for chief petty officer at Naval Station Keflavik. The new selectees who participated in the February examination are as follows: AC1 Kathleen Shanahan, AMH1 Roy E. Gustafson, BUI Kenneth Blouch, J01 Russell J. Murphy, MM1 John Klabechek, MSI William Carver, MSI Apolonio S. Luna and NCI Ronald Huther.

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The White Falcon

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