The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 21.10.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 21.10.1977, Blaðsíða 1
Yes, Virginia, it's true, you can get a Big Mac in Iceland. At least you can if you come to the PTO Carnival Oct. 29. According to Commander Harry Benter, NavFacKefs Commanding Officer, negotiations with McDonald's Corporation of America began in July to "bring on the burgers", and bring them on they they shall, as the NavFac booth is going to offer 2500 freshly cooked, stateside-style, "twoallbeefpattiespecialsaucelettu- cheesepicklesonionsoasesameseedbun" Big Macs. Additionally, the Ronald McDonald has been cordially invited to attend our carnival, and as of this writing, he is considering doing just that. Give yourself a break at the "NavFacKef McDonald's." John Meyer, the Carnival Operations Chairman, informed us that this year's carnival layout plan was developed in con- sideration of the fact that two meal periods would be covered in the carnival's noon to 9 p.m. operating hours. Accordingly, two large, roped-in picnic bench areas located close to several of the food booths will provide an oasis of clean, uncrowded, unjostled space where you can relax and enjoy the variety of food and drink which will be offered. But eating is far fiom the highlight of the day, reports Bill Harris, the Carnival Sales and Promotion Chairman. There will be all sorts of games-for-prizes. The Marine's giant tire swing is back, as is the NSGA Spook House. You'll be able to have your boss, spouse or whomever, locked up in the "Junior Jail", the Midnight Sundowners will perform several dance routines in addition to showing continuous Kiddie Cartoons; if your arm is strong and aim is good you'll be able to cool off an Air Force officer in the "Dunk the Brass" game. Just take a look at the mini-print of the Carnival layout in next week's White Falcon—then plan your day of fun with us. A postscript to all this fun from Al Jensen, the Carnival Construction Chairman, is that because the building of the booths this year will be done by booth sponsors, volunteer builders are a necessity. If you (parents, teachers, singles in the BEQ/BOQ's) can spare some, time to help hammer some booths together Thursday or Friday, an awful lot of people would be grateful. Let's help each other make this a Super Carnival. ________________________ Big Macs , to highlight Carnival Navy Radioman First Class Rafael I. Cuebas Six top NATO base members honored Air Force Airman Robert V. Martens Marine Private First Class Jacque A. Williams Air Force Staff Sergeant Charles R. Slusser Navy Dental KirDy D. Amonson Marine Corporal John D. Hetu Six men of the Iceland Defense Force were honored as Service Members of the Quarter in the IDF Headquarters building here last week. Presented awards at the 2 p.m. cere- mony Oct. 14 for their work from July to September were Navy Radioman First Class Rafael I. Cuebas and Dental Technician Klrby D. Amonson, Marine Corporal John D. Hetu and Private First Class Jacque A. Williams and Air Force Staff Sergeant Charles R. Slusser and Airman Robert V. Martens Jr. For the past six months, Petty Offi- cer of the Quarter RM1 Cuebas has been responsible for the maintenance and re- pair of U.S. government teletype equip- ment at 17 sites throughout Iceland, including the U.S. Embassy and Hofn. As the Communication Station teletype repair shop supervisor, the 30-year-old Navyman and his three-man crew have re- duced the shop's daily trouble calls from 20 to seven. When responding to a call, each man practices preventive maintenance and "now checks all equip- ment on the site to cut down on trouble," according to RM1 Cuebas. In addition to supervising and mon- itoring the routine office and mainten- ance work, RM1 Cuebas also teaches. After taking over the shop, the New York native realized the need for a training program. According to RM1 Cuebas, -.it is a "low level, more special- ized seven-week course" for on-the-job training of teletype repair. RM1 Cuebas' course has the same curriculum as the 12- week basic course in the states. In his OJT and "hands on" method of training, RM1 Cuebas plants trouble areas on various machines in the shop. He then monitors while personnel under- going OJT or refresher training in tele- type repair find and correct the trouble areas. For the 8-year veteran, his course and method of training is a more person- alized way of instructing. With one year left on a three-year tour, RM1 Cuebas hopes to instruct at the basic teletype repair school when he trans- fers. DN Amonson, general dentistry chair- side assistant at the Dental Clinic, is the Sailor of the Quarter. The versar tile Eagle Grove, Iowa, native has worked many different areas of dentis- try at the clinic. Besides serving as the sick-call and preventive dentistry technician, he also assists the prosthe- tic dental officer. The 19-year-old Navyman hopes to at- tend the Prosthetic "C" school next year. After slightly more than a year in the Navy, he has already begun to work for his goal—a Bachelor of Science Degree. He hopes to earn the degree by the time his enlistment is completed and then join the active reserves and enter den- tal school. DN Amonson feels that following a case through gives him pride and satis- faction in his work. Through the effects of watching a patient improve, he real*- izes that he helped the patient get bet- ter. In addition to studying areas relat- ing to his job, the dental technician also studies subjects he enjoys. He Is taking flight instructions to obtain a private pilot's license. Marine Noncommissioned officer of the Quarter Corporal John D. Hetu is a squad leader and corporal of the guard at the Marine Barracks. The El Paso, Texas, native takes his jobs seriously. In dealing with people, he realizes that tact is the utmost wea- pon he holds. "When one of my men get into trouble for some reason," he ex- plained, "it is my job to solve the pro- blem. Usually all I must do is talk with the people involved." With only two years of Marine service behind him, Cpl. Hetu finds his schedule here busy. Because of the varying hours, he is not able to take college course or do many of the things he would like— such as touring the area. His main hobby, collecting knives, has temporarily gone by the wayside. In holding the respon- sibility for his men during duty and off duty times, he devotes the majority of his time to their welfare. Private First Class Jacque A. Williams, Marine of the Quarter, has been with the Corps less than a year. A member of the barracks guard, the 21-year-old Lancaster, CA, native has spent much of his time helping others adjust to the Corps and duty in Iceland. Already holding a private pilot's license, the quiet Marine plans to gain instruction in instrument flying while here. A graphics technician in the AFI Com- troller graphic section, SSgt. Slusser, Air Force Noncommissioned Officer of the Quarter, spends his time here doing a variety of work. During his normal working hours, he prepares charts, graphs and posters. He also does artwork for projection slides and transparancies for all AFI units. Graphics and artwork take up only a part of the airman's time, 1However • Besides instructing an AFI Professional Military Education course to newly- assigned airman, he spends 10 hours each week teaching his trade to two high school students. The students, working under the Cooperative Work Experience program, spend two hours each after- noon in SSgt. Slusser's office. When the New Albany, New York, native entered the Air Force nine years ago, he spent nearly a year as a radio intercept analyst before deciding to use his artistic talent and cross-train to graph- ics technician. While in Iceland, he has discovered another interest and talent— he is an announcer for AFRTS during his off-duty time. He works at the station two nights a week and each Saturday. The 28-year-old airman, scheduled to be promoted in February, will be going to Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio, when he transfers in May. Airman Robert V. Martens Jr., Air Force Airman of the Quarter, is a member of the AFI Security Police Sec- tion. He plans to carry through with his military field and is majoring in police science in college. The West Palm Beach native feels that his best method of dealing with people and situations is to "be calm; don't blow things out of proportion." Rather than issuing a ticket or making an arrest, he generally gives verbal ad- vice and warnings to individuals he must deal with. "Most of the time, the person doesn't realize he is breaking the law," he explained. Spending most of his time on patrol or on guard in his vehicle, the 19-year- old airman is somewhat undecided about a military career. He feels it might be best to wait a few years before making a choice. Whether in the military or in the civilian world, however, he does know he wants to be policeman. "I've always wanted to be a 'cop'," he said, "and security police is as close as I could get with the service." Amn. Martens keeps up with his special interest in dealing with people even in his off duty time. He helps newly-arrived personnel adjust to the Security Police and to Iceland. He also enjoys touring the country and swimming and he has found people here "most friendly." A SPECIAL— Christmas card with a NATO Base/Iceland theme is available at the Hobby Shop Sales Store for only 15c Tne card was designed by Vi Eastman and has a "Merry Christmas and Happy New Year" message inside.

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The White Falcon

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