The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 13.01.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 13.01.1978, Blaðsíða 1
White&Fakon Volumo 34 Number 2 Koflavik, Iceland January 13, 1978 Special program at theater 3 p.m. today Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday Sunday * by TSgt Clarence E. Davis Martin Luther King Jr., the son of a minister, was born Jan. 15, 1929. He was a gentle boy who would rather turn his other cheek than strike back. He also was bright. He skipped three grades and was graduated from high school at the age of 15 and from Moorehouse College in Atlanta at 19. Deciding to follow in his father's footsteps, Dr. King earned his bachelor of divinity degree at Crozer Theologi- cal Seminary at Chester, PA, and, in 1955, he was awarded his doctor of philosophy degree at Boston University. Then he moved to Montgomery with his bride to assume his post as pas- tor. Shortly after his arrival, the bus dispute erupted and the civil rights movement claimed him. He had come to Montgomery, AL, to serve as pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. He wound up with a pastorate, encompassing all of black America. Mrs. Parks takes dispute's brunt If it had not been for Mrs. Rosa Parks, the world might never have heard of Martin Luther King Jr. It be- gan as a routinely simple incident for the southern town of Montgomery, but its impact was to be felt for years across the United States and, indeed, around the world. On Dec. 1, 1955, a black seamstress climbed aboard a municipal bus on her way home from a hard day's work in a Montgomery department store. She took her seat in the "colored" section, im- mediately behind a part of the bus usually reserved for whites. After the "white" section filled up, the bus driver ordered the black seam- stress, Mrs. Parks, to stand so that a white man could sit down. The seamstress angrily refused, and told the driver that, despite a state law, she would not surrender her seat. Because the amenities of Alabama did not provide for a black woman to sit while a white man stood, Mrs. Parks was arrested. The imprisonment of a respectable black woman for maintaining her. dignity and the widespread resentment about similarly accumulated frustrations Quality of Navy recruits questioned In its recruiting, the Navy strives to attract the most highly qualified people available. Advances in technol- ogy increase the demand for intelligent people who can be trained to operate and maintain the highly sophisticated ships and aircraft in the Navy's inven- tory. But are we getting that caliber of recruits? A recent study conducted by the'United States Office of Education revealed that 22 per cent of American adults cannot read well enough to handle all the demands of daily life. One estimate said that the overall reading level for US males stands at the ninth grade. As far as the Navy recruits go, a study of 32,000 recruits conducted at the Recruit Training Center in San Diego showed that 31 per cent of the recruits who graduated from high school read below the 10th grade level. Some of those read below the fourth grade level. The problem shows up when these re- cruits compete for advancement. The reading level of the material they are required to comprehend in order to be advanced does not match their abilities. Even the texts used by recruits in boot camp are often above the compre- hension levels. Those texts usually range from 10th to the 12th grade reading levels. Advancement manuals average out to a level of 12.6 years, and technical manuals range from the 12th grade level to the 14th. What is being done to improve the situation? For one thing, the Navy is attempting to reduce the reading grade level of its textbooks. This is not only expensive but also there is a lower limit to the degree of simpli- city to which extremely technical manu- als can be rewritten. Another remedy which the Navy is using is a remedial training program at recruit training centers. These programs are for those recruits who read below the sixth grade level. For those who read between the sixth and 10th grade levels, a program is being designed to upgrade both reading and job skill training. % i I I FOR THEIR ONE-YEAR per- fect attendance record at the NATO base Chapel Sunday School, Michael Weed and Judy Fowler re- ceived special awards Sunday during opening exercises at the Lower School. caused a 10-month boycott by 50,000 blacks, led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an obscure 26-year-old Baptist minister. Dr. King starts bus boycott Dr. King persuaded the black citizens of Montgomery to stay off the buses, in a historic boycott that caught the imagination of the world, and drew all eyes to the provincial Alabama city and its beleaguered blacks. White law enforcement officers, city officials and private citizens sought to intimidate, harass and divide the blacks, but to no avail. One ancient black lady summed up the general determination, as she trudged along on the road, saying, "My feets is tired, but soul's refreshed." Preaching a doctrine of nonviolent resistance, Dr. King told his followers: "...nonviolent resistance is not a method for cowards; it does resist...it does not seek to defeat or humiliate the opponent, but to win his friendship and understanding." The minister of love urged his followers to show love toward their enemies and to withstand their blows without striking back. He counseled them to go willingly to jail for refusing to accept the unjust laws, since unearned suffering was es- sentially redemptive and could bring about change. Kelly Ann May first baby in 1978 on base Making her debut as the first baby born in 1978 at the Naval Station Dis- pensary, Miss Kelly Ann May received her own special banner. Kelly took this honor Jan. 5 at 1:40 a.m., weighing 7 pounds and 10 ounces. Air Controller Second Class Jeffrey D. May and his wife, Kathy, are her parents. The Mays, originally from Mason City, IA, have lived at Keflavik since Novem- ber 1976. AC2 May has served in the Navy three and one half years and is presently attached to the Air Operations Depart- ment, Ground Control Approach Division. According to Walter Hocketstaller, clubs' management officer, the new parents will receive a complimentary meal at the Top of the Rock Club, in honor of the occasion. Blacks begin to change conditions All over the south, black Americans started to move toward changing their conditions. Dr. King made a call to many well- known black pastors; they met in At- lanta and formed the Southern Chris- tian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and elected King as their first president. As leader of SCLC, Dr. King led nonviolent protests all over the na- tion, disregarding his own safety. His own people criticized him. Black militants scornfully called him the "white man's best friend." But Dr. King never wavered from his basic belief that love was the black man's most powerful weapon. Dr. King's courage won the admiration of people all over the world. In 1964, it brought him the Nobel Prize for Peace. Characteristically, he donated the $54,000 prize money to the civil rights cause. Dr. King came to national attention when he and others climaxed their plans with the now great march on Washington, DC; 200,000 black and white Americans came to the nation's capital from all over the country to petition for free- dom. They gathered at the Lincoln Memorial Continued on page two (photo by PHC D. L. Brookins) FOR HER OUTSTANDING WORK at the Naval Station Dispensary, vicki L. Kerr re- ceived a Superior Professional Performance cash award of $150 last week. The award was presented by Captain Jack T. Weir, Commander Naval Forces Iceland/ Commanding Officer Naval Station Keflavik.

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