The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 27.01.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 27.01.1978, Blaðsíða 1
White' Falcon Volume 34 Number 4 Keflavik, Iceland January 27, 1978 Pay, benefits and retirement! Highlight report to Military Pay Commission SecNav and CNO speak out for sailors Secretary of the Navy W. Claytor Jr. and Chief of Naval Operations Admiral James L. Holloway III last week pre- sented their views and recommendations regarding military pay and benefits to the President's Commission of Military Compensation. Last week's hearing was the last of the eight public hearings to be con- ducted by the commission. The eoiimis- sion now will draft its proposals for » submission to the President March 15. Both SecNav and CNO stressed the unique character of military service as a prime factor in the consideration of possible changes to the present system of military compensation. Secretary Claytor emphasized that the government has a commitment to honor the agreements made with service members currently on active duty. Secretary Claytor stated that, "comparisons of military life with other sectors (such as the federal Civil Service, private corporations or state and local government) can be deceptive without a careful understand- ing of the unique environment and re- quirements that we impose on indivi- duals in the military. "Our personnel policies and com- pensation systems should continue to be designed to meet specific require- ments of the military and should not necessarily be directly comparable or competitive with those in other set- tings." Admiral Holloway said, "There are demands imposed upon our people in terms of work environment, living con- ditions , length of work week and existing or ever-present potential personal hazard which clearly preclude the drawing of comparisons between military and civilian career fields. "If the institutional characteristics which distinguish the military profes- sion from alternative occupational fields are eliminated, or if we attempt to precisely equate jobs or specialties in the military to those in the private sector, then we are effectively preor- daining the failure of the volunteer force concept." Need to carefully approach issue Secretary Claytor highlighted the need for a careful approach to the com- pensation issue. "In my view," he said, "changes in the system that we have today are much needed, but yet must be made with care and judgment; I am convinced that 'quick fix' solutions could be. inappropriate or potentially damaging. "Some potential compensation changes could have serious negative effects on the near-term morale and readiness of Mandatory Auto inspectionsstart Wednesday It's that time of year again, time for getting your car inspected. Whether you were in the states last year or in Iceland chances are that if you had a vehicle you had to get it inspected. If your vehicle tag starts with the letters "j" or »j0" vou can h»v« vour car inspected at the car wash located behind Public Works. This inspection is mandatory for all vehicles and each J or JO number will only have one day to be inspected. The schedule for inspections will be printed in the Plan of the Day and the White Falcon. The schedule in each edition of the White Falcon will list the J and JO numbers to be inspected during the following week. Inspections will be held between Feb. 1 and March 22, from 1:15 to 4:30. The following is a schedule for the first week of the inspection period. Wednesday, February 1 J-110 - JO-2026 Thursday, February 2 JO-2027 - JO-2953 Prayer Breakfast to be held at the Top of the Rock The annual observance of the National Prayer Breakfast will be held Thursday at 8 a.m. at the Top of the Rock Club. The scheduled guest speaker for the oc- casion will be David P.N. Christensen, the Deputy Chief of Mission at the Amer- ican Embassy at Reykjavik, Each year since 1953 a National Pray- er Breakfast in Washington, D.C. has been sponsored by prayer group members in the Senate and the House of Representatives and attended by officials in every branch of government, including usually the Pre- sident. By this example, government employees on all levels gather on this day to de- clare the importance of initial moral and spiritual values. Tickets for the National Prayer Breakfast are now on sale by key persons in each command and at the Chaplains' Office. Everyone is invited to attend. Girl Scouts to sell famous cookies on base February is Girl Scout Cookie Month. Your cookie stations will be located at the following areas: Navy Exchange and Commissary, beginning Feb. 7 from 3-5 p.m. and all day on Saturdays. The USO sales will begin also Feb. 7 from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and 3 to 9 p.m. Saturdays. Don't forget—the best opportunity to buy those fresh cookies is from the Girl Scout closest to you! I'm a Girl Scout Cookie... both the Navy and Marine Corps, despite the possibility of cost savings. "Compensation plan changes must be considered on an integrated basis; we must break the habit of making piece- meal adjustments in the compensation system one element at a time." Secretary Claytor suggested, "That the major challenge we face together in considering military compensation changes is how to balance two funda- mental considerations: Force effec- tiveness or manpower stability and cost efficiency—in a constructive fashion." 20-year retirement system Admiral Holloway discussed the ef- fect of the perceived "erosion of benefits" on Navy personnel, especial- ly with respect to possible changes to the 20-year retirement system. "As I know you have heard during your field visits," CNO said, "our people have seen what they consider to be a deliberate effort to erode the fringe benefit components of the compensation package in recent years. "They are watching the progress of this commission with keen interest and apparent apprehension as news reports appear indicating certain elements of the compensation system are being con- sidered for major overhaul. "I can assure you that, out exception, our people present retirement system changed. They are especia to the need to protect the tirement option as an equi of providing deferred comp the extraordinary demands our sailors and indirectly pendents by a career in th almost with- believe the should not be lly sensitive 20-year re- table means ensation for imposed on on their de- e Navy. Historical acceptance "American sailors historically have accepted the rigors of sea duty be- cause it was the way of life they an- ticipated when they chose a Navy career and because they knew there would be an option to transfer to the Fleet Reserve and embark upon a less turbulent life style after 20 years. More than any other single component, this one feature of the present re- tirement system has served to buoy up the sailor during repeated tours of sea duty throughout his career. "I am aware of the strong external pressures being brought to bear against the 20-year option for re- tirement at half pay and I therefore recognize the possibility that this option may be altered in the future from its present provisions." CNO said, "The Navy has accepted the desirability of certain modifications in the retirement system, but we are con- vinced that these must be evolutionary in nature and based upon clear recogni- tion of the unique part played by the 20-year retirement option in military manpower management. 20-year system vital to some members "I remain convinced that if the existing retirement system must be changed, it is essential that we retain the 20-year retirement option for those who are in our sea-intensive ratings and their counterparts in combat arms specialties in the other services. Therefore, service managers should be permitted to offer that option to members in sea-intensive and other arms specialties under certain circum- stances." With regard to people in the service today, the CNO said, "I must take a firm stand that no changes be made in the current 20-year retirement option for these members. I would include in such 'grandfathering protection' all enlisted personnel serving beyond Benefits Continued on Page 2 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER, Jon E. Gudmudsson, a world-famous Reykjavik pup- petmaker, applies a finishing touch to a puppet for A. T. Mahan fourth graders Monday afternoon. Puppet maker visits school Jon. E. Gudmudsson, a world famous Icelandic puppetmaker, is instructing at the A. T. Mahan Elementary School as a visiting cultural artist. The guest artist works as a painter and art teacher in Reykjavik and has made puppets for 30 years. Each Monday for five weeks he visits the elementary art classes, taught by Beth Cornell, to share puppetmaking with all classes. Each class level is busy designing faces and bodies for various styles. During this third week, the fourth grade students are using paper mache', sheepskin and fabric to design alli- gators, seals and birds. The bodies are made by the students or with the help of many parents. On Feb. 6, Jon will give a large puppet show with his favorite pup- pets. On the same day, many students from each class level will present their own show. Jon Gudmudsson has many famous puppets; some of which have appeared on television. He presents four major shows yearly in Iceland and around the world.

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