The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 03.02.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 03.02.1978, Blaðsíða 1
Events planned February is Black history month by TSgt Clarence E. Davis In February 1926, Dr. Carter G. Woodson, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History direc- tor, launched the celebration of Negro History Week. A short period, devoted to public exercises, this week empha- sized the salient facts of history in- fluenced by the Negroes—mainly facts brought to light by the association's research and publications during its first 11 years. This step was regarded as timely, and the enlightened public warmly re- sponded to the proclamation of this observance. The effort was widely sup- ported by schools, churches and clubs among Negroes and the movement gradually found support among institutions of other races in America and abroad. Today, the celebration enjoys a widespread participation. The observance comes each year about the second Sunday in February; the ob- jective being to select the week which will include both Feb. 12 and 1A. Negro History Week is meant to em- brace the birth dates of both. Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass—in the latter case, the date that Douglass calculated must have been his birth- day. Sometimes, the celebration can in- clude only one date. At such times, the selected date must include the Afro-American Frederick Douglass. In 1976, during the 50th Afro-Ameri- can history observance and the Bicen- tennial of the United States, the cele- bration of Afro-American history was extended for all of February, which has continued each year since 1976. The observance was so successful in increasing an awareness and apprecia- tion of Afro-Americans' contributions to the nation that the military has used this celebration as an important part of each year's calendar. Afro-American History Month also calls increased attention to ensuring equal opportunities for blacks in all facets of American life, as is guaran- teed them and all citizens by law. Thus, Afro-American History Month not only lauds the progress of the past but also aggressively addresses the challen- ges of the present. This is the 52nd annual observance of Black History Week/Month. The theme for 1978 is "Roots, Achievements and Projec- tions". The following events are sched- uled: Monday—film at USO at 7 p.m.; Thurs- day—Televisit on Afro-American history; Feb. 11—dramatic presentation and disco at the Top of the Rock Club at 7 p.m.; Feb. 12—film at Chapel at 7 p.m. and Feb. 13—soul food at the Enlisted Dining Facility at evening meal and film at USO at 7 p.m. Feb. 15—soul food dinner at USO at 7 p.m. and presentation at A. T. Mahan High School at 2 p.m. Feb. 16—soul food at the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron Dining Hall from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 18—Afro-American history library on display at USO from noon to 3 p.m. and soul disco and dance contest at USO at 7 p.m. Feb. 20—film at USO at 7 p.m. and Feb. 27—film at USO at 7 p.m. **Each week AFTV will have a to be announced showing on Afro-American his- tory. Frederick Douglass WhiteJSUFakan Volume 34 Number 5 Keflavik, Iceland February 3, 1978 Keflavik notes Hank Thorn pson Country star to perform T Snowstorms, harsh weather hamper mail delivery Country and Western star Hank Thompson, who can be seen weekly on Channel Four television in the "Kind- ly Keep It Country" show, is coming to the NATO base on March 8 and 9. Tickets for the Hank Thompson per- formances went on sale Wednesday at the Recreation Office, the Tour Of- fice, the Officers' Club and at the Top of the Rock. Performances were moved back one day from the date reported in the Jan. 21 edition of the White Falcon. Hank and his Brazos Valley Boys will perform twice at Andrews Theater Dental health program and once at the Officers' Club and at the Top of the Rock enlisted club. Tickets will be sold on a first- come, first-served basis, costing $6 each for adults and $3 each for children 12 and under for the shows at Andrews Theater. Performances at Andrews will be held at 6:30 p.m. on March 8 and 9. For the performance at the "0" Club and the Top of the Rock, tick- ets will cost $7.50 each. A western style dinner will be available at the "0" Club on a pay-as-you-go basis. Children's clinic starts tomorrow During February, the Dental De-. partment will sponsor a children's dental health program. This pro- gram will be available to all school age, authorized dependent children who have not seen a den- tist since Sept. 1, 1977. The program will consist of Sat- urday appointments for examinations, X-rays and stannous fluoride treat- ments. Further appointments will be made for those children who need extensive care. Parents should call 7425/or 4591 for information or to schedule these appointments. Club card policy explained All Naval Station K.etlavlk club pa- trons with a valid club card from theii respective club are authorized to play bingo at the Top of the Rock. Club card holders are authorized to sign in one guest or one married couple 'Love Is...' ior the purpose of playing bingo. Non- members of the Top of the Rock club and their guests must leave the club after bingo. Club cards are the only acceptable identification to enter the club. Valentine dinner at the Top of the Rock A Chapel Valentine dinner will be held Feb. 14 at the Top of the Rock ballroom. The evening will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will include a program on "Love Is___" A buffet dinner will follow. The meal will consist of roast beef, pork or turkey, fried chicken, fried shrimp, baked potato, vegetable, ah array of salads, rolls, tea or coffee and pastry. The Chapel will take this opportunity to bid hail to Chaplain Charles Duncan ~" and his wife, Charlotte, , and bless to Chaplain Stanley McCreary and his wife, Vicky. Tickets must be purchased by Thurs- day at the Chapel or from key personnel. Girl scout cookies on sale Sunday Girl Scout cookie time is scheduled ito begin Sunday at Keflavik. Base resi- dents may select their "favorites" from the the closest Girl Scout. A large variety of fresh, crisp cookies are just waiting for you at the Commissary Store, Navy Exchange and USO. Snow storms and harsh winter weather, hitting the United States, are the pri- mary causes of the small amounts of mail now being received by the NATO base Post Office. A two-week backlog exists because of the.stateside weather. This condition is expected to last at least another two weeks. First class and airmail (priority mail) is flown daily to Keflavik from the Fleet Post Office New York via Loftleidir under a mail cor -act be- tween the United States Po Office and Loftleidir. Bulk mail—parcels, space available mail, parcel airlift, magazines and newspapers—are carried by Loftleidir on a space available bssis. Most of the bulk mail which comes to Keflavik is flown up on Military Airlift Com- mand flights from McGuire AFB, NJ. The base Post Office normally re- ceives priority mail each day unless the Loftleidir flight has been delayed For first termers by weather or mechanical difficulties. Mail is diverted to military fliehts only when Loftleidir has not made the New York flight in 48 or more hours. All outgoing mail is flown by Loft- leidir. Priority mail goes to the FPO, which is located at John F. Kennedy International Airport. Bulk mail goes from JFK to the New York Foreign and Bulk Mail Center in New Jersey. When no mail arrives with the Loft- leidir flight, Post Office personnel call New York to find out why. The usual reason for mail delay is a mis- connection, such as the FPO mail truck being late in delivering mail to Loftleidir. Another consideration is the transit time in the United States to FPO New York. Again, the weather af- fects the movement of the mail. The timeliness of mail delivery should become more reliable once the weather in the states improves. Tours in Iceland may be extended The Chief of Naval Personnel has instituted a new policy that may affect the tour length of first termers stationed in Iceland. According to the Naval Station Person- nel Office first termers who have less than one year remaining in their enlist- ment at the time they would normally transfer will be automatically extended in Iceland until the end of their enlist- ment. The news;release from CNO was as follows: / To improve personnel stability, the Chief of Naval Personnel has established a policy that first term enlisted person- nel with less than one vear obligated service will not be rotated from shore duty in CONUS to sea duty. Additionally, first term enlisted personnel serving overseas shore duty tours with less than one year remaining will be extended until their expiration of active obligated service (EAOS) unless pre- cluded by DoD directives. Also, to ensure a similar opportunity for all to serve at sea, and whenever practical, those few first term personnel who must be initially assigned to duty ashore can expect to serve at least one sea tour auring the latter part of their first enlistment. To accomplish this, their initial shore tour will be adjusted to two years. Auto inspection requirements set Annual "JO" auto inspections began Wednesday for "J" and "JO" motor vehicles. If your vehicle tag starts with the letters "JO" or"j" you can have your car inspected at the car wash located behind Public Works. This is mandatory for all vehicles with "J" or "JO" numbers. There are re- quirements that must be made before you bring your car for inspection. 1. Vehicle must be ready for in- spection. 2. Have a valid headlight inspect- ion . | 3. Have vehicle registration (Ice- landic and Militai«y'> and Insur- ance papers . 4. Report for vehicle inspection in accordance with the below list- ed inspection dates: Continued on page 3

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