The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 28.04.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 28.04.1978, Blaðsíða 1
Money shortage affects Navy transfers Based on a permanent change of sta- tion (PCS) funds shortage for fiscal year 1978 fourth quarter, the Chief of Naval Operations has initiated a short- term policy, regulating PCS orders which affect all officers and enlisted person- nel with July, August or September 1978 projected rotation dates. Personnel who received orders dated before April 8 are not affected. Officers will continue to receive PCS orders, according to the following: No cost reassignments, accessions and sep- arations, reassignment after completing maximum overseas tours, hospitaliza- tions, assignment as commanding or exe- cutive officer, duty under instruction (DUINS) through August, new construc- tions/decommissionings and assignments to/from sea duty as funding permits. PCS orders for all other officers will be delayed until October 1978 if additional funds are not allocated. The following PCS orders will con- tinue to be assigned to enlisted per- sonnel: Accession orders to and from training assignments, including school graduates and drops, separation orders (fleet initiated), assignments to new constructions, from decommissioning or inactivating units, immediate availa- bilities—from or to hospitals and rehabilitation centers and reenlist- ment incentives. OTHER ENLISTED PCS ORDERS Additionally, enlisted personnel will continue to receive PCS orders for: Assignment after completing a five-year maximum sea tour; assign- ment after serving a tour in a depen- dent-restricted area and members as- signed to Type 2 ships/units who are operating in an overseas area for a proposed period of one year, assign- ment to, but not from, recruiting, Armed Forces Entrance and Examining Station, instructor and recruit company commander billets and no-cost assignments. If additional PCS funds are not made available, orders for all other enlisted personnel will be delayed until October 1978. NAVY REQUESTS MORE FUNDS The Navy has requested additional funds to alleviate the shortage. Con- gress must approve these; however, a decision on this matter is not antici- pated before mid-July. These actions will cause unavoidable gapping of some officer and enlisted billets. Exceptions to this policy will be granted on a case-by-case basis, depending on the urgency of the requirement and the availability of funds. Personnel affected by these cost-avoidance actions will be personal- ly notified. Every effort will be made to minimize inconvenience and hardships to personnel within the framework of available PCS funds. According to Commander Paul J. Thorpe, Iceland Defense Force assistant chief of staff, J-l Administration/Per- sonnel Division, mistakes will probably be made in a few cases such as cancel- lation of orders issued before April 8 or personnel being extended when they should receive orders. KEFLAVIK OUTLOOK "I recommend that in the event a mistake is made, the person involved shoul request his/her command look into the matter to get it straightened out," Cdr. Thorpe stated. "I think there is a good chance we'll get more funds for PCS moves in July." Air Forces Iceland Comptroller Cap- tain Harry R. Masters said that there were no problems expected with Air Force PCS funding. At the present time, Marine Barracks Keflavik personnel officials anticipate no problems with their PCS funds. WhiteJ^Faleoik Volume 34, Number 17 Keflavik, Iceland April 28, 1978 APPOINTED in early March, the Employee Advisory and Communications Committee chairman Halldor Magnusson is congratulated by Captain Jack T. Weir, Commander Naval Forces Iceland/Commanding Officer Naval Sta- tion Keflavik. Commander Walter J. Landen and Captain M. C. Clegg, who helped lay the groundwork for the group, share in the ceremony, (photo by PH3 Tom Wall) NEW RECREATION DEPARTMENT officer Lieutenant Commander Stanley L. Primmer was presented the Navy Commendation medal last week. The medal is based on his outstanding service as assistant operations officer for Commander Patrol Wings U. S. Atlantic from August 1975 through March 1978. As staff facility mana- ger, his responsibilities included three naval air stations. Navy's top enlisted member to visit NavSta Keflavik The master chief petty officer of the Navy is slated to visit the Keflavik NATO base early next week. Master Chief Operations Specialist Robert J. Walker will visit the base as part of a four-base, nine-day trip. He is expected to arrive early Tuesday evening and will leave late Thursday morning. During his stay, the 49-year-old master chief will attend a luncheon with E-6 through E-9 personnel at the Top of the Rock Club from noon until 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Additionally, he will hold a session with all hands at the Andrews Theater from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. that same afternoon. Other events planned for the master chief are a visit with Patrol Squadron Fifty-Six and base officials, a base briefing and tour and a visit to Rey- kjavik. A New York native, Master Chief Walker has been master chief of the Navy since September 1975. Nearly 17 years of his career have been in ship- board duty and eight years have been spent in instructing and training duties. Before taking over his present as- signment, Master Chief Walker was master chief petty officer (force master chief) of Naval Air Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet. Among his nine awards, Master Chief Walker holds the Navy Achievement and Commendation medals, both of which cited his superior leadership abili- ties. Other bases the 30-year Navy veteran will visit during this trip include Naval Air Station Brunswick, ME; Naval Station Bermuda; and Naval Facility Lajes. Law Day May 1; A memorial for justice By Cdr. Walter f. Landen * While May Day is a national day of celebration in many countries, includ- ing Iceland, it is also a special day in the United States. By joint reso- lution of Congress and presidential proclamation May 1 has been set aside as Law Day. This annual nationwide event is not a day set aside for lawyers, but a day for every citizen to think about the role law plays in our society. Law is that intangible force that makes free- dom possible, the search for equal justice achieveable, and which enables a highly industralized complex society to function with a maximum of order and a minimum of injustice and infringe- ment upon basic human rights. It is a time for all citizens to reflect upon the rights they hold under the United States Constitution: Free speech, free press, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion, freedom from unreasonable search and seizure and the right to legal counsel. Law Day serves as a reminder that law should not be taken for granted, but must be nurtured and sustained by all citizens every day of the year, for a government without law is limit- ed to administration of services. Whether or not we agree that the American system is the best, it does rank as a daring effort for the work- ing out of solutions, in a peaceful and orderly manner, to the many and varied problems generated by a com- plex industrialized society. The alternative is a government which recognizes few if any individual rights. Law Day is also a day when citizens are asked to consider their individual duties and responsibilities such as (1) to be informed on issues of govern- ment and community affairs; (2) to support and encourage efforts to up- date and modernize our courts; (3) to vote in elections; (4) to obey, re- spect and uphold the law; (5) to sup- port those institutions and persons charged with law enforcement; (6) to respect the rights of others; (7) to practice and teach the principles of good citizenship in their home; and (8) to serve on juries and as a court witness if called. As the Founding Fathers wrote it, the Declaration of Independence was a catalogue of numerous injustices perpetrated by the British Crown upon the colonies. The Declaration led, after five years of war, to the crea- tion of the Constitution. The Con- stitution launched the United States on a search for justice that has been pursued to this day. Each of us on this Law Day, should rededicate oneself to the ideals of equality and justice under law with each other and to encouraging and fostering that respect for law that is so vital to our democratic way of life.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.