The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 19.05.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 19.05.1978, Blaðsíða 1
ICELANDIC POLICEMAN Sigurdur Joakimsson and BM2 Dennis Mauzy, secur- ity safety patrol supervisor, test a newly-acquired radar gun. The device, to be used on the Agreed Area starting Wednesday, will enable Icelandic and base authorities to monitor vehicle speeds here, (photo by PHAN Kirk Fasking) To improve traffic safety, a joint U. S./Icelandic patrol will begin op- erating a newly-acquired radar gun on the Agreed Area on Wednesday, May 24. The traffic patrol, consisting of one Naval Station Security member and one Icelandic policeman, will use the radar gun at random times and places to control vehicle speeds on the Agreed Area. Patrol cars, equipped with red lights, will be furnished by NAVSTA Security and the Icelandic Police, and will be used on an alternating basis. Violators of speed limits will be shown the radar-clocked speed on the radar gun prior to receiving a traf- fic citation, which will be written in kilometers-per-hour (KPH). Personnel receiving a speeding citation will have their cases tried by the Icelandic Court, which is loca- ted at the Njardvik gate. Speed radar to control drivers on base Whitel^JFaJkon Volume 34, Number 20 Keflavik, Iceland May 19, 1978 £(,£ Afi F r% II r\ f\ i President Carter honors past *-s I& rmed Forces Day May 20 . . yn i ' i and present service members ( The observance of Armed Forces day, May 20, is a well-earned tribute to US Servicemembers and a reminder that mili- tary readiness is essential to ensuring peace and security for our Nation. Almost two centuries ago, President George Washington said, "There is a rank due to the United States among nations which will be withheld, if not absolute- ly lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; If we desire to secure peace, it must be known that we are at all times ready for war." This is as true today as it was at the end of the 18th century. Thus, as we read and hear the debated pros and cons of military power and defense spend- ing, we might keep in mind that such questions have been raised before. Throughout the history of the US, it has been the tendency to prepare for war when it was forced upon us, and to dis- mantle our military forces when fight- ing was over. This "national philosophy" goes back to post-Revolutionary War days. Those early US citizens, leary of military might, thought that a large standing army should not be maintained in times of peace. And our ocean borders were considered natural protection. But such is no longer the case. Mod- ern technology now enables a potential enemy to hurl missiles over or from un- der the oceans onto our cities in a matter of minutes. This coupled with today's close East-West balance of pow- er, makes it imperative that the US be prepared for any eventuality. Such thinking is not new. Thomas Jefferson declared, "Eternal vigilance is the price of Liberty." And his fel- low Virginian, Patrick Henry, dramatic- ally pointed out, "The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, and the brave." Many years later, John F. Kennedy said, "This Nation can afford to be strong, it cannot afford to be weak. We shall do what is needed to make and keep us strong." Today, President Jimmy Carter echoes this theme that has been sounded by Amer- ican i statesmen throughout our history. He's stated, "While I am President, our military strength and our capability to defend freedom will be second to none in all the world." The history of the world has shown that nations secure peace only through being prepared for war. President Dwight D. Eisenhower perhaps expressed it best: "We seek peace, knowing-as all ages of man have known-that peace is the climate of freedom. And now, as in no other age, we seek it because we have been warned by the power of modern weap- ons that peace may be the only climate possible for human life itself." Base cleanup successful 250 tons of trash collected • Excellent results follow the basewide cleanup that collected a total of 250 tons of trash last week. The base split up into sections, and each department and tenant command was given one of these sections to clean up. All day long more than 50 dump trucks and more than 200 pickup trucks trans- ported loads of trash to the dump for disposal. Large amounts of metal and other trash were removed from every area of the base, around the airfield, Fuel Farm vicinity, main base area and housing area. Each department and command trans- ported all the trash which could be handled to the dump with respective ve- hicles. Heavier material such as metal, or large amounts of wood, was picked up by the Public Works Depart- ment heavy equipment section. Within the next month, the ",''?0 base expects to have a metal bailer, and will receive an incinerator in 18 months which will make the trash dis- posal problem at the Naval Station a thing of the past. The Naval Station gives a "well done" to everyone who participated in the base cleanup. Channel five is coming soon BEFORE THE BASEWIDE CLEANUP, the Naval Sta- tion Dump was just that. AFTER CANVASSING THE EN- TIRE BASE, the dump is now certainly cleaner, more convenient to use and overall better for all patrons as is the NATO base as a whole.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.