The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 02.06.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 02.06.1978, Blaðsíða 1
Memorial Day C-117 dedication To remember Navy and Marine Corps personnel who have served in Iceland, a permanent display of C-117 aircraft No. 17191 was dedicated Memorial Day. Captain Jack T. Weir, Naval Station Keflavik commanding officer, delivered the keynote address and Chaplain (Lieu- tenant Commander) Richard M. Mattie gave the invocation. Sveinn Eiriksson, Naval Station Fire Department chief, read the Icelandic translation of the display plaque. Key technical personnel, whose work restore and mount the aircraft made Ehe display a reality, also attended the dedication. The original Dakota type aircraft was gradually replaced by the C-117 version in 1972, with one of the C-117s arriving just in time to par- ticipate in the Iceland Defense Force support of relief efforts during the volcanic eruption in the Westman Islands in 1973. The C-117 is a rebuilt, enlarged version of the Douglas DC-3 airliner which was used during World War II and after the Defense Force was es- tablished in 1951. Aircraft No. 17191 was the last of a long line of Douglas twin engine transports to serve with United States forces in Iceland. A decision to stop maintaining the C-117 was made by U.S. military in 1977. April 29, 1977, No. 17191 made its last official flight, car- rying personnel and equipment to the radar station at Stokksnes, just as it had done since Its ar- rival . This service to the Stokksnes radar station is now continued by contract with Flugfelag because the Navy has no aircraft in its inven- tory which could successfully re- place the C-117 in size, perform- ance and economy. White iFahm Volume 34, Number 22 Keflavik, Iceland June 2, 1978 New MCPOC has arrived The new Naval Station Keflavik Com- mand Master Chief PNCM(SS) Frederic B. Marshe has arrived and is ready to as- sume his new job with energy and op- timism. PNCM(SS) Marshe is relieving AFCM D. G. Bennardo Monday, after MCPO Bennardo acquaints PNCM Marshe with his new duties and assignments. Master Chief Bennardo has served as Command Master Chief since July 1975, and is being transferred to the Navy Manpower Management Analysis Center, Norfolk, VA Wednesday. After serving in the Navy since 1952, PNCM Marshe retired from the Navy in 1971 and decided to return to his Navy career in 1976. He then served on the USS Henry L. Stimson (SSBN-655) before reporting to Kefla- vik. When asked what his first reactions and feelings were when first hearing of his new duty assignment, PNCM Marshe replied, "At first, I was a little hesistant in my enthusiasm for being stationed at Keflavik, Iceland, mainly because of the many (different) statements I have heard about this station." "After what I have seen in the couple weeks I've been here, the stories I've heard are not true. I am now aware and impressed with the many activities and programs offered to personnel on base. There are tours available; lodges to go to so you can get out and have a good time off base." "This is also the first time I have been stationed overseas, and it's a good change of pace. The Environmental and Morale Leave flights are the best opportunity to "ee Europe...." AF dinner set General James E, Hill, Commander in Chief of North American Air Defense Com- mand/Aerospace Defense Command, will be arriving at Keflavik Thursday. The general will be the guest speaker at the Air Forces Spring Dining Out at the Officers' Club that evening. Black mess dress, enlisted formal dress or other formal attire is required for the occasion. Cordon Bleu or filet mignon will be the bill of fare. If you need additional information, contact Chief Master Sergeant Leckie at 4187. "I'm also impressed with how clean and beautiful the towns, landscape and air is here. I flew over the area in a C-118, and the tour was interesting with the view of such a rugged and unusual landscape." Being the active type, PNCM Marshe enjoys bowling. When his golf clubs ar- rive, he will be eager to try the chal- lenge of Icelandic golf. The master chief's wife, Bonnie, and two boys, David 13 and Mark 10, are all residing at their new base quarters. When queried about a C M/C does to help his command, PNCM Marshe answered, "The C M/C represents all the enlisted personnel in his command to the cap- tain. In other words, he's a direct liaison between the enlisted members and the commanding officer." "You try to get the feeling of the people on base, their likes and dis- likes, what they need and what may be a good idea to bring to the captain. Also, I can help the captain by in- forming him how the enlisted personnel feel on certain issues and improve/es- tablish better communications in the chain of command. "I try to know the attitudes and feelings of the people by being a member of committees, getting in- volved with activities and talking to people at community places. The swinging doors on the C M/C office represent the open mindedness and open-door policy the C M/C uses in carrying out his duties." PNCM(SS) Frederic B. Marshe pauses to reflect on being the new master chief petty officer of the command. (Falcon staff photo) Radio marathon raises $ for Navy Relief The "Mad Man of the Air Waves," Sea- man Sam Spear, sat positioned in the studio anxious to begin the American Forces Radio Service marathon to help aid the Navy Relief Society. The date was May 29 (Memorial Day); the time was 6 a.m. The first song to begin the radio marathon was the "Marine Hymn." The Marines pledged $100 to hear the hymn played every hour on the hour, up to 65 hours. If disc jockey Sam Spear would surpass 65 hours, the Marines agreed to pay one dollar an hour to hear the hymn until the marathon ended. The radio marathon is going excep- tionally well. There is a great deal of enthusiasm involved and many lis- teners have responded actively to the Navy Relief Society through AFRS. At 10 a.m. Wednesday, the total amount contributed was $2,500. Seaman Spear has done a tremendous job of supporting the Navy Relief Society. He voluntarily accepted the role as the Navy Relief Society disc jockey, and has maintained a profes- sional, likeable disposition for more than 60 hours. Sam Spear's enthusiasm and outgoing personality has had a definite influence on listener interest. Let's all contribute to the Navy Re- lief Society by pledging to the AFRS radio marathon and accomplish a goal not only for Sam Spear but also for each other. Remember, the Navy Relief Society's purpose is to help sea ser- vice personnel. SAM SPEAR, AFRS Navy Relief Society marathoner, cues up for some more "platter chatter." (Falcon staff photo)

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The White Falcon

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