The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 21.07.1978, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 21.07.1978, Blaðsíða 2
Page 2 White Falcon July 21, 1978 Navy Exchange news by Marlyn Wiltso The Driftwood hours of operation will be Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Temporary revision is due to relocation of the Navy Exchange facili- ties! The Driftwood Sandwich bar has moved to the Viking Cafeteria. Stop by the Sandwich Bar and top off your sand- wich with a milk shake. NEX EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH Helga Johnnsdottir, NEX visual mer- chandiser, was selected as the June "Employee of the Month." Helga has worked for the exchange since 1956 and has proved to be a valuable asset during the recent grand opening. Helga's artis- tic talents are exhibited by displays throughout the retail facilities. NEX BARGAINS Just about every authorized Navy Ex- change customer knows about the overall savings on NEX merchandise. For example, sales events as well as the Bonus Buy and X-tra Value offerings allow you to compound the true value of your NEX pri- vilege. Every one of these programs either exceeds the survey average or of- fers an above average value for the a- mount spent. Bonus Buys are exactly what the term implies. These products that have been obtained through special price negotia- tions between NEX buyers and the respec- tive suppliers. Bonus Buys usually are one-time shipments, although there have been instances of repeat offerings. X-tra Values pertain mostly to the clothing category, and the program is of a continuing character. That is, an at- tempt is made to feature this merchandise throughout the year so that customers Military news Women aboard ships approved: Senate also reconstructs sea pay Permanent assignment of women aboard ships and restructure of sea pay were included in the $36.1 billion authori- zation bill passed by the Senate last week. The House earlier had passed a $38 billion version of the same bill which covers purchase and development of wea- pons systems for the next fiscal year. Both versions authorize construction of a fifth nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. A House-Senate conference is attempt- ing to iron out differences between two bills. Both House and Senate voted to include the assignment of women to ships in their authorizations. The bill that evolves after the House- Senate conference will be voted on by both chambers of Congress and then sub- mitted to the president for signature. The $36.1 billion the Senate approved is $600 million more than the president's request which did not include funds for either a nuclear or conventional air- craft carrier. The Senate passed an amendment to the authorization bill which would halt con- struction of further nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in the future. The amendment urged building "more surviva- ble, more numerous and less costly" wea- pons. The Senate rejected another amendment which would have cancelled almost a bil- lion dollars earmarked for purchase of the new F-18 aircraft. The appropriations bill, another part of the defense budget, is in the House committee now and will set aside money for projects approved in the authoriza- tion bill. It is scheduled to come up before the House and Senate before the next of the month. Construction of the fifth nuclear- powered aircraft carrier and other pro- jects included in the authorization bill are not guaranteed until the appropria- tions bill is passed by Congress and signed by the president. Petty Officers: A few warned to shape up or ship out While the majority of the Navy's ap- proximately 144,000 first and second class petty officers have performed "sup- erbly," according the the Bureau of Naval Personnel, 1,976 have been cited for failing to meet standards and will re- ceive warnings, referrals or discharges. The actions result from recommenda- tions made by the third annual E-5/6 pet- ty officer quality control review board. Letters of substandard service will be sent to 1,596 of the control program, the alcohol review board or the equal oppor- tunity division. Some were reduced in rate, administratively discharged or in- vited to the fleet reserve. 4,000 AF officers can attend it The fiscal year 1979 Air Force In- stitute of Technology selection board will consider approximately 4,000 offi- cer candidates when it convenes Sept. 5 at the Air Force Manpower and Personnel Center. Personnel officials say that quotas have been tentatively set at 503 for master's degree and 37 for doctoral de- gree programs, while 125 are expected for education with industry. To be considered, officers should apply before Aug. 1. Individuals concerned will be notified via their commanding officers. Sul- standard performers will require the Bureau of Naval Personnel's approval to reenlist or extend. The petty officer quality control re- view board was established to maintain the high quality of Navy petty officers and to "weed out" poor performers. More than 85 per cent of the active duty non-prior service recruits were high school graduates including 5.7 per cent with high school-equivalent certifi- cates. More than 84 per cent are eligi- ble to attend "A" school. To date in fiscal year 1978, 83 per cent of all active duty non-prior service enlistees are high school graduates in- cluding seven per cent with equivalent certificates, more than 87 per cent are eligible to attend "A" school. Colonel promotion board set The calendar year 1978 central tempo- rary colonel promotion board will meet at the Air Force Manpower and Personnel Cen- ter Nov. 27, 1978. Date of rank (DOR) of Dec. 31,1974, and earlier has been for primary-zone eligibles. Secondary-zone DOR eligibility is Jan.l, 1975-0ct. 31, 1976. will have a choice between national brand items and the lesser known brands repre- sented as X-tra Values. Even though the labels may not be household words, the program offers quality, no-nonsense goods at considerable savings. The Keflavik Navy Exchange is hard to beat when it comes to obtaining value on a regular basis. The wise shopper who makes it a point to capitalize on fre- quent sales as well as money-saving programs will probably discover that NEX is second to none. Observe the posters. Read NEX flyers. Be on the lookout for shelf markers that identify special offerings. You may suddenly find that your money goes fur- ther at the Navy Exchange. SERVICE STATION SUNDAY HOURS The NEX Service Station will be open Sundays from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. for gasoline sales only. Extended hours will continue throughout the summer for your touring convenience. NAVY EXCHANGE SERVICES TO MOVE Personalized Services will soon re- locate in Bldg. 869-B adjacent to the Retail Store in approximately two weeks. Toyland/Sporting Goods will move to the second floor in Bldg. 869-B soon. The Driftwood Cafeteria will be relocated to Bldg. 869-B in approximately three weeks, completing the consolidation and will open as the "Geyser Cafeteria". During August, the Mini-Mart and Bev- erage Store will be relocated to the Viking Building. Tours and travel by Madeleine Grimsley On the bus tour July 29, the route goes to Hvalfjordur (Whale Bay); and if any whales are in, the bus will stop. ,From there, the trip follows the road to Borgarfjordur district, one of the most prosperous farming areas in Iceland to view Borgarfjordur valleys and visit the educational center in Reykjolt. The tour continues over the low hills to the great glacial river Hvita (White River) and follows it upriver to the woodlands and Husafell camping ground. Along the way, subterranean streams cascade into the glacial river. Contin- uing on to the Kaldidalur (Cold Valley) road among the glaciers 0k, Eiriksjokull and Langjokull, the tour enters the Thingvellir plain from the north and re- turns through Reykjavik. Depending on the weather, this tour may be reversed, beginning at Thingvellir. Once again it's time for "Light Nights". For the ninth consecutive sea- son, the summer theater is presenting this traditional form of Icelandic enter- tainment, performed in English. Unique to Europe, the cast performs in a fire- side evening of songs and stories and poetry which gives the audience an in- sight into the history of Iceland. The summer theater was founded in 1965 by Kristin Magnus and her husband, Halldor Snorrason, who realized that there was little to offer the visitor about Iceland's cultural history. Beginning with the Viking Age, this traditional entertainment originated on long winter nights on the lonely farms in Iceland. The household head would gather the family beside the hearth and read to them or perhaps sing the folk songs which told the history of their ancestry. Performances of "Light Nights" will be presented every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights with cur- tain time at 9 p.m. at the Hotel Loftlei- dir Theater. Reservations are not re' quired. Tickets may be purchased at the Tour Office in Bldg. 771. The Tour Office has moved to a new location in the Viking Bldg. After you enter the front door, take a right, then a left to the last office on the right side of the hall next to the Bowling Alley. Reservists: NR NS Kef 1066 Ends Annual Cruise "Sure would like to have them longer,' a Naval Station supervisor said of a group of Naval Air Reservists who aug- mented his staff during their two weeks' "acdutra" (active duty training), which concluded today. "We're going to miss them," he added. This appears to have been a common reaction in the 11 sections where the 59 officers and enlisteds of Naval Re- serve Naval Station (NR NS) Keflavik 1066 from Washington, DC spent their time during the annual required train- ing. Almost all the reservists had a similarly positive reaction to this first opportunity any of them have had to train in work areas they would be assigned during mobilization. "Facilitating integration of our reserve personnel with station hands here should mobilization become a reality is the primary purpose of having the unit do its two-week 'cruise' here in Iceland," said Cap- tain Harry Boggs, skipper of NR NS Keflavik 1066. HMC Horace Bruce of Herndon, VA, a long-time member of the Naval Air Reserve Unit (which is based at Andrews AFB, MD outside Washington), observed, "We've never been welcomed at any unit as we have here at the Station Hospital." He was one of six reservists assigned there. Similar remarks were made by other members of NR NS Kef 1066, whose two weeks in Iceland were made more memorable with two bus tours— one to Reykjavik, the other to scenic spots such as the Gullfoss Waterfalls and the Geysir—arranged through the station's Human Relations Office. RESERVIST NURSE Ltjg Sarah Whelan takes call at OPD desk at Station Hospital. The White Falcon Commanding Officer Capt. Jack T. Weir Public Affairs Officer J02 Jerry L. Foster Editorial Staff J02 Ray D. Oosterman JOSA Paula Ritrovato AA Karen Mayo The White Falcon is published each Friday in accordance with SECNAVlNST. 5720.44 for distribution to U. S. military personnel, Naval. Station Keflavik, Iceland, and their depen- dents, and to military and civilian employees of the Iceland Defense Force and their families. It is printed in the Naval Station Print Shop from appropriated funds in ac- cordance with NAVEXOS P-35. The opinions and statements made herein are not to be construed as official views of the Department of Defense or the U. S. Government. News items, questions, sugges- tions and comments may be submitted by calling the Naval Station Public Affairs Office at 4612 or by vis- iting the Naval Station Public Af- fairs Office in Bldg. T-44.

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