The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 04.03.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 04.03.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Our 'mibsidn' Jfs TD PRDDUCE Service news alccn j/Jhd we intend ^ull coverage j?n each issue Volume XI, Number 9 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, March 4, 1961 Sgt. Bizet, foreman of the News Room here at KA comes up with this one. Bizet recom- mends that each person assign- ed, when leaving, take a small rock along with him. Then when he gets to McGuire, place it at some designated spot. This mound of rocks would stand as a memorial to those who have served in Iceland. A second SAC unit, the 305th Bomb Wing at Bunker Hill AFB, Ind., is converting from slower B-47 bombers to the supersonic B-58 Hustlers. The 305th will receive its first B-58 in May and will be fully equipped with its 40 plane com- plement by May 1962. Twenty KC-135 refueling tank- er planes already are in place at Bunker Hill. The 43d Bomb Wing at Cars- well AFB, Tex., was the first to receive the Hustler. # * * The officers and men of the attack transport Paul Eevere, along with the ship's embarked Marines of Bit. 1-9, have set a new Navy record for blood contributions by donating 261 pints of blood to the Manila blood bank. The response to the call was so great that some 100 volunteers had to be turn- ed down when bottles ran short. * * * A 30x65 feet glass-walled room at Vandenberg AFB, Calif, houses equipment similar to that in an actual blockhouse on a missile site. It provides crew trainees with ways to practice checkout, readiness monitoring, and count- down procedures. Using the simulator, the mis- sileman learns proper procedures before being assigned to training with an ATLAS E operational crew. * * * Amid the tumult of missiles and supersonic aircraft, the Navy is pausing to look back some 200 years to the days of early, lighter-than-air flight and the original hot-air balloon. Navy researchers are studying the balloon for possible applica- tion in military construction, transport and supply opera- tions. * * * For those of you who might be interested, there is only one Friday 13th, during the rest of 1961. It will occur in Oct- ober. And if you haven't not- iced, there are only 302 days left in the year. KA Beachcombers Find Strange Bottle, ll. Other Sea Souvenirs By SSgt. John W. Horky Three NCO's of 1400th CAMRON at Keflavik Airport were surprised recently to find a bit of Ireland while on a beachcombing expedition near this northern NATO base. Staff Sgts. Robert F. Calaway"8*— 'and Everett E. Eldridge and SM- BOTTLE FIND SSgt. Robert F. Calaway holds the 200th anniversary Guinness Stout bottle he found while beachcombing near Keflavik Airport. The certifi- cate from "King Neptune" held by SSgt. Everett E. Eldridge was in the souvenir bottle. — U.S. Air Force Photo by A1C Billy N. Thurman. 21 Masters Get Upgrade The chevron counter at the Keflavik Airport Base Ex- change was doing a land-office business Wednesday morn- ing when 21 sergeants were notified of promotion to the "super" grades. Keflavik has an even dozen new chief master sergeants and nine new senior masters. The promotions were effective Mar. 1. Adding their eighth and final stripe were SMSgts. Roy E. Allen, 667th AC&W Sq; Harold F. Beat- ty, Hq Sq AFI; George T. Con- boy, Jr., 932nd AC&W Sq; Fred- erick F. Jones, CAMRON; Char- les W. Kramer, Air Base Sq; Joseph D. Kubilus, CAMRON; Art. J. Langlier, Air Base Sq; Hobert K. Pederson, Hq Sq AFI; Steven P. Wolski, Transportation Sq; Edward C. Faria, Hospital; George M. Whitman, Hospital; and Albert W. Froeschle, 667th AC&W Sq. Moving on up the ladder and adding rocker number one were MSgts. Delos G. Hartwig, CAM- RON; Paul K. Knepp, CAMRON; James Patterson, Hospital; Frank J. Schauffle, Air Base Sq; Ric- hard M. Smith, Supply; J. B. Brooks, Hq Sq AFI; and James O. Tate, Hq Sq AFI. Two masters who have already derosed were also named on the promotion list. They were Bern- ard J. Bookhammer, now at Kees- ler, and Leonard J. McFarland stationed at Englewood, Calif. MATS Flyer Prints Story Of AACS Here An excellent feature, written by a former member of the 1971st AACS Squadron here at Keflavik Airport, is published in the Feb- ruary issue of the MATS Flyer. Written by TSgt Gordon S. Hall, the story graphically brings to fore the importance of remain- ing prepared at all times to carry out the duties assigned. In the story, Hall tells of the preparations of bringing a C-118 with 60 passengers down safely and the manner in which this is accomplished. The setting is snow, very limi- tes visibility, and an aircraft with two engines out. Sgt. Gordon F. Wood were adding to their collections of miscellane- ous sea-tossed objects when Cala- way saw a capped brown bottle. The bottle contained a roll of papers but the unusual design of the somewhat sand-worn glass was what first caught the atten- tion of the beachcombers. The in- Better Wait! Air Forces Iceland received the MATS Outstanding Unit Award for its perfect flying safety record in 1960, as stated in the White Falcon last week. Information received here so far indicates this is a MATS flying safety award and not the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. However, an inquiry has been sent to Headquarters MATS requesting clarification. AFI personnel are, therefore, cautioned not to wear the rib- bon indicating award of the USAF decoration until the final word is received. scription read "1759 - 1959 — Special Bottle Drop (Atlantic Ocean) to celebrate and commem- orate Guinness Bicentenary —- 1959." The contents of the bottle in- cluded a special 200th anniversary Guinness Stout label and a color- ful certificate "From the office of King Neptune." It granted per- mission to "the House of Guinness to cast in, and/or upon my Dom- ain the bottle carrying this docu- ment . . . ." Among the other papers in the bottle were instructions on how to make a lamp with the com- memorative bottle, information on "labology"—the collecting of bot- tle labels, and an advertisement for Ovaltine. The bottle also included inter- esting information on the brew- ers of the beverage celebrating its 200th anniversary, such as the fact that the first Arthur Guin- ness leased a brewery at St. James's Gate, Dublin, in 1759— for a period of 9,000 years! Beachcombing is one of the les- (See Beachcombers, Page i.) Extremely AAild Winter Ending; Much Less Snow Than Is Usual This past winter has been one of the mildest at Keflavik Air- port in nine years. Only 26 inches of snow were recorded through the end of February, while it is usual to have up to 46 inches by this time of the year. Temperatures below 20 degrees occurred on only five days this winter, with a low of 17 degrees recorded on Feb. 4 and 5. The ex- treme minimum recorded in pre- vious years was four degrees. Winds during the past winter were about normal, as was total precipitation. However, because of the mild temperatures most of this fell as rain rather than snow. The maximum average depth of snow on the ground was seven inches on one day before Chris- mas. On only two days were there four inches or more of snow on the ground. In most winters at Keflavik Airport there are at least a few days with 10 to 15 inches of accumulated snow. The few spring-like days tow- ard the end of February may have led some to believe the wint- er was over, but the month ended more briskly with frost and ice on the morning of the 28th. The outlook for March? Based on previous years' experience the temperature could range between extremes of 10 to 55 degrees with a mean of 35. However, whole months of March have averaged as low as 27 degrees and as high as 44 in Reykjavik. An average March at Keflavik Airport has brought seven days of snow totaling eight inches. There are also chances of snow in April. During March daylight will in- crease substantially from 10 hours and 12 minutes to 13 hours and 26 minutes. This extremely mild winter was similar to that of last year. The winters of 1951-52 and 1952-53 were also relatively mild, with six intervening winters of more severity. Long range predictions of the Keflavik Airport weather station a joint Icelandic-American opera- tion, call for more snow and cold- er weather for the next two wint- U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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The White Falcon

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