The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 02.04.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 02.04.1965, Blaðsíða 1
NATO Celebrates Anniversary AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 13 Friday, April 2, 1965 DEPARTURE—RAdm Ralph Weymouth bids farewell to Dr. Eugene G. Fubini, Deputy Director, Assistant Secretary of Defense in the office of Research and Engineering in Washington, following a heli- copter tour of the Naval Station. (Photo by Lang, PHAN) Weymouth Welcomes Fubini; Tours Base Via Helicopter Dr. Eugene G. Fubini, U.S. Deputy Director in the office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, layed over in Keflavik last Monday on his way to the United States. Part of the group accompanying Mr. Fubini were RAdm Noel A. Gaylor, Naval Operations; Dr. John L. McLucus, Deputy Director Tactical Warfare Programs; and Brig. Gen. William T. Ryder, in the De-'^ partment of Secretary of De- fense. Mr. Fubini was returning from Germany where he met with re- presentatives of the German Min- istry of Defense to discuss pro- jects of mutual interest. Admiral Gaylor had spent time in Rome where he had talked to officials of the Italian Navy con- cerning projects of operations and certain operational ideas with the Italians. RAdm Ralph Weymouth ac- companied Mr. Fubini and Ad- miral Gaylor on a helicopter tour of the Naval Station. After see- ing the base, Admiral Gaylor said, "My impression is that the people here are working very long hours and very effectively to make a completely unique contribution to the security of the free world." IMavy Lab On Ice Island ARLIS-II Nears Iceland A drifting arctic ice island on which the Navy operates a scientific laboratory as part of its arctic research program, has begun a historic transit of the Greenland Sea. Now about 35 nautical miles off the coast of Greenland, the ice island's course southward toward the Atlantic Ocean has permitted the study of an area which surface ships have never penetrated in winter and only rarely in the summer months. Known as ARLIS-II (Arctic Research Laboratory Ice Station) the ice island is two miles long, one and a half miles'* wide, and is 50 to 60 feet thick. The ARLIS-II project is main- tained and supported by the of- fice of Naval Reasearch under the management of University of Alaska. The floating laboratory was established in May, 1961, when it was about 130 miles north of Point Barrow. Since then, it has followed a meandering path until it is now about 2400 miles from the point where it was first manned. Its normal complement is 12 to 15 men, including scientists and support personnel. Only once before has a manned drifting ice station traversed the Greenland sea. A Russian sta- tion, NtP-1, made the trip in 1937- 38. NP-1 was an ice floe—which is smaller and less stable than an ice island. Only one other ice island has ever been inhabited by the U. S. for arctic research — Fletcher's Ice Island, or T-3— which is also operated by ARL for the Navy and is presently drifting between Point Barrow and ARLIS-II. The drift of ARLIS-II through In This Issue NATO Anniversary ... Pg. 3 U.S.O. Show ......... Pg. 4 Youth Carnival ....... Pg. 5 New Pay Raise....... Pg. 6 Aurora Borealis Phenomena—Good Or Evil? Personnel of the Iceland Defense Force here in Keflavik are in one of the most ad- vantageous geographical locations in the world to observe one of nature's most unusual sky phenomena—the Aurora Borealis, commonly known as the Northern Lights. A glance skyward during almost any cloudless night will reveal the aurora resplen- dent in a dazzling spectacle of colors: white, pink and red—with others changing from pale to deep green and yellow. In shape, color and motion, the polar lights play varied and fascinating roles, all incident to the electric discharges1*' the Greenland Sea provides the U. S. with the first opportunity to study in detail this relatively unknown geographic area. The Greenland Sea is particularly significant to the Navy since it provides an important deep water access route for submarines into the Arctic Ocean. It is also scien- tifically important because it in- cludes the broad transition zone where cold Arctic waters and warmer Atlantic waters are known to mix. There are currently five research programs in progress aboard ARLIS-II: 1. A program, conducted by the Naval Oceanographic Office as (Continued on page 8*) Rate Cycle Changed; Affects E-^s-E-T's For those who took the fleet-wide examination for rating last Feb. 4, their advancement may well be affected by the new advancement increments set up by the Navy. Rather than the two advancement increments of each six months cycle, there will now be one increment each month. Men will be advanced in** ratings on the 16th of May and in the very rare, high and ex- ceedingly ionized atmosphere. While some observers and learned men down through the ages have disagreed about the ef- fects of a glowing midnight sun, today's scientists conclude that the aurora is neither harmful in itself, nor the harbinger of evil as had been suspected in years back. Location Of Aurora The aurora are most frequently found at about 60 degrees longi- tude over the North American continent and the Atlantic Ocean and around 70 degrees north over Siberia. The northern lights can not be seen against a daylight sky, although they do appear in day- time. However, due to the great glare of the sun, the sight is blocked from view. To the human eye, the lights are strictly a nocturnal pheno- mena and for this reason may be seen during the winter months more often because there are so many hours of darkness. Size and Shape As seen against the heavens, aurora may be seen as arcs, bands, curtains, coronas, patches or dif- fused glows. The rays are some- times stationary, simply appear- ing and disappearing without seeming to move. At other times there is rapid motion and they seem to shoot rapidly upward and recede. One of the most unusual dis- plays of the Northern Lights was seen west of Norway on Sept. 18, 1926. It appeared to be an arc to the eye, but photos showed it to be composed of a curtain of rays. The diffused form of the aurora reached the height of 600 miles. Calculations proved this, although normally they have an upper limit of about 250 miles and a lower limit of about 50 (Continued on page 8.) each month thereafter, through Oct. 16. The present examining system provides for two increments per advancement cycle. This system has proved to be unsatisfactory for purposes of proper personnel management. The requirement for maintaining the maximum strength within the limitations of the petty officer ceiling has been difficult due to the fluctuations in numbers and ratings of petty officers on board. In addition, and of great im- portance, the maximum number of advancements cannot be re- liably accomplished. In order to alleviate these un- desirable effects, advancements will be authorized on a monthly basis. The six increments per examination cycle will commence with the February 1965 exam cycle. It will affect pay grades E-4 through E-7. Advancement procedures for pay grades E-8 and E-9, however, will not be affected by the new system. Personnel to be advanced will be included in the appropriate in- crement on the basis of their final multiple standing. The highest of the final multiples will be on the first increment and then in de- scending order on subsequent in- crements from the higher to the lower multiples. The U.S. Naval Examing Cen- ter will issue one Rating Ad- vancement Letter, about April 1, containing advancement authority for all increments. Plus a listing of personnel who passed the ex- aminatin but were not selected for advancement and a listing of personnel who have failed to ob- tain a passing score on the axarn<- ination. Efforts will be made to author- ize the maximum number of. ad- vancements, as early as possible, in each advancement cycle. White Falcon Rated Eighth The Naval Station's newspaper, The White Falcon, has been se- lected by the Armed Forces' Writers League (AFWL) as one of the "top ten" sea services publi- cations for 1964. The judging was decided by a panel of military and civilian journalists in Washington. Twenty publications competed in the final judging from a field of more than 500 sea services papers. With 900 points possible, Ser- vice Force Pacific's (SERVPAC) Information Bulletin won AFWL's "Silver Anchor Trophy" as best sea service newspaper with a score of 722. The White Falcon received a score of 654 for eighth place. The papers were judged on the following: readership interest, local news and command informa- tion coverage, balance between local and wider-interest news, sports and recreational events, intelligent use of filler material, layout and typography, repro- duction, photos and artwork, fea- ture and column material and use of available resources.

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