The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 12.11.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 12.11.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE "WHITE Dallas (Dim. U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 42 Friday, November 12, 1965 THIRD AWARD—Congratulating MSgt. Joseph S. Bloomstein upon receipt of his third Commendation Ribbon is Lt. Col. Frank J. Piet- ryka, Commanding Officer, 932nd AC&W Squadron. The Commander's Call ceremony took place at Rockville on Oct. 28. Rockville 'Recruiter' Receives Third Commendation Medal An impressive ceremony at Rockville marked the award of the third Commendation Medal to Msgt. Joseph S. Bloom- stein. The presentation was made, Oct. 28, at a Com- mander's Call conducted by Lt. Col. Frank J. Pietryka, com- mander of the 932nd Aircraft Control and Warning Squad- ron (932nd AC&W). Sergeant Bloomstein was cited for his exemplary per- formance of duty while serving as ^~ a recruiting supervisor in Rhode Island and Southeast Massachu- setts. As an Air Force recruiter and recruiting supervisor he has been responsible for the enlistment of over 3,000 men and women in the U.S. Air Force. Outstanding Supervisor He was Outstanding Supervisor in the 3501st United States Air Force Recruiting Group. He was also the first in Air Force history to consecutively be recognized as the Most Outstanding Supervisor in a competing, nation-wide field of 220 recruiting supervisors. In 1956 he was awarded tne Army Commendation Medal for the logistic planning and execu- tion of a six months self-sustain- ing supply program for a flying ------------------¦ m i----------------- Brother's Namesake Christened By Nun The destroyer escort O'Callahan was launched at Bay City, Mich., Oct. 20. Sister Rose Marie, of the Mary- knoll College, Republic of the Philippines, was selected to christen the ship. She is the sister of Capt Joseph T. O'Callahan, the Navy chaplain for whom the ship is named. Sister Rose Marie is the first nun to sponsor a Navy ship. (AFPS) In This Issue McNamara's Message .. pg. 2 Editorial ............. pg. 2 Sports................pg. 3 Photographer's Story .. pg. 4 Entertainment ........ pg. 4 squadron operating in the Aleu- tian Islands. Enjoys Recruiting Sergeant Bloomstein, a native of Brockton, Mass., where his wife and two children reside, is presently assigned to the 932nd's Materiel Control Section. Ask him about recruiting duty and one will find he has every in- tention of returning as soon as his tour is completed. His motto, "Always tell them the truth; they may outrank you in the immediate future," is worth remembering. Winter Exams Show Promise Here's good news for most per- sonnel taking the February exams for advancement in rate. The Bureau of Naval Personnel has issued a forecast of enlisted ad- vancement opportunities. Overall, prospects are bright, though in certain specialties ad- vancement hopes for E-6 and E- 7 will be lessoned. It looks like the good news outweighs the bad, how- ever, and February exams should produce an average crop of happy "rate-grabbers." Weighing all available factors, figures would indicate 65,000 petty-officer promotions, that's 35,000 E-4s, 18,000 E-5s, 8,000 to E-6 but only 4,00 to E-7. Seven ratings have excellent a- cross the board opportunities these are AX, CT, DS, EA, ET, FTG, and MA. Unfortunately, two ratings are considered very poor advancement wise. These are ADR and ML. So, good luck to those of you who are taking the exams; let's make Keflavik advancements 100%. Compensation Review A continuous review of mili- tary compensation, including pay, will be handled by a new division under the Army's Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel. The Military Compension Review Division will work with the other services and the Department of Defense studying all elements of military pay, an official said. Creation of the division resulted in an augmentation of Army "action" personnel numbering four officers, two enlisted person- nel and two civilian employees. Division chief is Col. Leo E. Benade, former chief of the Army's Promotion and Retention Division and the Advanced Stu- dies Group. (AFPS) Highway 'Second Snatchers' Gamble Against Big Odds Are you gambler? What are your chances of having a driving accident during the next twelve months? Think about statistics: If you drive more than 12,000 miles per year, your chances are one in three. However, if you only drive 8,000 to 12,000 your odds are better. You have one in five. Your odds go up. Even here in Keflavik, where the average driver travels less than 8,000 miles per year, your chances are still one in ten. You can increase your chances of survival on the road by de- fensive driving and good judge- ment. The following are a few risks a typical driver takes on his way to and from work and the time- saved in each instance. Pulling into the roadways ahead of fast moving traffic saves about five seconds. Making a rolling stop with only a glance in each direction saves another five seconds. (That STANZ means STOP) Approaching an intersection without slowing down will save another five to ten seconds. Rounding a curve without slow- ing down will get you another ten seconds. You may save ten more seconds by following the vehicle in front of you real close, to make pas- sing faster. Speeding to pass a vehicle which has slowed down also saves you ten seconds. Failure to check blind spots at windshield, rear window, and door post before pulling into an inter- section or changing lanes saves another ten seconds. If you take all these chances you can save yourself a whole minute. Think of the additional time you can save by other thoughtless acts, if you make it. Really, here in Iceland, is time that precious? Is your life worth only 60 seconds? (NavNews) MOTHERS GAIN RANK—Mothers of these two First Class Scouts receive miniature replicas of their son's pins at ceremonies held Nov. 2 at the Youth Center during the Boy Scouts' Court of Honor. Awarding pins to their moms are Danny Frazier to Mrs. Frazier (left), and Lyndon Whitmer to Mrs. Whitmer (right), while SSgt. Logan J. Frazier (far left) looks proudly on. (Photo by Wirth, PH3) Scout Troop Honors Mothers And Scouts? The Boy Scouts of Troop 364 at U. S. Naval Station, Keflavik, Iceland held their Court of Honor on Nov. 2 at the Youth Center. Among the merit badges given to the scouts, was the awarding of miniature rating pins to their mothers. It was also the first Court of Honor for incoming Scout- master Lon Hayes and the last one for outgoing Scoutmaster Horace A. Covington, who presented the Star Award and the merit badges. „<S^ Receiving the Star rank were Mike and Bill Hayes; First Class Scout badges went to Danny Frazer and Lyndon Whitmer; while the rank of second class scout was given to Pat Scott. Tenderfoot Scouts The young men who attained Tenderfoot Scout, were Ricky Jensen, Eddie Baker, Russell Dworzack, Dale Voris, Ronald Powell, Larry Farless, Bucky Buchanan, Paul Pietryka and Willie Grover. Three merit badge catagories were also presented during the event. Receiving their swimming mer- in badges were Lyndon Whitmer, Brian Loher and Mike and Bill Hayes. First Class Scout Brian Loher was also presented two merit badges, one for horseman- ship, the other for metalwork. 1966 Charter Presented Chaplain Robert G. Brown, re- presenting Chaplain Robert E. Blade as institutional representa- tive, accepted the 1966 Charter for Scout Troop 364. Chaplain Brown presented the charter to Capt. T. J. Bratten, Jr., Troop Committee chairman, who in turn handed the document to Scoutmaster Hayes. It is now being displayed in the scoutmaster's office at the Youth Center. The Boy Scouts of Troop 364 meet at the Youth Center every Tuesday evening at seven during the month of November. Anyone interested in scouting can contact Lon Hayes, RMC, or Horace A. Covington, RM1, at ext. 6238. &-VftJ___ "B" SCHOOL BOUND—Shipping over for six more years and bound for 12 weeks at Air Con- trolman's "B" School, Glynco, Ga., in August 1966 is Kenneth W. Montgomery, AC2. The ceremoni- es were performed by Capt Emile E. Pierre, Jr., commanding officer of the Naval Station, in his office Nov. 5. Montgomery is attached to the Air Operations Department as a dispatcher for MATS flights. He also handles and processes flight plans for aircraft flying out of Keflavik Airport. (Photo by Singer, AN)

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