The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 27.09.1941, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 27.09.1941, Blaðsíða 2
PAGE 2 THE WHITE FALCON THE WHITE FALCON Published each Saturday by and for the American Forces in Iceland. PFC. Edward Murray, Jr. Managing Editor. PFC. Peter T. Macy, News Editor. PFC. Donald A. Sidenberg, Circulation Manager. This paper has been passed by the censor and may be mailed home for one cent. THE EYES UPON US U.S. Army arrives in Iceland. These words were written across the front pages of hund- reds of newspaper in the Unit- ed States last week. Its signi- ficance grew; and into many languages and scores of for- eign countries these same words were given to millions of people. It turned the eyes of a quest- ioning world upon us. Americ- an troops were now close to the scene of a war-torn contin- ent and their country —: at peace with all nations. To those of us who compris- ed this American force these words meant work, courage, self-restraint and the will to carry out a mission dedicated to the security of our loved ones at home. We carry no illusion of grandeur — no hope for glory. But we abound in a feeling of pride that our task should be so momentous. Come whatever obstacles may, we will not equivocate; for it is not our desire to do so. Our feet tread upon the ground of a kind, courageous and peace-loving country, small in population, but rich in its heritages of noble sons. We Americans have much in common with the Icelanders, and their just laws will become our laws and their rightful re- quests — our desire to grant. We will find comparative ease in making ourselves well liked by just being good Americans. Each officer and soldier by his thoughts and actions will become the guardian of Ame- ican principles. When the day comes for our departure fom these shores we will, by this code, leave behind a people whose hearts and minds will bear only respect and kindness for America. Let, then, the eyes of the world be upon us. Lessons in Icelandic By Lieut. Dori Hjalmarsson LESSON NO. 1 The Icelandic language is a phonetic one. For this reason it is essential that the beginning student master the phonetics of each letter of the alphabet. It will be observed that the phone- tics of a letter "hold quite consistently throughout. It is partic- ularly important to master the pronounciation of the vowels for therein, perhaps, lies the most marked difference from that of English. Also the two additional letters p and d. Observe also that modern Icelandic does not have the English, C, Q or W. .The open a writen as se and the pronunciation of the vowel combinations au, ei, and ey are also to be noted. In pronunci- ating words bear in mind that the accent almost invariably falls on the first syllable. The vowels and consonants are given, below in separate groups. It is suggested that those who care to follow the less- ons in succeeding issues of this paper, preserve the alphabet as given for future reference. VOWELS AND COMBINATIONS. ' Letter Icelandic name Key English sou nd Icelandic word a ah father hattur — hat a ow now sal — soul e eh let detta — fall' e ye (None) fe — sheep i i (short) hit finna — find i ee seem Reykjavik 0 o (short) not oddur — point 6 oe toe skoli •— school 6 oy toy gjora ¦— make u u (short) full munnur — mouth u 00 moon skiir — shower se (open a) I mile maeta — meet au oi oil auga — eye ei or ey ei weigh Reykjavik y (Not vowels as such but treated as the letters i and i) y (respectively) CONSONANTS. Letter Icelandic name English word Icelandic word b bje boat bok — book d dje do eldur — fire 8(J) eth bathe a&rir — others f eff fife fara - go or start or gje gold gata - road, path h ha (how) he hann — he J jotS (yoth) yes telja — count k ka (kow) kernel kser — dear 1 el loan sol — sun 11(2) eddl (None) ull — wool m em man heima — at home n en never enskur - English P pje pot skip — ship r err roll riki — state s ess house Island — Iceland t tje took vatn — water V vaff veer verja — defend X ex extra strax —„at once y i (treated as vowel s i and i) yfir — over y i (respectively) ? ymis — various z r': seta zero bezt — best K3) boddn thin prottur — power NOTE: :(i) 8 is treated as tri. Appears within and at end of words. (2) Not a letter but included as sound of 11 is consistently eddl. (3) b Added letter appears 1 at bebginning of words usually is the English th and rs ; at beginn ing of words usually ICELANDERS First Settlers in America According to reliable sagas Leif Ericson left Norway for Greenland in the year 1000 A.D. He was the son of the great exile and colonist, Eric the Red, and was commission- ed by the ruler of Norway to carry Christianity to Green- land. Shortly before Leif reach- ed Greenland a terrific storm arose .and he was blown far south of his course. When the storm had cleared he was amazed to see land stretching out to the west. He immediate- ly went on shore to find what manner of country this was. He found abundant plant and tree growth all of which was totally unfamiliar to him. In his crew, however, was one old man who had lived in cont- inental Europe and who recog- nized at least one species — the grape or "wine berry". From this fact America became known in the north as "Vin- Iand" or "Wine land". Leif re- turned to Greenland and spread word of his discovery. The stories, travelling by the songs of the wandering minstr- els reached Iceland and fired the imagination of at least one adventurer there. This was Thorfinn Karlsefni who in 1004 with other Icelanders arrived in Vinland and settled. These colonists lived in America for three years during which time the first white child — an Ice- lander, was born in America. Thorfinn and his colonists were finally driven out by the uncompromising Indians and returned to Iceland. So ended what appears to be the first white settlement in the new world — a settlement made by Icelanders. A less reliable saga tells us, that America was first sighted by Bjarni Hjerulfsson, who did not land, but carried the tale back with him to inspire the voyage of Leif Ericson. It is well established that in 1477 Christopher Columbus visited Iceland, but whether he was engaged in gathering data for his proposed trip at that time is unknown. In all events it is now a rarely disputed fact that a Norseman discovered Amer- ^ ica and Icelanders were its first white settlers. So, as a small child greets his white bearded grandsire, we, the sons of the new world salute venerable Iceland.

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