The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 23.01.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 23.01.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon • Volume XXXII. Number 3 Ketlavk, Iceland January 23. W6 Det 3*s gain AF reservists tour locally Five Air Force Reservists assigned to the 79th Airborne Early Warning and Con- trol Squadron (AEW&C) at Homestead AFB, Florida, are the first members of their unit to begin temporary deployments with the 552nd AEW&C Group to Detachment 3 at Keflavik. The reservists are: Major Glen E. Mowl, First Lieutenant Henry L. Ferrel, Master Sergeant John T. Conlin, Technical Sergeant Dauphin R. Womak-and Staff Sergeant David R. Bilodeau. The deployments of the reservist air- crews are designed to give them practi- cal experience in North Atlantic airborne radar surveillance operations. On April 1, with the deactivation of the 552nd AEW&C Group at McClellan AFB, Cali- fornia, the 79th AEW&C Group deacti- vates, many of its resources will be moved to Homestead AFB and reassigned as Detachment 1 to the 20th Aerospace Defense Squadron. The 552nd's Detach- ment 3 here at Keflavik will be redesig- nated "Operating Location AA" (OLAA). At that time the reservists will compli- ment detachment personnel during opera- tional missions in Florida and in the North Atlantic. EC-121 aircraft have operated in Ice- land since late 1968 providing airborne radar surveillance for AFI and NATO. Navy picks up CPO alternates The Chief of Naval Personnel has au- thorized the selection of a group of E-8 and E-9 alternate candidates from the March 1975 Selection Board, to be placed in the selectee status. The decision to pick up these alter- nates was based on what the Bureau cal- led larger than planned losses in the senior enlisted grades. A total of 159 active E-7's from ratings that are presently undermanned in the senior chief grades are on the list, and 59 E-8's on active duty are on the list for nine. In addition, the Bureau has listed 16 TAR's for the list of E-8 selectees and two E-8 TAR's for promotion to Master Chief. The Bureau points out, however, that these alternates placed on the selectee list, will be advanced only after all the primary candidates in their ratings have been advanced. Sailors of the year screening begins Screening has- begun for the FY76 "Sailors of the Year" competition. The program is open to all active duty Navy Petty Officers Third Class through First Class. Three individuals will be chosen for the honor, one each from the Pacific and Atlantic Fleets, and one from the Navy shore establishment. Each "Sailor of the Year" will be meritoriously promoted to the next high- er paygrade, provided minimum time in rate and length of service requirements are fulfilled. Winners and their dependents receive an all-expense paid trip to Washington, D.C., for the awards ceremony from the Fleet Reserve Association. An optional five-day rest and relaxation period in CONUS also will be offered to the win- ners. Fleet winners will be given the opportunity to serve one year as assis- tant to their respective Master Chief Petty Officer of the Fleet, while the shore establishment winner may serve one year with the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Naval Education and Training Command. Further details on the "Sailor of the Year" program are contained in BUPERSNOTE 1700 of Dec. 16, 1975. HIDDEN HAZARDS IN THE SNOW range from dangerous projections under the white blanket...to the sudden loss of control of vehicles attempting to navigate the deceptively serene landscape. Chains and four-wheel drive may make the going easy, but stopping and maneuvering capabilities aren't missed until they are needed—which may be too late. Alpha limited--Bra\ ()--(Charlie The A-B-Cs of winter driving (or the true confessions of a snow person) by JOCS James Johnston I hadn't been out more than five min- utes Wednesday morning when my car got stuck — firmly and embarrassingly — in less than six inches of snow. It's frustrating...maddening, espe- cially for those of us who grew up in areas where three to four feet of snow from late November until March is a way of life. I often wonder what people from the South think.of snow driving. Wednesday morning was the fourth time I'd been stuck in less than three weeks. One morning I didn't even get out of the parking lot. But one of those times it wasn't my fault I got stuck: You see, we were in ALPHA LIMITED and most of the roads had been plowed — sure the wind was up a little, and visibility was near zero, with the blowing snow and all...but I really wanted to go to the laundry. How was I to know the roads were icy and slick...and after more than a year here, surely I know where the roads curve.... No, it wasn't my fault that day...it was the ice and blowing snow...I didn't see the curve, and thinking about something else, I forgot it was there. I didn't go all the way in the ditch, so four guys helped me push the car back onto the road. Someone is probably thinking, had I used a little common sense that day, I probably wouldn't have gotten stuck, right? Well, everyone knows, we don't have to think.' That's what the traffic conditions are for: ALPHA LIMITED: Traffic proceeds as required by existing conditions, but at reduced speed of 20 m.p.h. BRAVO: Permits movement of emergency and essential traffic, at reduced speed. Essential traffic is defined as official vehicles, service vehi- cles, buses and private vehicular traffic necessary to proceed to and from work. When this condition is in effect, snow tires or chains are.re- quired as a safety measure. CHARLIE: Permits movement of emer- gency vehicles only, at reduced speed. In general, emergency vehicles are defined as ambulances, fire de- partment vehicles, command and duty officer cars, private vehicles on recall and snow removal equipment. Hmmmm. Maybe I was wrong. After reading those... I thought the traffic conditions told us what the weather was like, but now I see...They don't say anything at all about weather or road conditions, do they? Maybe we are sup- posed to think! You know what I really think? If we would think and cooperate, there are very few days when we need more than an command would have commit- ALPHA LIMITED traffic condition. From my point of view, when we think traffic condition BRAVO should be set, or when the traffic condition is set, there is a mass panic. It's similar to what I've observed in Washington, D. C, when the first snowflake falls (an event which creates a mass exodus of govern- ment employees in a state of panic). Recently, the command has set modi- fied Bravo condition in a vain effort to clear the roads and parking lots for us. It was vain, because an effort like that requires all hands cooperation. It set off a clamor of phone calls and a state of panic. Cars jammed roads and parking lots, and the snow removal crews just couldn't work. Now, suppose we had stayed in ALPHA LIMITED and used our common sense — I can't imagine anyone who didn't abso- lutely have to drive, driving on days like some of the past few have been. Had we stayed off the road, let the snow plows do their work, and gone about our business rather than trying to sec- ond guess those who must make level decisions, things probably have run smoothly, and we could gone on with our schedules and ments. Let's try it. We cooperate very well on everything else. But if you must drive, please remember these points: - vehicles cannot stop effectively on ice. - melting ice is often slicker than frozen ice. - chains and studded as effective on ice as are on dry roads. - high winds affect braking - brakes work better on ice are pumped. - black ice is almost impossible to see, and is very dangerous. - blowing snow can make vehicles in front of you disappear. - drifting snow often makes it impos- sible for two vehicles to pass. - pedestrians are sometimes very hard to see. - slow and cautious driving can make the above points academic. - Snow Removal equipment always has the right-of-way. It takes more than one sweep-to clear an area. - Traffic Condition ALPHA LIMITED doesn't mean we don't have to think ...in drifting snow or when the roads are icy, don't go unless you abso- lutely must. - Help others if they get stuck. Thanks for hearing me out. I'm tired of getting stuck. I'm going to have to re-think why that happens. tires are not regular tires if they IDF Prayer breakfast to beheld The Iceland Defense Force National Prayer Breakfast will be held at the Top of the Rock Thursday at 8 a.m., in con- junction with the National Prayer Break- fast sponsored by the U.S. Senate and House Prayer Groups. The breakfast is founded on the idea that persons in positions of responsibi- lity can meet together in prayer to re- dedicate themselves to the moral and spiritual values upon which our nation is founded. In Washington, the Presi- dent, Vice-President, Cabinet and mem- bers of Congress are expected to attend along with other dignitaries. In Ice- land all military and civilian personnel regardless of rank or rate are invited to attend and unite themselves in prayer for our nation and leaders on this 200th year of our United States. Rear Admiral Harold G. Rich, Commander ' Iceland De- fense Force, will be the guest speaker. Tickets are on sale for $1 by repre- sentatives of each command or at the Base Chapel. Personnel are requested to purchase tickets before Wednesday in or- der for seating arrangements to be com- pleted. Recruiting duty mandatory for selected POs The Chief of Naval Personnel has authorized the assignment of non-volun- teers E-6 and above to recruiting duty. The move was necessitated by critical manning levels at a number of recruiting districts. Personnel will be assigned to the districts by BUPERS, but, in most cases further assignment to recruiting stations will be made by district com- manding officers. Personnel selected will be screened in accordance with provisions of the en- listed transfer manual and must meet the same standards as volunteer recruiters. Recruiters are eligible for up to $150 per month special duty assignment pay. Bl'PKRS announces discharge changes The Bureau of Naval Personnel has announced a series of changes to admin- istrative discharge procedures. The modifications, effective April 1, will provide the individual with the opportunity to obtain legal assistance during most discharge proceedings. In cases where individuals are being involuntarily discharged and their per- formance marks would warrant a general discharge, they must be .given the oppor- tunity to consult with a lawyer. The processing documents must include infor- mation as to whether the service member requested or waived counsel. Previously, if an individual request- ed a lawyer and one was not available, non-lawyer counsel could be substituted. Under the modified procedures, if legal counsel is not available the discharge Toceedings must be suspended until a lawyer is available. In a separate change, the reasons for discharge for "unfitness" and "miscon- duct" are being incorporated into a sin- gle category. All personnel being pro- cessed under Article 3420220 of the BUPERS Manual (unfitness) will now be processed under the new misconduct article. Full details on the discharge pro- cedure changes are contained in BUPERS Note 1910 of Dec. 9, 1975.

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The White Falcon

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