The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 06.02.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 06.02.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII. Number 5 Kertavic. Iceland February 6, 1976 Are vou ready? Inspections continue Today is the fifth day of the annual auto inspections. Traffic through building //T-550, the inspection site, has been sparse in comparison to the number of vehicles scheduled. A Secu- rity Department spokesman estimates 1500 vehicles will be processed. The slow flow of traffic indicates that some owners may be planning to bring their vehicles in on stragglers' day, after the date of the scheduled in- spection. If this is the case, those owners may be in for more difficulty than they are prepared for due to the amount of traffic expected on that day. Vehicle inspection and registration is done in a one-stop operation at T-550 from 1:15 to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. The JO-licensed autos scheduled for this week are as follows: Today 3398-3732 Wed. 4371-4583 Mon. 3734-4061 Thurs. 4585-4803 Tue. 4062-4368 Fri. 4806-5001 Major causes for inspection failure so far have been brake and light prob- lems. Brake adjustment checks prior to inspection time may save a return trip. A quick check of all lights—parking, brake, turn signals and headlamps—will allow owners to identify and correct burned-out or otherwise defective parts before inspection time. Another timesaving suggestion from the inspection officials involves the paperwork problem. Many owners appear with stacks of unnecessary paper, and extracting the proper document usually takes a few extra minutes of paper shuf- fling. Proceedings may be speeded up somewhat if owners will separate the ne- cessary documents beforehand. Only the 1975 Icelandic registration certificate, valid driver's license with Icelandic stamp, and proof of insurance (after March 1) are necessary for the inspec- tion. Missing mud flaps, loose bumpers and doors, and other obvious defects have delayed successful completion of pro- ceedings for some drivers. Many of the discrepancies that earn a red or green sticker may be corrected by foresighted owners during an afternoon at the Auto Hobby Shop. Local area mechanics are very busy this time of year and timely re-registration may be less frustrating if available facilities are used and Security Department suggestions are fol- lowed . NOTE: The inspection times are from 1:15 to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. An error in last week's White Falcon may have incon- venienced some car owners. Auto Hobby Shop Pre-check urged The base Auto Hobby Shop is a valu- able resource for industrious automobile owners. This value seems to increase considerably during auto inspection time when local mechanics are extremely busy. Many auto owners have saved time and avoided re-inspections by checking their vehicles for obvious defects at the Auto Hobby Shop—and repairing minor discrep- ancies with the aid of Hobby Shop facil- ities. At least two employees are on duty at the Auto Hobby Shop during hours of operation, according to Everett Doughty, Shop day-manager. The shop is open from 1 to 10 p.m. weekdays and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Sunday hours are from 1 to 6 p.m. Oil changes, minor body repairs, and similar jobs may be accomplished on a "first-come, first-served" basis. Ex- tensive repairs, requiring parts ship- ments, may also be done at the shop by reserving a working space for up to ten days. The shop facilities are adequate to handle the normal flow of traffic, and even the inspection-time increase, so that appointments are not yet necessary. Two dollar bill returns For the first time since 1966, the U. S. Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing will print and issue a two dol- lar bill to add to the ones, fives, tens, twenties and the rest used for le- gal tender. Like many other things this year, the new two dollar bill will take on the Bi- centennial theme. It will feature an engraving of Thomas Jefferson on the front, with a rendition of the signing of the Declaration of Independence on the back. The bill is scheduled to. be issued on April 13, the anniversary of Jefferson's birthday. According to the Treasury Department, the reissuance of the two dollar bill can add a new convenience to our curren- cy system and help in reducing the cost of government. As two dollar bills gradually begin to be substituted for ones, fewer pieces of currency will need to be carried by individuals and small cash transactions will be made easier. The Director of the Bureau of En- graving and Printing estimates that the issuance of the new two dollar note will result in a savings of four to seven million dollars per year in the printing of one dollar bills. The two dollar bill has been on the scene in the United States in one form or another since the Continental Con- gress authorized the issuance of them in 1776. The size and type of note have varied over the years, until they were officially discontinued by the Treasury Department on Aug. 10, 1966. At that time, the reason for discontinuing the bill was cited as low levels of public demand. Now, however, over the past 18 months, there has been an increasing in- terest in a two dollar note expressed by Congress, the American Revolution Bicen- tennial administration, the public and the Federal Reserve System...not to men- tion collectors. So the reissuance has been approved and sometime after April 13, don't be surprised if you get two twos and a one instead of five ones or a five. OER changes made Three significant changes have been made to the Air Force Officer Effective- ness Report (OER) system. The first change is for officers se- lected for promotion who have not yet pinned on their new insignia. They will now receive abbreviated reports, not subject to controls. This applies only if the selection was announced prior to the cycle's closeout date. The second change is that when an additional rater or reviewer makes a change of two or more blocks in the con- trolled section of the new rating form, he must give specific rationale for the change. Previously, a change of only one block required a rationale. These two changes were approved Jan. 1. However, they do not apply to the lieutenant cycle that closes Feb. 29. These changes take effect with the lieutenant colonel cycle closing April 30, and all future cycles. The third change requires reviewers to indicate on the rating form itself the number of reports they evaluate. Reports a reviewer wishes to forward to a higher level for signature must be in- cluded in this total number. THE WINTER SUN DELAYS ITS DESCENT more each day, as if to symbolize the Dawn of 1976. The sun's rays—like the Bicentennial Spirit—will become stronger and more enduring as the summer peak approaches. Sol's greatest glory in 1976 will very nearly coincide with the brilliant climax of America's 200th birthday celebration. Top pilots sought Thunderbirds are recruiting The United States Air Force demon- stration squadron "Thunderbirds" is ac- cepting applications from highly quali- fied officers to fill certain positions. Commander Leader applicants must be in the rank of major or lieutenant colo- nel and be on unconditional flying stat- us with extensive fighter aircraft ex- perience. He must have a minimum total 2500 hours flying time, excluding stu- dent hours, of which a minimum of 2000 hours must be jet fighter aircraft time. Individuals selected for this position will report for duty as Executive Offi- cer in late summer 1976 and assume com- mand January 1977. Applications must be received on or before May 1, 1976. Demonstration Pilot/Narrator posi- tions will be filled by two selected officers for the 1977 team. Applicants must have less than ten years active commissioned service as of December 31 of the selection year and be on uncondi- tional flying status. A minimum of 1000 hours rated jet fighter or jet trainer aircraft experience, excluding student and turboprop hours, is mandatory. In- BTZ promotions may come early Up to ten percent of eligible Air Force E-3s may be nominated by their commanders for below-the-zone (BTZ) pro- motion to E-4 six months early. These airmen must have a date of rank within six months of eligibility for "fully qualified" promotion. Once selected by the commander, indi- viduals will appear before a base promo- tion board. Board members will compare those eligible on the basis of appear- ance, military bearing, knowledge of mission, current events, duty responsi- bility, and communicative skills. Airmen unable to personally meet the board will be evaluated on the basis of written comments by their commanders using the same standards. Following the board proceedings, the eligibles will be ranked according to their scores and those above the cutoff will be selected for promotion. Promo- tion quotas will be based on the ratio of the number of eligibles per base to the number of eligibles in the Air Force. BTZ promotions will be made quarterly with the first group scheduled for March 1. Eligibles will be identified by the end of the first week of February, May, August, and November of each year. Base selection boards will meet during the second or third week of the same months. Promotions will be effective the first day of March, June, September, and Dec- ember. dividuals selected will report for duty in the fall of 1976. Applications must be received on or before July 31, 1976. Maintenance officer applicants must be in the rank First Lieutenant or Cap- tain and possess the fully qualified AFSC 4024. An extensive background in unit mobility procedures, organizational and field maintenance functions and pro- cedures, and supply functions and pro- cedures is highly desirable. Indivi- duals selected will report for duty in the summer of 1976. Applications must be received on or before April 30, 1976. Application procedures are covered in AFR 36-20, paragraph 8-22. For further information contact Captain G. M. Matingley, Jr., autovon 682-2277, or Captain James R. Simons, autovon 682- 4115. Black Knights fly to Spain The Black Knights of the 57th FIS were hosted recently by the 613th Tacti- cal Fighter Squadron at Torrejon de Ardoz Air Base. Flying conditions in Spain are well suited for 57th opera- tions. In addition to the several crews that initially flew the planes to Torrejon, more aircrews have managed to take ad- vantage of the flying conditions in Spain by using the rotational support provided by the base C-118 and Det 3's ED-121. Air Force gets first product license The Air Force Surgeon General, Lieu- tenant General George E. Schafer, has announced the Air Force has been granted the first product license in the United States to manufacture and ship human platelet concentrate. The platelets will be produced at the Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center blood bank, Lackland AFB, Texas. Human platelet concentrate is prepar- ed by processing fresh whole blood through a centrifuge within four hours after it is collected. It can be stored at room temperature for up to 72 hours once processed. The concentrate is used in cases of bleeding due to aplastic anemia, leukemia, cancer chemotherapy, radiation injury, and other related con- ditions. It will be primarily in De- partment of Defense military medical facilities. Wilford Hall and four other Air Force medical centers were previously licensed by the Food and Drug Adminis- tration to produce various other speci- fied blood products.

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