The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 21.01.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 21.01.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXIII Number 3 Ketlavik, Iceland January 21, 1977 Youth Center opens its door to 150 visitors - ,..iupW» ¦""v^^PSiiflPIPP^^^ National Prayer Breakfast set SNOOPY PROVIDES ADDED ENTERTAINMENT by welcoming Youth Center open house visitors (top photo), while young ballerinas (bottom photo) perform basic ballet routines. Story and photos by The Youth Center held an open house Sunday. The bill of fare In- cluded various demonstrations, fea- turing classes which the center of- fers to the Naval Station's youth community. The presentations included person- al development, baton twirling, yoga, ballet, tap dancing, tumbling and judo, topped with some refreshments after the demonstrations. Starting with a mini-fashion show, Mrs. Betty Christ's personal develop- ment classes showed how young ladies can bring out the best in charm, poise, character and self-satisfac- tion. The principle of the class is based on bringing out the "inner you." Miss Karen Belin instructed her students in baton twirling to show various attributes of the art. The baton forms included attention, march JOSN Bob Herskovitz and parade rest. Mrs. Eileen Andrieu displayed the mystic Asian ar-t of yoga, with posi- tions like the "lotus." From out of the Zigfield Follies came a chorus line from Mrs. Stella Autrey's dance class, shuffling, tap- ping and generally capturing the eye. Beginning with a simple ballet movement, the troupe showed a few steps in tap dancing as well as som- ersaults, cartwheels and round offs, included in the class repertoire. Judo instructor Ron Hartman led judo students in a demonstration of forward and side falls. After a brief showing of simple flips, the group displayed basic holds and chokes. Refreshments were then served, highlighted by a cake depicting Youth Center activities. Undesirable Discharge Certificate abolished The Secretary of Defense has an- nounced that the military services no longer issued the "Undesirable Discharge Certificate" (DD Form 258) to individ- uals being separated from the Armed Forces. Beginning Jan. 1, 1977, members of the military services administratively separated for misconduct or security reasons (or who resign or request dis- charge for the good of the service when their conduct have made them subject to trial by court-martial) will be issued a "Discharge Under Other Than Honorable Conditions" certificate. This certifi- cate (DD Form 794) has been used in the cases of officers since October 1954. The change was recommended in con- junction with the Department of De- fense's continuing review of its admin- istrative separation systems. No change is being made in issuing "Honorable" or "General" discharge cer- tificates to those who perform success- fully in the service of their country. Also, no change is being made to "Dis- honorable" and "Bad Conduct" discharge certificates, which may be issued as a result of court-martial proceedings. Beginning in June 1977, former mili- tary personnel with Undesirable Dis- charge Certificates (DD Form 258) will be issued DD Form 794, upon application to their former service, in a manner to be announced at a later date. In conjunction with the National Prayer Breakfast, the Iceland Defense Force will sponsor a Prayer Breakfast for military and civilian personnel Thursday at 8 a.m. at the Top of the Rock Club. U.S. Ambassador to Iceland James J. Blake will be the guest speak- er. Each NATO command has an appointed or a designated "key man" from whom an in- dividual can purchase a ticket for the Prayer Breakfast. Tickets can also be purchased at the base Chapel. Cost is $1. Each year since 1953 a National Pray- er Breakfast has been sponsored by the U.S. Senate and the House Prayer Groups. This year's breakfast is scheduled for Thursday and is usually attended by the President and other high ranking govern- ment officials. The Prayer Breakfast occasion is founded on the idea that persons in po- sitions of responsibility can meet to- gether in prayer to rededicate them- selves to the moral and spiritual values on which the United States is founded. It is desirable to focus attention on this event so that military and civil service personnel can join the Command- er-in-Chief for a mutual expression of faith. IRS once demanded 'cheerful* returns from American taxpayers Federal income taxes-due on April 15- have been paid by Americans since Mar. 1, 1914. Long ago they took over from protec- tive tariffs as the number-one money maker to keep the government going. They are what Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes once called "The price we pay for civilization." While taxpayers may wonder whether they are getting their money's worth, economists say taxes are very likely here to stay. It wasn't always that way. In the early years the Nation got along without any income tax. There was serious thought about one to finance the War of 1812, but peace came first. The idea finally took hold with the Civil War. The Confederates never took in very much with their income tax. But Northerners soon found themselves paying for most of the fighting, at the rate of three per cent on all incomes above $600 and five per cent on those above $10,000. The rates gradually dropped and the law expired in 1871. In 1894, the income tax was back in the books. Newspapers gave the story only an inch or two. Others had more to say. Sweet laughter To critics, the income tax was so- cialism incarnate, penalizing thrift, encouraging dishonesty and perjury, bringing on spies and informers and set- ting class against class. To one Congressional supporter, "The passage of this bill will make the dawn of a brighter day, with more sunshine, more of the songs of birds, more of that sweetest music, the laughter of child- ren well fed, well clothed, well housed." But, almost before a bird could tweet, the Supreme Court threw out the income tax because it was a direct tax, outlawed by the Constitution. In 1913, the 16th Amendment of the Constitution overcame this difficulty, and from then on the yearly deadline for income tax payments has been as certain —if different in spirit—as Christmas. The first Form 1040 appeared with that 1914 income tax, the now-famous number which was merely the bureaucratic choice of the new Internal Revenue Bu- reau, now Internal Revenue Service. On filling out the form, one official view loftily proclaimed that "those citizens required to do so can well af- ford to devote a brief time during some one day in each year to making out their returns...willingly and cheerfully." Cheerful or not, it's time to be working on those forms. April 15 will be here sooner than you think. Toastmistress International EMv. 5 vice-president visits NATO Base Toastmistress International Division Five vice-president, Ms. Eva M. Dun of Helensburgh, Scotland, visited the Puf- fin Toastmistress Club and other area clubs this week. Enroute to an international board meeting in Norfolk, VA, Ms. Dun stopped at Keflavik to address the Keflavik or- ganization Tuesday evening. The board, composed of 12 officers and one parlimentarian, meets three times annually. This board, which governs the six Toastmistress International divisions, centralizes club administration, member- ship and problems within the organiza- tion. A 14-year member of the Toastmis- tress Club, Ms. Dun states that the club was founded in the United States in 1937. The club, a Toastmaster counterpart, was begun by a Toastmaster's wife. To encourage public speaking, the club was formed to provide training in all types of speaking situations. During a typical Toastmistress Club meeting, a business session will be held after which impromptu speeches are ren- dered, followed by assigned speeches. By a member's speech-making experi- ence, Ms. Dun explains, self-confidence and poise will be gained, enabling the speaker to inform, entertain or con- vince an audience. On several occasions, an individual Toastmistress will deliver speeches on a variety of subjects at the request of groups. The Puffin Toastmistress Club was es- tablished at Keflavik about four years ago. Since the founding of Toastmistress International, Great Britain was the first country besides the United States to start a club in 1948. Canada also began its Toastmistress organization about that time. Thirty clubs are located in the South African Region, one in Iran, one in Greece and two in Spain. A club will start eventually in India while two clubs, one of which already exists, are proposed at military bases in Germany. Another international club is based at Rotterdam, Holland. Thirty members are usually required to found a local club. The Toastmistress International will host a convention In Washington, D. C. in July. The Puffin Toastmistress Club will meet Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Admin Conference Room.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.