The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 11.02.1977, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 11.02.1977, Blaðsíða 3
F February 11, 1977 Page 3 P-4A trucks increase NATO Base capabilities Two fast-moving, yellow creatures have come to Keflavik. And, the multi- spouted bodies which they possess can ' emanate a powerful stream of a spe- cial substance called "A-Triple-F." These strange-looking newcomers that came to the NATO Base in December 1977, are better known as the P-4A multipur- pose firefighting truck, manufactured by the Oshkosh Truck Corporation. Costing $87,000 each, the trucks can hold 1,500 gallons of water and 180 gal- lons of AFFF foam concentrate which will mix with 3,000 gallons of water. For a refill batch of foam, the P-4A ^akes on more water from a "nurse truck" a hydrant. Likewise, the P-4A may be refilled with foam concentrate from a nurse truck. If needed, the truck may also be re- supplied while actually combatting a fire. To explore the capabilities of the P-4A, key civilian and military fire- fighters from Navy and Marine Corps air facilities in the United States and overseas attended a week of training sessions at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, CA last August. According to the director of Navy fire protection, Bob Darwin, "The beauty of the P-4A is its large capacity and ease of operation." The truck's extinguishing delivery of foam or water may be made through the handline on the truck or its two turrets —one of the roof and the other on the bumper. The handline and the turrets can be used one at a time or together. The roof turret operator can spray 750 gallons a minute. Inside the cab, the driver may con- trol remotely the bumper turret up to 250 gallons a minute. Transportable by C-130 aircraft, the P-4 was developed by Aircraft Ground Fire Suppression and Rescue System, a triservice group charged with develop- ing firefighting equipment. Weighing about 31,000 pounds, the truck weighs about 45,500 pounds when fully loaded, and can move at 50 mph with all accessories. Both cab and body are aluminum and fully insulated; the windshield fea- tures laminated safety plate glass plus defrosters and a pressurized washer system which clears foam from the windshield. Mr. Darwin comments, "The vehicle is operational at temperatures as low as -40 degrees Fahrenheit." TWO FIREMEN REFILL the P-4A fire truck (above). A fireman checks a hatch on top of the truck (left). To demonstrate its fire fighting capacity, Company One members operate the P-4A on a simulated fire run. ^^*W^J^m % What is Black Love? Abraham Lincoln's death retold; subsequent events resurrected On April 14, 1865, Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by actor John Wilkes Booth while sitting in a box in Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C. The result- ing furor over the assassinated Presi- dent and the subsequent events surround- ing the principals in the infamous deed have left a series of mysteries and un- explanable tragedies that perhaps will never be resolved. • Two weeks after the assassination, ooth was cornered by a Union cavalry init in a Virginia farm building. Af- ter he refused to surrender, the troops set fire to the building, but before the flames reached him he was killed by a bullet from a gun wielded by Sergeant Boston Corbett. For most people the entire story be- gins with the shooting of Lincoln and ends with shooting of Booth. But there is far more to the tragic chain of events. Members of Lincoln's party in Ford's Theater included, besides Mrs. Lincoln, the President's aide, Major Rathbone, and the major's fiance, a Miss Harris. Mrs. Lincoln lost her mind after the war, a.surprise to few persons, as she had long been considered an eccentric. Major Rathbone married Miss Harris, and several years later shot and killed his wife and himself. . f Booth's killer, Sergeant Corbett, back in civilian life some years later as a doorkeeper for the Kansas legisla- ture, one day locked the door of the state house chambers and began shooting^ at the lawmakers with two revolvers. When his guns were empty, he was cap- tured and sent to an asylum. Then there was Mrs. Surratt, who was indicted as one of the conspirators who had aided Booth. Tried by a military court and condemined to death, she should have been acquitted, according to the evidence. Friends of Mrs. Surratt, attempting to see President Johnson on her behalf, were barred by two senators—Preston King of New York and James H. Lane of Kansas—by the use of force. They had not been assigned to do this. Several months later, Senator King, who had by then been appointed as a cus- toms collector in New York, weighted himself with lead bars, stepped off a New York harbor ferryboat and drowned. That was on November 12, 1965. Senator Lane killed himself at Fort Leavenwoisth, KS, on July 11, 1866. Lincoln's Secretary of War Stanton died in 1869, supposedly by cutting his own throat, although this was generally denied by friends and relatives. One of the persons who suffered long- est and hardest from the tragedy was the physician who set Booth's broken leg, Doctor Benjamin Mudd. Tried as one of the. conspirators, he was spared the death sentence, however, and was im- prisoned at Fort Jefferson, one of the most isolated areas of the Florida Keys. There he worked hard to save other pri- soners from the trials, rigors and disease of tropical prison life, and eventually was granted a pardon. He died several years later, penniless and in near-obscurity. Finally Congress exonerated him. The doctor left his mark on American history, however, in the everyday ex- pression, "Your name will be Mudd," used as a warning to persons who are about to enter into a risky venture. Niggerchild when yet a young black child asked by a young white child what do you feel how does it feel being a nigger that word meant shame yet young was i not defeated by life a nigger knew no was i me an answer gave i came from my heart a nigger was not me now older that child that once was me a nigger still i yet no longer bring shame a change that life did bring was wonder for now i know to be a nigger is me The Lady The woman I love Is like no other I've known. Temper like an erupting volcano and passions equally as fiery A righteousness Emblazoned with Honesty and Truthfulness. The inner strength of convictions and ever awareness. The inquisitiveness to look for the constant changes of life the intelligence to accept nothing as simple or trite A Beautiful Black Woman Whose Under- standing Is Love The Lady...My Wife. George W. Hall Jr. Cheryl 1 R. Hardison Sgt USAF POSTING THEIR VALENTINES, Ewan Miller and Roberta Bartlett place them in separate boxes.

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The White Falcon

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