The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 22.04.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 22.04.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXIII Number 16 Ketlavik. Iceland April 22, 1977 RAdm Whitmire presents MUC to CFK ASW GrouP> NAVFAC Rear Admiral Daniel B. Whitmore presents the Meritorious Unit Commendation to Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein and Commander Harry W. Benter. (photo by PH2 Ron Pearce) COMPATWINGSLANT visits VP-45 Rear Admiral R. Hedges, Commander Patrol Wings Atlantic Fleet, recently visited the Patrol Squadron FORTY-FIVE "Pelicans" at Naval Station Keflavik. At a morning quarters, RAdm Hedges presented Aviation Ordnanceman First Class James Hayden the award for COMPATWINGSLANT Sailor of the Year as well as the Navy Achievement Medal to Chief Yeoman Roland Achorn. Warrant Officer Bill Skinner was promoted to his present rank. The admiral then gave awards to Aviation Machinist's Mate First Class Vincent Davis and Aviation Electronics Technician Second Class Gary Bearing for being selected VP-45 Supervisor and Sailor of the Quarter, respectively. The admiral toured the Iceland De- fense Force, and met with Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force. VP-45 Commanding Officer Commander S. F. Loftus briefed the admiral on current operations. Following the brief, the admiral was honored with a luncheon. In his remarks to the VP-45 noontime wardroom assembly, he complimented the Pelicans for the outstanding job per- formed in Keflavik. He stated that the entire patrol aviation community benefits from the continued excellence and professional- ism shown by VP squadrons. When asked about the future of the VP mission, the admiral felt that the patrol community would evolve into a multi-mission role. After being selected VP-45 Sailor of the Year, A01 Hayden was named PATWING ELEVEN Sailor of the Year. At Naval Air Station Brunswick, MA, he was interviewed by a panel which included two officers and three master chiefs. When asked by a panel member what he would do if he were Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, he said, "I would try to foster a closer rapport between the Navy's top leader- ship and the guy on the hangar deck. The man turning wrenches needs to hear from the top that he's doing a good job for a good cause." P01 Hayden serves as the squadron's career counselor, and feels that his selection as Sailor of the Year is "a real plus for the younger guys in the squadron." He remarks, "My award, while being a great honor for me personally, serves as a realistic, close-at-hand example for the young sailors to see that the Navy really does recognize and appreciate achievement." During intensive flight operations, Petty Officer Davis volunteered to stay on the job almost 24 hours. His self- less dedication to keeping the squadron flying inspired the rest of the men on his shift to work alongside him around the clock. Davis' division officer, Lieutenant Tim Creath, has nothing but the highest praise for Petty Officer Davis. His style of leadership, along with his demonstrated concern for his men, has made his mid-check shift the most productive. During his off duty hours, Davis attends Los Angeles Community College Overseas. Taking an aviation mainten- ance course, he plans to earn his Federal Aviation Administration air- frames and power plants license upon the squadron's return to Jacksonville, FL. AT2 Gary Dearing also serves as an example of the can-do spirit to which RAdm Hedges referred. Dearing's technical skills often require application beyond his normal work shift. His positive work attitude and mature judgment resulted in his selection as mid-check supervisor over more senior petty officers. Indeed, the whole shop shares in Dearing's award comments Shop Chief J. Bernie Tanner. Chief Tanner ex- plains, "When I was in VP-45 before, I was selected as Sailor of the Month, and I know what a special honor it is for him. All of us in the shop are glad that our work was recognized through Gary's selection." Also at quarters, Rear Admiral Hedges presented a letter of appoint- ment to 'CW02 Skinner. CW02 Skinner enlisted in the Navy in February 1957. He previously served in Iran. Before this assignment, he was stationed at Memphis, TN as a phase supervisor. CW02 Skinner will return to Memphis shortly. He will be tasked with training naval personnel as techni- cians . He plans to complete a bachelor of arts degree in marketing. When eligible, he will apply for the Limited Duty Officer Program. The admiral ended his day with VP-45 by visiting the AW Division. Admiral Hedges spoke about the cur- rent state of military pay and bene- fits. He predicted a moratorium on any additions or deletions to military bene- fits for about a year. He also felt that some type of pack- age proposal for military pay and bene- fits would be presented to Congress in the near future. As a fitting close to his visit, the Pelicans flew RAdm Hedges to his NAS Brunswick headquarters. The personnel of Fleet Air Keflavik/ Iceland Sector Anti-Submarine Warfare Group and Naval Facility Keflavik were awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon Monday. Rear Admiral Daniel B. Whitmire, Deputy Chief of Staff, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, presented the award to Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Fleet Air Keflavik, and Commander Harry W. Benter, Commander Naval Facility, Keflavik. This award recognizes the outstanding performance of these commands during their participation in recent ocean surveillance operations. In the citation from former Secretary of the Navy, J. William Middendorf II, command per- sonnel were commended for their con- tinuous display of professionalism, determination and resourcefulness in Pack-out: It's pack-out time. The movers are coming tomorrow to prepare your house- hold goods for shipment. You've finally completed your tour here and next month you'll be on the rotator. You've got to turn your car into the water terminal tomorrow for transit to Norfolk. Was there anything you forgot to do? The question above might be answered simply, "...no, I'm all ready for the flight home." But, are you? Did a cus- toms representative come to your home and check your household goods and have you sign a customs declaration? Does that car you bought here meet the mini- mum safety and emission control stan- dards? Now, you begin to wonder. Although most persons are vaguely aware that everything entering the states must be cleared for customs , some believe that military personnel are not checked as closely as others. That's a common misconception and the primary reason two customs agents were requested to come to the NATO Base. Mr. Norman Sape and Mr. Clyde Thorn, both based at Norfolk, arrived on station last week to conduct a mini- customs class. Forty-three military personnel from 14 departments and commands attended a three-day class that taught them the requirements and procedures for clearing household effects and automobiles through U.S. Customs when entering the United States. The class attendees, will be certified by the Naval Station as Military Customs Inspectors. Once certified, the in- spectors will begin to check all house- hold goods and cars before they are shipped to the states. They will also offer assistance and advice with all the required paperwork. Everything entering the United States must be cleared by customs. If this clearance is not done before the goods are packed and crated, customs personnel at the port of entry may decide to check for contraband. Household effects must then be un- crated, unpacked and inspected. Once carrying out their mission. The award ceremony began with the arrival of the official party. After the national anthems of Iceland and the United States were played, Rear Admiral Bernstein introduced Rear Admiral Whit- mire. In his remarks, Rear Admiral Whitmire noted, "These commands have performed tasks far beyond what would normally be expected." In addition, he stated, "I was highly impressed with what I saw in the various departments today." The presentation was made at a formal ceremony held at Hangar 831. After presenting the Meritorious Unit Commendation, the ceremony concluded with a cake-cutting by RAdm Whitmire, RAdm Bernstein a*~. '. Commander Benter. It taken more thmn you think the check is complete, everything has to be repacked. This, in effect, means another move and increases the likeli- hood of damage. Automobiles and certain auto equip- ment made on or after January 1, 1968, must conform to applicable federal safety standards. The original manu- facturer is required to affix a label or tag certifying these standards have been met. If this tag is missing, the importer (you) must file a declaration and attach to it a statement from the manufacturer that the auto and equipment meets the standards. Additionally, all passenger cars and light trucks starting with the 1968 model year, must be certified as meeting crankcase and exhaust emission standards. With the 1971 model year, fuel evapora- tive emission standards must also be met. Engines with less than 50 cubic inches are subject only to the crankcase emission standards until the 1973 model. All of this may sound complicated. However, it is important to know that since all your personal effects must be inspected, it is better to have it done prior to shipment than it is to have everything unpacked at the port of entry. The Military Customs Inspection pro- gram will begin soon. When you're ready to pack-out, an inspector will come to your home and help you. This will be coordinated between the Housing Office, Household Goods and the Security Depart- ment. If anyone has questions about what they can or cannot ship, they may call the Security Department for assistance. When you're ready to leave Iceland for your next duty station, you don't need any hassles. The customs inspection pro- gram is just another way to help ensure that your next move will be as trouble- free as possible. It may be your best move yet. Wisdom We must be silent before we can listen; We must listen before we can learn; We must learn before we can prepare; We must prepare before we can serve; We must serve before we can lead. -William A. Ward

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The White Falcon

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