The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 12.08.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 12.08.1977, Blaðsíða 1
Chief sea-shore rotation changes The Chief of Naval operations an- nounced that chief petty officers in all ratings will be affected by the new "maximum 36-month sea tour/minimum 36- month shore tour" program beginning on Oct. 1, 1977. The same program was implemented on June 1, 1977, for chief petty officers in ratings which experienced extra- ordinarily long sea tour in relation to their shore tours. The new program calls for chief petty officers in all ratings and closed loop Navy Enlisted Classification Codes System (NECS) who will complete 19 years of service (day-for-day) by the end of the third year of their current sea/ shore tour will commence a maximum 36-month sea tour or a minimum 36-month shore tour. Because of overseas tour length re- quirements, it is not possible to in- clude women in this program, nor to re- duce the Cryptologic Technician (CT) sea tour to a maximum of 36-months. A one- for-one Continental United States/Out- side the Continental United States (CONUS/OUTUS) tour for CT E-7 throught E-9 after 19 years service (day-for-day) will be accommodated. Women assignments will remain on the CONUS/OUTUS rotation. The present Underwater Demolition Team/Sea Air Land Team (UDT/SEAL) com- munity sea/shore tours must remain in effect because of the large number of sea billets. Eligibility for the foregoing revised sea/shore tour length policy is as follows: Afloat (Type Duty 2) fl) Must be an E-7/8/9 or an E-7 se- lectee at time of assignment from shore or neutral duty. (2) Must complete 19 years of active service (day-for-day) by the end of the third year of his current sea tour. There will be a service adjustment for (continued on pege 3) W/ute^fafam Volume 33 Number 32 VP-24 selects 'Batman' on performance Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Tech- nician William H. Payne was recently selected as Patrol Squadron TWENTY- FOUR'S "Batman of the Quarter." This award is based on a man's proficiency in rate, personal appearance, attitude and behavior. Petty Officer Payne has devoted much time and talent to improve submarine capabilities of both the P-3C "Orion" aircraft equipment and the men who op- erate the gear. As acoustic/non-acoustic training petty officer, Payne instituted a sensor improvement program to ensure that the P-3C's detection gear is continually maintained in a "peaked and tweaked" condition. Payne's assistance in the establish- ment of a sensor-one screening board for all eligible operators has helped im- prove the professional knowledge and overall detection abilities of the men Ketlavik, Iceland August 12, 1977 AW1 Willi am H. Payne who hold this aircrew position. In his off-duty hours, Petty Officer Payne enjoys sports, especially tennis and basketball. His future plans in- clude returning to school in Owensboro, KY to complete his college education. 'Jolly Green Giant' saves West Germany tourists Detachment 14, 39th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing was called on recently to medevac four West German tourists whose Land Rover had overturned on the rugged east coast of Iceland near Hofn. At 9 p.m. Aug. 1, the alert crew of Air Force Rescue 717, an HH-3E helicop- ter, launched and flew toward the inci- dent site. Also called upon was Air Force Res- cue 827, an HC-130, temporarily assigned to Iceland from the 67th Aerospace Res- cue and Recovery Squadron, Woodbridge Royal Air Force Base, England. After intercepting the "Jolly Green Giant" helicopter 40 miles up the east coast, the HC-130 provided much needed fuel to the helicopter. The aerial re- fueling was accomplished by Lieutenant Colonel Covey Campbell, Det. 14 comman- der, despite low clouds and approaching darkness. The "Jolly Green Giant" landed at Hofn, using the rotating lights of the emergency vehicles on the scene as the major visual references. The patients were examined by Dr. (LCdr.) John Bigbee and loaded on board the helicopter for the flight to Reykjavik. Once airborne, Dr. Bigbee, assisted by-two Det. 14 pararescuemen (PJ's) prepared to stabilize the condition of the two most severely injured men. Intravenous fluids were started, and glass particles were flushed from facial wounds; injuries were then dressed. After an hour of giving intensive treatment, the medical team succeeded in getting all victims to respond. Routes through mountainous terrain were navigated by LtCol. Campbell with the assistance of First Lieutenant Richard McGirr, co-pilot, and Staff Sergeant Clint Solt, flight meahanic. Upon arrival at Reykjavik, the pa- tients were loaded on board waiting am- bulances and rushed to nearby medical facilities. At last report, the patients were in good condition and on the road to recovery. Crewmembers of the 67th ARRSq HC-130 included: Captain Chuck.Stueve, pilot; Captain Mike Baghman, co-pilot; Major Robert Call, navigator; Master Sergeant Thomas O'Brien, flight engineer; Staff Sergeant Mateo Martinez, loadmaster; Staff Sergeant Paul Olzewski, radio operator, and Staff Sergeant John Lackeos and Airman First Class John Dwyer, pararescuemen. Maintenance support for this mission was provided by Staff Sergeants Carl Meador and Gary Knight, Sergeant Steve Lyonnais and Airman John Cunningham of Det. 14. ' Supporting the 67th ARRSq were Staff Sergeant Walter Malcolm, Sergeant John Manuel Jr. and Airman Basic David Dwinnel. Traditional Navy E-1 - E-4 slated to sport bell bottoms Chief of Naval Operations Admiral James L. Holloway III announced last week the Navy's decision to return to the traditional bell bottom style uni- form for sailors in paygrades E-1 through E-4. Personnel in this group were chosen because, in an official Navy poll con- ducted last year, they expressed the greatest desire as a group to return to the bell bottom uniform. During Phase One of the return to bell bottoms, 20,000 fleet unit person- Modem design: WASHINGTON. D.C. (NES) Attention, women! The Chief of Naval Operations recently approved certain design changes and additions to your uniforms that will include open-neck shirts and a jumpsuit coverall. The changeover will take place grad- ually over the next two to three years to permit reduction of old uniform stocks and to allow time for the uni- forms now in use to wear out. The new uniforms include summer white to replace existing service dress light blue, an updated summer blue, winter working blue and a jumpsuit style cover- all. Summer white will be the most strik? ing change seen and includes an open- neck, white shirt with short sleeves and pockets, which may be worn with either white skirt or slacks. Summer blue will include the open-neck, short sleeved white shirt with either a Navy blue skirt or slacks. The summer blue uniform for women is similar to the Navy enlisted mens' existing summer blue. The winter blue uniform will feature Firefighter's reactions . •are an F-4C Phantom ¦ In ceremonies held July 28 at the Keflavik Airport Fire Station, Colonel Leon W. Babcock_ Jr., Commander Air Forces Iceland, presented the Aerospace Defense Command's Certificate of Recog- nition to Firefighter Thorhallur Gudmun- dsson. Firefighter Thorhallur Gudmundsson was praised for his action surrounding a tire failure and subsequent emergency on an F-4C Phantom. The aircraft was on takeoff roll when the tread separated from one or tne aircraft's tires, tne pilot was unaware of the failure because the aircraft lifted off the ground just nel will be issued and will wear bell bottoms to evaluate the uniform for durability and ease of maintenance of new fabrics. Fleet commanders-in-chief will se- lect specific Navy units to participate in the evaluation. Both blue and white versions of the classic dress and undress Navy uniform with jumper and bell bottom styling will be evaluated. Fabrics to be evaluated include a (continued on page 3) Women change uniform jumpsuit highlights style a long-sleeved, blue shirt with pockets worn with tie and ribbons. Without tie and ribbons the uniform becomes winter working blue. Either skirt or slacks may be worn with both winter uniforms. All the new uniforms have a web belt and a modified A-line skirt with a back zipper and back slit for ease of walking Among the new features are soft shoulder boards for officers' white shirts and the addition of slacks as; an optional item for most uniforms. The only uniforms unaffected by the change are officer and enlisted service dress blues and the officers' service dress whites. Now that the designs have been approved, the next step will be to select a suitable fabric for the uni- forms. Futher details will be announ- ced by the Bureau of Naval Personnel in the near future. The last major uniform style change for women was in 1943. Only minor changes and additions have occurred since that time, the latest in 1975 when the enlisted service dress blue uniform was changed to the same darker hue worn by officers. (continued on page 3) Careful watch as the failure occurred. Firefighter Gudmundsson observed the tread separation from the Immediate Crash. Response Location near the runway. He immediately notified traffic controllers and Fire Department personnel. Emergency procedures were then placed in motion by Air Force and Icelandic personnel. A planned emergency recovery allowed the aircraft to land safely. " Fire Chief Sveinn Eiriksson also praised Firefighter Gudmundsson's ac- tions that prevented the loss of a valuable aircraft and the possible loss of two crewmembers.

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The White Falcon

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