The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 04.11.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 04.11.1977, Blaðsíða 1
Navy Weather Detachme in Keflavik-just turn it displays current conditions to AFRTS Channel 2 Have you flipped your TV channel sel- ector to Channel 2 on AFTV lately? -y? If you have, that stuff on there pro- bably looks pretty confusing. But, now you can set that new barometer and com;- pare your window thermometer with the one at the Navy Weather Detachment at the airport because Channel 2 displays current base weather. Although the screen may look complicated, it's really a fairly simple code, describing in de- tail the weather at the NATO base . And it's updated every hour on the hour. The weather is coded several different ways, but the easiest one to read is the part right after the word "AVIATION". In order, cloud height and amount of cloud cover, prevailing visibility and any weather restrictions to visibility, sea level pressure, air temperature, dew point temperature, wind direction and speed, aircraft altimeter setting (you can set your home barometer to this value) and remarks are covered in a few lines after the word "AVIATION". Here is a typical sequence: . AVIATION 15 SCT 30 OVC 3SW- 981/- 32/30/3511/897 The amount of cloud cover is reported in symbols such as SCT which means scattered clouds or partly cloudy, BKN meaning broken clouds or mostly cloudy, OVC meaning overcast or cloudy and occasionally CLR or clear skies. The cloud bases are reported in hundreds of feet. For example, eight means 800 feet and 25 means 2500 feet. So, the first part of the example should read: Scattered clouds at 1,500 feet and over- cast clouds at 3,000 feet. Occasion- ally, the height will be prefixed by a letter which means the height is M- Measured or E=Estimated. An "X" means the sky is obscured, by snow, for instance. Prevailing visibility is reported next in miles, with the weather re- striction to visibility (if any) follow- ing "L" and "R" and "RW" mean drizzle, rain, or rain showers while "S", "SW" or "SP" mean some type of snow. "F" stands for fog. In the example above, the vis- ibility is three miles on the average, restricted by light snow showers. Sea level pressure is next. That value is reported in millibars and the first digit is omitted. Sea level pressure at Keflavik ranges between 940 and 1025 millibars. The pressure in the example is 998.1 mb (millibars). Confused? Well, it takes a little practice, but soon you'll get the hang of it and amaze your stateside friends. The next group of numbers are the air temperature of 32 degrees Fahrenheit and a dew point of 30 degree Fahrenheit. If the two numbers are very far apart, watch for static electricity because the atmo- sphere is dry. If the air temperature is dry. If the air temperature is below 39 degrees Fahrenheit, watch for icy roads an3 sidewalks. The next four digits are wind direc- tion and speed; 3511 translates to a wind from 350 degrees true ^northerly) at a speed of 11 knots. North is 360 degrees, east is 090, south 180, and west 270 degrees, just like on a compass. Finally, the next group of numbers tell the aircraft altimeter setting. That value is always around 28, 29 or 30 inches of mercury and the first digit is omitted. So, 897 means 28.97 inches. Set that number on your home barometer. The people at the Naval Weather Service Environmental Detachment are there to answer your questions. They offer free guided tours through the detachment on the second floor of Bldg. 810 at the Navy Air Terminal. Call 7829 first for tours or for questions about weather information on Channel 2. WfuteJ^Faleon Volume 33 Number 44 Beauty Shop's ribbon cutting ceremony Keflavik, Iceland November 4, 1977 New hairstyles from Paris The Beauty Shop held its ribbon cut- ting ceremony Oct. 28 at 10:30 a.m. in the new location within the Viking Build- ing. Captain Jack T. Weir, Commander Naval Forces.Iceland/Commanding Officer Naval Station Keflavik, along with Lieutenant Robert A. Brown, Navy Exchange Officer, Chief J. D. Phillips, Mr. James C. Grimsley, Merchandising Manager for the Navy Exchange, Ms. Dale Rife, manager of the NEX Beauty Shop and the operators, Karen, Dianne and Edda attended the ceremony. Mrs. Cuthriell and Mrs. Wolinski were the first customers to share In the ceremony and receive a piece of Good Luck cake. Karen has gotten back from Paris with some new women hairstyles. And the hours of operation are Monday by appointment only, Tuesday from 1 to 6 p.m., Wednesday and Friday from 9 to 6 p.m., Thursday from noon to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 9 to 1 p.m. The Beauty Shop also would like to inform the men that they too can receive the latest hairstyles. The telephone for appointments is 6211. 'White Halloween' on base As you may have already noticed, last Monday (Halloween) everyone on the NATO base was tricked, or treated—depending upon your poiit of view, with the sur- prise snow fall. The early snow, which may be just a preview of things to come, caught many people unaware. The biggest problem was that many people were caught without snow tires which made driving under the icy conditions even more NavSta Fire Dept. receives $500 In the recent Learn Not to Burn com- petition, sponsored by the National Fire Protection Association, the Naval Sta- tion Fire Department shared the highest award of $500. The award was announced Oct. 3 for the government and military division as well for the Facilities Engineers, Fire Prevention and Protection Division, Ft. George S. Meade, MD. According to Charles S. Morgan, NFPA president, the NavSta Fire Department is eligible for the 1977 Grand Award, of $2,000 in early 1978 plus a free trip to Anaheim, CA for the associa- tion's annual meeting in May. This phase of the NFPA competition included the U. S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps in addition to Navy installations. Government agencies in the United States and Canada also par- ticipated. NFPA offers a total of $13,000 an- nually in competition awards. Winners are expected "to increase their ex- pertise and education or to benefit their fire prevention projects and programs." There are competition phases for the municipal division twice a year; for the industry, health care and educational institutions division twice a year; and, for the government and military division once annually. hazardous. Icelandic law requires all vehicles to be equipped with one of the following combinations of snow tires: * Studded tires on all four wheels. * Non-studded tires on all four wheels. * Studded or nonstudded snow tires on the front wheels with chains on the rear wheels. If you don't have one of these com- binations on you vehicle it would be in your own interest to have it done as soon as possible. It can get mighty cold walking to work during a snow storm. TRAFFIC CONDITIONS With the oncoming., winter weather NATO base residents will be hearing more and more announcements concerning traf- fic conditions Alpha limited, Bravo, and Charlie. An explanation of these con- ditions follows: *ALPHA LIMITED—Traffic proceeds as required by existing conditions, but a speed limit of 20 m.p.h. is imposed throughout the base. *BRAV0—Movement of emergency and essential traffic is permitted. Essen- tial traffic is defined as official vehicles, service vehicles, buses and private vehicular traffic necessary to proceed to and from work, jWhen this condition is in effect, snow tires or chains are required. *CHARLIE—Only emergency vehicles are allowed to move and they must move at a reduced rate of speed. Emergency vehicles include ambulances, fire de- partment vehicles, command and duty of- ficer vehicles, private vehicles on re- call and snow removal equipment. One final nui_e on winter driving, the snow removal equipment operating on the NATO base can be identified by the flashing blue light on top. All vehicles are required to yield to snow removal equipment. The snow removal equipment is very large and often cannot maneuver around your car like smaller vehicles can. Marines to celebrate 202nd birthday Nov. 10 The Marines stationed at Keflavik will be celebrating the Corps 202nd birthday with two days of special events. ' Thursday, the local Marines begin the day with memorial services at the base chapel at 10 a.m. which will be followed by a picture taking session at 11 a.m. After lunch there will be sports com- petitions from 1-3 p.m. Sporting events leading the list will be volley- ball, racquetball and basketball. A Marine Corps ball at the Officers' Club will highlight the celebration. The ball will begin.at 6:45 p.m. with dinner at 7:15. A special ceremony will be held at 8:15. The guest of honor will be Captain Jack T. Weir, Naval Station Commanding Officer. Dancing will begin at 9 p.m. On Nov. 11, the Marines will cele- brate with physical training and run- ning in the morning and organized sports in the afternoon. RECEIVING A FIRM WELCOME, Vice Chief of Naval Opera- tions Admiral R. L. J. Long is greeted by Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Commander Iceland Defense Force, and Captain Jack T. Weir, Com- mander Naval Forces Iceland/ Commanding Officer Naval Station Keflavik. Admiral Long made a stopover and familiarization tour of the NATO base last week when he visited Hangar 831 for an Operation Command Center briefing. (photo by AN John Pappas)

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