The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 18.03.1961, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 18.03.1961, Blaðsíða 1
Our 'missidn' Jfs TD PRDDUCE Service news /^ND WE INTEND ^ULL CDVERAGE J?N EACH ISSUE Volume XI, Number 11 Headquarters, Air Forces Iceland, Keflavik Airport, Iceland—A MATS Unit Saturday, March 18, 1961 HeU49* If you plan to go to Paris on one of the 1-9 flights, keep this in mind; Paris will be jam-packed during the last of May and the first week of June, with the In- ternational Air Salon opening May 26 and closing June 4. The French capital also will be crowded with the usual hordes of tourists. A vacant room will be as hard to find as a glass of water at a Paris restaurant. US- AF members planning official or unofficial trips to Paris are ask- ed to restrict unnecessary travel to Paris during the period. * * # This should interst many of you. All G. I. Insurance dividend refund checks will be in the mail by Mar. 19. Making the report, Administra- tor of Veterans Affairs John S. Gleason Jr. said that by the mid March deadline more than 5,000- 000 policy holders will have re- ceived insurance dividend refunds amounting to about 258.5 million dollars. Normally the refunds are spread throughout the year, Mr. Gleason said, but payments are being accelerated by order of the President as a stimulus to the national economy. * # * Huge MATS Globemasters will airdrop about 6,000 paratroops of the 101st Airborne Division over Ft. Campbell, Ky., during March. Crews and aircraft from the 63d Troop Carrier Wing, Don- aldson AFB, S. C, and 62d Troop Carrier Wing, McChord AFB, Wash., will airdrop 3,800 para- troops from March 6-10, the most intensive period of the exercise. Approximately 1,100 flying hours are expended each month by MATS in support of Army training. During March, in addi- tion to airlifting the 101st, MATS will provide C-133 Cargomasters and C-124 Globemasters for static loading and unloading training for Army men at Ft. Bragg, N. C; Ft. Meade, Md.; Ft. Carson, Colo.; and Langley AFB, Va. * * * The USS Idaho Association in Norfolk, Va., is seeking contacts with all former officers and men who served on the battleship be- tween 1919-1947. The association is compiling a new roster of all current names and addresses. Annual reunions are held in Norfolk, and the fourth will be held July 21-23, 1961. Even though individuals do not attend the reunion, the associa- tion requests they send in their names and address to the USS Idaho Assn., P. O. Box 8048, Nor- folk 3, Va. ENLISTED MEN HONORED SN John S. Dulaney, center, VP-10, Det. 13, and A1C Douglas D. Carlile, Transportation Sq., were named Airman and Sailor of the Month for February at Keflavik. Here the two men are congratulated by Col. Benjamin G. Willis, IDF Commander. on board and 25 minutes later they were landing at Reykjavik where an ambulance was stand- ing by to rush the child to a hospital. Keflavik Helicopter Crew Completes Mercy Mission For Icelandic Child An Air Force helicopter crew flew a mercy mission last Sunday to evacuate a seriously ill, three-year-old boy from Borgarnes to a hospital in Reykjavik. The mission started when Mrs. Crainard,^" mother of the child and the widow of an American serviceman, cal- led Base Operations at Keflavik. Staff Sgt. J. P. Cieslewicz was on duty when the call came from Mrs. Crainard who explained that her child was seriously ill and that the local physician had re- commended immediate evacuation to a hospital. Cieslewicz alerted the Rescue Control Center and it made im- mediate arrangements to pick up Mrs. Crainard and her child at the dbck in Borgarnes. Within an hour after the initial call, Capt. Ronald E. Davison and Lt. Charles Trapp, pilots of the helicopter and A1C E. L. Wooters, a medical technician, were land- ing at Borgarnes. Mrs. Crainard and her son were quickly loaded Airman To Cadet The Office of Information this week distributed a pamp- hlet titled "Airman to Cadet," to commanders of each squad- ron. This pamphlet outlines the requirements necessary to ap- ply for admission to the Aca- demy, and the process to take. It follows an airman through all the procedures of becoming a Cadet. There is a related feature on Page Two of this week's White Falcon. Airmen who are interested in applying for admission to the Academy should see their com- mander. Overseas Expenditure Reduction Program To Go In Action Here America's Overseas Expenditure Reduction Program, introduced recently by President Kennedy, went into action here this week as IDF officials released a notice outlining the local project. The memorandum explains the means for accomplishing the ob- jective of the Department of De- fense to reduce overseas spending by individuals and effect a sav- ings of from $75 to $110 million in the outflow of U.S. gold dur- ing the remainder of 1961. Defense Department has out- lined two main points of action to reduce the outflow. The first is from military and civilian em- ployes overseas to reduce the amount of goods they purchase from foreign sources, and second, a stepped-up campaign to encour- age all members to purchase more U.S. Savings Bonds. Both programs will be accom- plished primarily through volun- tary action on the part of the individual. Iceland Defense Force officials pointed out that an intensive edu- cation program will be instituted to show the position of the United States in the International Bal- ance of Payments, and action the individual may make to contri- Airman Proficiency Testing Undergoes Important Change A big step toward reappraising Airman Proficiency Testing, was taken this week. Two important changes were announced that promise to allow greater flexibility for higher skill1®" in qualifying levels. The first change was delegation by USAF to major air command- ers of the authority to set the criteria for qualification on the APT at the 5 and 7 level. The second change was altering the present standard scores to an easier-to-understand percentile system with rankings made on an AF-wide basis. Previously, USAF set both the criteria and the qualifying stand- ard scores, outlined in AFM 35-8, paragraph 88, as 90 and above for five level APT and 100 and above for seven level APT. The two changes go hand-in- hand, USAF officials said. First they allow the commander to set qualifying scores and second give him a meaningful scale on which to base his decisions. "Existing scoring procedures and the established mandatory qualifying APT scores, which are prerequisite to skill upgrade ac- tions, seem to create insurmount- able problems within certain car- eer fields in some commands," said the USAF message that an- nounced the changes. This action could translate into better APT qualifying opportuni- ties in certain critical skill areas. But officials cautioned that the two announced changes in testing procedures will not herald a spree (See Test Change Page 3.) bute to a solution to the problem. Commanders are to receive in- formation and educational mater- ial to present their troops as soon as it is available, however, each commander has been called upon to devise his own program until the material arrives. The aim of the conservation program is for each military and Foreign automobiles purchas- ed after March 6, 1961, will not be shipped at the expense of the government. In a letter published by the Reykjavik Army Port, there are three requirements servicemen must meet in order to ship a foreign made car back to the U.S. at government expense. They are, (1) must possess a certified true copy of bill of sale, (2) Certified true copy of approved request to pur- chase a foreign made motor vehicle in compliance with Para. 6, Hq IDF Instructions, 4050.1A, dated Aug. 25, 1959, and (3) Certificate (for offi- cers) or sworn affidavit (for enlisted personnel) listing a description of the vehicle to include make, year, body style, color, motor number and lic- ense number, plus the date of order or date of purchase and the name and address of the dealer from whom the vehicle was purchased. civilian individual and dependent to limit his expenditures for for- eign goods to items which: (1) Are purchased in an ex- change outlet or other approved (See Expenditure Page S.) Greater Variety Of Programs Slated For Keflavik Viewers Televiewing at Keflavik Air- port is slated for an even greater variety of top programming ac- cording to recent reports received from Armed Forces Television Service at Los Angeles. This announcement follows on the heels of a major shuffle in programming designed to give local viewers a better daily bal- ance of television shows and changed some programs to view- ing hours similar to those state- side. New programs announced by the Los Angeles department in- clude drama, sports, and informa- tional shows which will be phas- ed into Keflavik telecasts on a regular basis within the next six weeks. This week the first of several new special shows made an ap- pearance on Channel 8 and these type programs are expected to be received more frequently in the future. This category include CALIFORNIA RODEO which will be seen today at 4:30 p.m. and the MISS AMERICA PAR- ADE which was . telecast last evening at 5:30 and makes a final appearance in the coming week. (See Greater Variety Page 3.) U.S. AIR FORCE — AEROSPACE POWER FOR PEACE

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