The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 27.05.1961, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 27.05.1961, Blaðsíða 2
WHITE FALCON Saturday, May 27, 1961 Future Offers Choices (This is the final in a series of articles based upon testimony before Congress by the Secretary and Chief of Staff of the Air Force, covering Air Force policy. Editor.) One of General White's last major points concerned future strategy, future choice. 1 "There are a number of strategic choices open to us — and to an enemy — and these will increase as the aerospace weapon inventories of both sides grow," he said. "These weapons will in- clude advanced aircraft, ground, sea and air-launched missiles and space weapons. As a result, we cannot afford to base our force structure on the premise that any one particular strategy will be followed. "In this light, I am deeply concerned with the need to main- tain a proper mix of manned and unmanned weapon systems in our future aerospace forces . "There is no question, for example, that this country's defense posture will be greatly improved by the phase-in of effective and reliable intercontinental ballistic missiles. They are exceptional weapons. "Nevertheless, they cannot perform all essential combat tasks. We will have to rely upon manned weapon systems to perform vital war functions which require on-the-spot, trained human judgement." And General White concluded: "In any future war, there is the almost certain probability that events will not unfold exactly as planned. Thus, there will be a tremendous premium on systems which can look, and find, and report, and attack, and return, and attack again. We will always need systems which can search out and destroy mobile targets, as well as fixed or rapidly developing targets whose positions are uncertain or unknown until observed. We will also need a post-strike reconnaissance capability to assess the results of our attacks and to show the way to the most effective employment of succeeding strikes." • * • A Time For Pride Memorial Day every year has been a poignant experience for Americans of all races and creeds. It has added meaning for us this year, perhaps, because it was born of the war that began 100 years ago and is now being commemorated by Centennial events. But May 30 has long since come to be a day of tribute to all of our war dead, when their graves are green with spring and bright with flowers. In Arlington National Cemetery the bugler sounds Taps and it is the pure distillation of the nation's feeling — grati- tude to these men who died for what they believed in. Is this to say that each and every one of them gave his life in a spirit of burning affirmation? Not at all. Most of them were ordinary men and a good many would not have been able to put their beliefs into words. Quite a few were foreign-born; they didn't die for their native land. But they did share with Americans by birth the feeling that America was a place where a man could be 10 feet tall and walk upright. This feeling is latent in all of us. It goes so deep, it is so basic to our being, that very few of us can attempt to define it without embarrassment. The men we honor on Memorial Day did not go into battle to die; they were not dedicated martyrs burning with a Cru- sader's passion. They did know, however, that men get killed in battles, and each of them gave plenty of thought to his own chances of coming out alive. In other words, these men were afraid. But they fought for their country anyhow. They wanted to live. They didn't. But the possibility of dying did not make them swerve from duty, so they were, perhaps, impelled by some spirit of devotion they only dimly sensed. We all have that spirit; we can be proud they had it. For, if they hadn't, would we be its inheritors? (AFPS) • • • Air Force Assigned Research, development and operation of all military recon- naissance satellite systems has been assigned to the Air Force by Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara. DOD Directive 5160.34 spelled out further that the Air Force, in the field of non-satellite mapping and geodetic systems, will be responsible for "research, development and operation of all cartographic, photographic, and geodetic systems (excluding data processing, other than field computations) requiring the service of high performance aircraft in accordance with the requirements and schedule provided by the Department of the Army." In a nutshell, USAF has a space role to develop and operate means of getting reconnaissance data. Once obtained by the Air Force, it's then the Army's job to process this into actual charts and maps. Similiarly, the U. S. Navy has been assigned the research, development, and operational mission of gathering data for survey of ocean areas. The Navy will then turn over this information to the Army for map-making. THE WHITE FALCON Col. Benjamin G. Willis, USAF Commander, Air Forces Iceland The WHITE FALCON in an official Class II Armed Forces newspaper published weekly at Ke/lavtk Airport, Iceland by Air forties Iceland of the Military Air Transport Service tor all contingents stationed at Keflavlk Airport. The WHITS FALCON receives AFPB and AFN8 materials. Views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Department of Defense. Information Officer..................Capt Warren J. Papin, USAF Editor .............................. TSgt Wylie Mason, USAF tufoldirprcntnnlSl* h.f. e THE j CALLS MATS units set the lowest AWOL rate in the command's history during the first quarter of calendar year 1961 with less than one man on AWOL lists for each 2,000 assigned. According to Security and Law Enforcement officials at MATS headquarters, MATS men during February established a single monthly low AWOL rate of .36 per 1,000 men assigned. The pre- vious low mark for a single month was set last August when MATS recorded a .46 AWOL rate per 1,000 men. Early in 1958, MATS had five men AWOL for every 2,000 men and this prompted officials to set a MATS goal of 1.50 per thous- and. This was reached in Nov- ember that year and by 1960 a new mark was set which was just half of the 1958 goal. The Security and Law Enforce- ment officials said the steady downward trend is attributed to the cooperation of commanders and supervisors through concen- trated study, and an effort en- abling potential AWOL to be identified and preventive measur- es taken. When MATS became a major command in 1948, the command had 29.1 man days lost per 1,000 men, while this past March, MATS showed 3.9 man days lost per 1,000 men through AWOLs. MATS officials have stressed the vigorous pursuit of low AW- OL goals to enhance the stand- ards of performance and reliabil- ity within MATS and ensure ful- fillment of all missions at lower costs and higher production. * * * Scientists have measured ener- gy from Venus at the very short wave length of 4.3 millimeters. They believe that this is the first time such measurements have been made. Their findings may help re- solve the question of the surface temperature of the planet and might influence plans for future space probes to Venus, estimated previously to be 600 degrees (F) hot. * * *, The Military Air Transport Service recently awarded contracts totaling more than $4.8 million to 11 civilian airlines. The contracts cover overseas transportation of military passengers and cargo during March, April, May and June. MATS buys commercial airlift for all branches of the armed forces as agent for the Secretary of the Air Force. * * * Kansas' first Atlas ICBM was placed in its launch complex Apr. 12 for checkout at Forbes AFB. It is assigned to Forbes' 548th Strategic Missile Squadron. *4lR FO*C Senators Are Briefed Top Air Force planners appeared before the Senate Armed Services Committee to give full details about the $6,079,000,000 needed in fiscal year 1962 for aircraft and missile procurement. USAF officials were specifically concerned with over $3.2 billion earmarked by a House of Representatives bill (H.R. 6151) for airraft and nearly $2.7 billion for missiles. Congressmen looked at a large chunk of the Defense De- partment budget for 1962—about $12 billion—as they examined the appropriation authorization for missiles, aircraft and naval ves- sels submitted by the Air Force, Army and Navy. While Congress has closely examined the Armed Forces "hard- ware" budgetary items in the past, this represents the first time that Congress has taken up aircraft, missile and naval procurement for the Armed Forces as a whole. Congress stipulated in Public Law 86-149, Section 412 (b), that after Dec. 30, 1960 such pro- curement be considered in its entirety to reduce the cost of defense and be of assistance to the Committees on Appropriations in their consideration of the Defense budget. Therefore, the 412-b hearings, as they are popularly known in Washington governmental circles, reflect top-side military thinking on trends in various hardware. And the Air Force generals giving concentrated "hardware" testimony for the first time followed this approach. * * * Maj. Gen. Prescott M. Spicer, director of programs, Hq. USAF, gave a summary of trends: "There is a decrease in combat units during the program period; however, the capability of the program- med units is increasing in modernization of the forces continued." "In the strategic manned forces, although modernized with B-52s and B-58s, there is a continuing decrease in the number of manned wings and squadrons while missile wings and squadrons continue to increase as the Atlas, Titan, and Minuteman become operational," General Spicer continued. "The air defense aircraft and missile squadrons are at a fairly well stabilized level. A Missile Defense Alarm System (Midas) is programmed to come into the force. The tactical force decreases as the force is modernized." Lt. Gen. Mark E. Bradley, Jr., deputy chief of staff, materiel, broke down the Air Force requests for FY 62 funds needed in the aircraft and missile procurement programs. On $670 million for aircraft modification he said, "the rapid technological changes and corresponding increase in enemy capabil- ity make it mandatory that our strike, defensive and support forces be constantly upgraded to cope with the changing threat. "This program provides our forces with the necessary improve- ments to maintain them in the required technical and operational configuration to meet such threats." General Bradley also briefed Senators on $82 million requested for items of common procurement, $46.7 million for component im- provements, $875 million for modernizatin and upkeep of industrial facilities, and $26 million for other items such as aircraft tip tanks. "With regard to the missile procurement program our request totals $2.8 billion dollars, he said. "The direct support programs provide the same type of support programs for missiles as pre- viously explained for aircraft; that is, spares and spare parts for operational missiles; common ground support equipment for in- service missiles; modification; component improvement; and in- dustrial facilities activities." * # * Maj. Gen. John K. Hester, deputy director of operations, Hq. USAF, told senators about the actual hardware. Talking of air refueling, he said that "increasingly effective enemy defenses require more flexible tactics. Some of these involve low altitude penetrations, while others involve end runs around enemy defenses, or a combination of both. Adequate tanker support is essential to these tactics... .The KC-135 jet tanker is the present answer to the inflight refueling problem." On F-105s, he said: "This airplane is needed to replace obsolete tactical fighters and bombers which do not have the performance or fire power essential for combat in the mid-1960s. Furthermore, our older fighters have a very limited ability to deliver weapons under adverse weather conditions. Prompt modernization of the tactical fighter forces is essential." * * * He discussed T-38, T-39, T-40 trainers and air-to-air infrared and radar homing missiles, and then took up the B-70 program. "The B-70 improvements in performance are not measured in percentages but by factors, almost four times in cruise speed, two times in altitude, ground reaction time equal to or better than our present fighter aircraft. "This kind of performance, plus the ability to carry a large load of different sizes and types of nuclear munitions, will give this weapon system the versatility so necessary to do the job which we cannot do with missiles alone," he declared. * * * "The revised budget provides $218 million for the continued development of this item," General Hester continued. "The current program will lead to a demonstration of the technical feasibility of a B-70 type aircraft, and the design and demonstration of a bombing system. Discussions are now going on between the contractor and the Air Force regarding the number of prototypes to be produced." General Hester also discussed modernization of the Military Air Transport Service fleet with C-130E cargo and troop carriers and the new C-141 jet-fan plane just off the drawing boards.

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The White Falcon

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