The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 05.03.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 05.03.1965, Blaðsíða 1
THE WHITE WflllLcBCDirD.. U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 9 Friday, March 5, 1965 L. Cpl. Cook Save® Fallen Marine Buddy L. Cpl. Douglas R. Cook, was possibly the primary factor in saving the life of fellow-marine, L. Cpl. William L. Ris- boskin, Feb. 22, at the Hvalfurdur Security Camp located 95 miles northeast of the Naval Station. Lance Corporals Cook and Risboskin went out hiking with two other marines. While climbing Mt. Thyrill, which lies east of the security camp,^- Cook Risboskin was hit by a dislodged rock. The rock caused him to lose his balance and fall approximately 15 feet. He sustained a very se- vere compound fracture of his left leg when it became wedged in a crevice of a rock. The three oth- er marines im- mediately went to his rescue. Cook saw the bleeding and ap- plied a tourniquet to stem the flow. Cook, along with PFC Malcolm L. Smith and Pvt. John W. Kenne- dy, III, carried Risboskin to higher ground and better comfort, then used their own jackets and shirts to keep Risboskin warm. Seeing the need for trained medical assistance, Cook ran one- and-a-half miles to the nearest phone. He called for "Doc" Ro- bert V. Cory, HM3, the corpsman for the security camp. He had also dispatched Private Kennedy in another direction to seek what- ever help he could get. Kennedy met a party of hikers consisting of Lt John Sollman. Lt. George H. Bryan, Sgt. Lloyd R. Banta and two other marines. He told them of the accident. Lieutenant Sollman, of the Naval Station Hospital, and Banta went with Kennedy back up the moun- tain to offer whatever aid they could. Upon learning of the accident, Lt. Bryan, Officer-in-Charge of the Security Camp, decended the mountain by the most direct route in order to summon a heli- copter and medical supplies. With- in minutes of Bryan's call, a party of marines set out from the secu- rity camp with medical supplies, blankets, and a stretcher. Cook met the party and rushed back up the mountain with de- merol for Sollman to give Risbos- kin to ease the pain. The rescue party with Corps- man Cory made the trip across the marsh and the climb to the ledge where Risboskin lay, in record time, considering the steep ascent and the burden they were carrying. The helicopter ""-"S arrived just as f|^ the marines were ready to place Risboskin in the | stretcher. Dr. ||k Robert L. Mullin, i Senior , Medical Officer of the Naval Station Hospital, who had accompanied the helo, with Hellard Corpsmen Donald Hellard, HN, and Gerald A. Sedric, HM3, de- cended to the ledge to examine the injury before Risboskin was moved. Movement of the patient from the ledge to the helo some 500 feet above required the efforts of ten marines and the local Ice- landic Policeman, Mr. Finnur Eyjolfsson. "This was quite a climb," said Mr. Sollman, "con- sidering the steep and rocky mountainside. Lt Clinton L. Tuttle, pilot of the helicopter, landed the patient on the lawn in front of the Station Hospital 45 minutes later. In re- sponse to a call by the hospital, five of Risboskin's fellow marines do- nated blood. These were (Privates Harold D. Vincion and James K. Anderson, PFC Francis E. Gan- giano, and Corporals Edward J. Roche, Jr., and Robert H. Kick- lighter. After some preliminary surgical repairs and splinting done by Dr. Mullin, Risboskin was on his way to the U.S. Naval Hospital, Beth- esda, Maryland on board a C-121 aircraft. "Lance Corporal Cook's quick thinking and positive action," said Lieutenant Sollman, "were re- sponsible for preventing the loss of large amounts of blood, and his handling of the situation is deserving of note. Noteworthy also were the coordinated efforts of the marines in bringing vital medical supplies up the mountain, as well as the efforts of Pilot Tuttle landing the helicopter in a very difficult place." ¦ . ¦ 'Stains' Mark Iceberg Floes A bow and arrow experiment will be launched on the North Atlantic iceberg menace by the Coast Guard's 1965 International Ice Patrol. The 51-year-old patrol had made enormous advances in tracking the icebergs, an official said, but the problem remains a serious one to shipping. The experiment involves firing a die-tipped arrow into an iceberg, leaving a stain eight to ten feet in diameter lasting about three days. This will help trace the ice- berg drift and provide mariners with more up-to-date drift chains. Greenland glaciers grind their way to the sea pushing ice moun- tains into the Labrador Current, which bears them into shipping lanes. Icebergs have been fire-bombed, hit with cannon fire and covered with lampblack to hasten their melting, but to no avail. (AFPS) WOMAN OF THE YEAR — Joan Crawford, actress, business exec- utive and humanitarian, has been selected to receive the first USO of New York City "Woman of the Year" award. Miss Crawford has been an active supporter of the USO since its inception in 1941 and is a director of the boards of the New York City service organi- zation. Hail & Bless Personnel who have arrived (Hail) and left (Bless) U.S. Na- val Station, Keflavik for duty as of Feb. 26: HAIL Wright, D. G., AGAA Conner, E. T., SA Laird, C. M., MM1 Braune, R., CMA2 Tracy, E., AECS Slayback, J., CS2 Richardson, C, SH2 Rigby, R. D., YN2 Vredeveld, T. L., CN Freeman, D. R., ATC McLaughlin, R. B., CSA Graves, J. E., BULCP Phillips, W., CP Hail, R. M., AN Crowder, J., CTSN Sisco, S., ACC Adams, F., CT2 Home, M. V., HM2 Devitt, J. J., CT1 Greer, C. E., SHCA Underwood, I. T., SA Wier, W. D., SN Smith, O. O., SN Baker, D. A., SA BLESS Matoon, D. L., AGCA Green, B. R., CS2 Hickson, R. C, TM2 Robeson, E. T., AE3 Beattie, R. L., AG1 Vogel, P. C, Cpl. LaCour, R. J., ETN2 O'Hare, T. J., AN Martin, R. L., RM2 Moberly, H. B., CM1 Gallagher, ., BULCN Souder, B. F., SN Parker, F. N., ABF1 Reynolds, L. A., Pvt. Skandamis, S. P., RM1 McGough, P. G., SN Jones, W. R., SKI Cote, G. H., CM1 Cox, R. B., DK3 Caldwell, J. R., CN Sillay, F. I., Jr., L. Cpl. Mobley, P. C, ET1 DOD Proposes More Pay. Housing Belief its Although Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara's FY66 "posture" statement dwells pri- marily on the military hardware and operational aspects required to maintain national security, a select portion deals with personnel compensation and benefits. Within the government-wide al- location of "allowances for con- tingencies," a provision is made for a number of items of proposed or possible legislation, including military and civilian pay adjust- ments, carrier flight deck hazar- dous duty pay, uniform career management and a cash awards program for members of the arm- ed forces. Delivering his statement to mem- bers of the House Armed Services Committee, Secretary McNamara explained the need for additional family housing. The secretary strongly urged the Congress to support the De- fense Department's FY66 request for 12,500 housing units. Two years ago DOD presented to Con- gress a program on the need for 62,100 units over a five-year per- riod. Noting that President Johnson "wants our uniformed citizens to be first class in every aspect," Secretary McNamara explained, "We feel that the provision of adequate family housing is one of the foundation stones in provid- ing first class treatment to our armed forces." The $743.3 million requested for family housing in the FY66 budget also includes provisons for con- struction of trailer park facilities and relocation of certain housing units; improvement of existing public quarters; planning, opera- tion and maintenance including cost of units leased, and payments for indebtedness and mortgage in- surance premiums. As for medical services, Sec- retary McNamara said a $48 mil- lion construction program is plan- ned for FY 66. This includes re- placement of about 800 bed-spaces and various clinics and construc- tion of various laboratory and other facilities. The secretary points out that in planning these facilities, provision has been made for space for de- pendents of active duty military personnel, except in a limited number of areas where it is felt adequate civilian facilities exist. Explaining that the problem of providing health care in military hospitals for retired personnel and dependents of both active duty and retired personnel is an old one, Secretary McNamara told the committee, "I hope by this time next year I will be able to re- commend some solution to this problem." The Defense Department's arm- ed forces information and educa- tion program will be continued in FY66 at a cost of about $9.3 mil- lion, the secretary said. He noted that this program provides world- wide radio, television and press services, together with a program designed to promote a broad un- derstanding among military per- sonnel of national goals and pur- poses. (AFPS) Commissary Reenlistment NO TIME TO PLAY—Lt David J. Chesley, Officer-In-Charge, Com- missary Store, administers the reenlistment oath to Dennis J. McNa- mara, SHI, in the commissary butcher shop. It seems fitting that the ceremony be held in a background and attire so familiar to Dennis. This 4-year hitch will put McNamara over the 20-year mark. (Photo by Weese, PHAN)

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