The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 28.05.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 28.05.1976, Blaðsíða 1
> White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 21 KeHavic. Iceland May 28, 1976 The Class of 76- Wve only just begun' COs can ID new strikers The Bureau of Naval Personnel is changing its rules so that Commanding Officers can assign Striker Identifica- tion to E-3's who have been working in a rating. They must meet all other E-4 exam eligibilities except for time in service and time In grade. Up to now, striker desigiation could be achieved only ty passing the E-4 exam for a particular rating and not being advanced, or by graduating from an "A" School. The new guidelines, spelled out in Bupers Note 1440 dated April 28th, allow a Commanding Officer to recognize sus- tained on-the-job performance in the rating. Commanding Officers may not assign striker identification, however, for ra- > tings which require completion of "A I School. PAO sponsors Bicentennial Contest In conjunction with the NATO Base Bicentennial celebration, the Naval Sta- tion Public Affairs Office will sponsor a literature contest. Winning entries will be published in the July 2 issue of the White Falcon. Topic for the contest is America. Writers are not limited to a particular period of American history, nor a speci- fic social, government or economic era. Winners will be named in two cate- gories for two age groups, and will re- ceive engraved trophies or ribbons. The contest will be divided into two age brackets: (1) ages 15 and below; and (2) ages 15 and above. Writing styles for the contest are essay and poetry. Entries must not ex- ceed 500 words, and should be carefully handwritten or typed, double spaced. The staff of AFRTS and the Naval Station public affairs office, military information specialists and their fam- ilies, are not eligible to participate. Deadline for entries is June 25. Entries should be delivered to AFRTS, Bldg. T-44, and marked "Bicentennial Literature Contest." The decision of the judges shall be final. The A. T. Mahan High School Class of 1976 received their diplomas Sunday afternoon in an impressive hour-long graduation ceremony at the Base Chapel. The eighteen seniors, dressed in royal blue gowns and caps with red, white and blue tassels, walked into the chapel to the traditional "Pomp and Circumstance" played by organist Joe Derrick. The Senior Thoughts, a series of philosophical ideas and words of wisdom. were read by Sherry Allen, Sheryl Row- land, Lisa Velez and Tekla Skowronski. Valedictorian Shannon Wood, express- ing hopeful feelings of the future, challenged the adult world to receive the Class of '76 and accept their new ideals saying, "We have only just be- gun." Margaret King, in her salutatory ad- dress, urged her classmates to think about what they had learned in the past 12 years and to always remember and ap- ?V tf* w\ ^**&: r s ..iiJfl^B predate the sacrifices and hard work given by their teachers. Mr. Doyle Martin, deputy chief of mission, American Embassy, delivered the commencement address and presented the graduates with their diplomas. Representatives from various base clubs and organizations were present to award scholarships to the most deserving graduates: Gary Ansell $1000, CPO Ad- visory Board and CPO Wives' Club; Shan- non Wood $400, Bob Bohannan $200, Wanda Smith $200, Fil-Am Association; Shannon Wood $150, Fleet Reserve Association; Jon Heinrich $100, Greg Freeburn $100, Gary Ansell. $100, Keflavik Officials' Association; Sheryl Rowland $200, Mid- night Sundowners; Bob Bohannan $200, NCO Wives' Club; Karen Bourque $500, Offi- cers' Wives' Club; Shannon Wood $1000, Karen Bourque $700, Parent-Teacher Or- ganization. Story and photos by J01 Jim Miller TEKLA SKOWRONSKI (left photo) leaves the graduation ceremony. Eighteen A. T. Mahan High School seniors received their diplomas Sunday in the Base Chapel. Tekla will begin studies at Springfield Technical Community College, Spring- field, Mass. majoring in cosmetology. AT LEFT, families and friends gather outside the chapel to congratulate the graduates. Memorial Day is a traditional time for Americans to remember with pride and appreciation the more than one million fellow citizens who have died in the de- fense of our country. As we pay tribute to our military dead, we must do more than applaud their legendary courage; we must rededicate ourselves to the heritage of freedom for which they gave their lives. By acting in a way that reflects credit on their patriotism, we can honor their memory and extend that heritage to future generations. On this Memorial Day our defenses are strong, and we are more determined than ever to keep them strong; not strong for the sake of war—but strong for the sake of peace. A grateful nation, rejoicing in two hundred years of freedom and independ- ence, we salute our armed forces—past and present—and acknowledge their in- s Jring contribution to our national se urity and way of life. Gerald R. Ford On Memorial Day 1976, America pays tribute to the members of our armed forces who have given their lives to secure our country's independence and freedom. We recall their valor and their cour- age, and we honor them for their total commitment to our nation. This time of reflection, however, should also be a time of resolve. The freedom for which more than one million Americans have sacrificed their lives in battle can endure only as long as we cherish and defend it. By main- taining unquestioned strength and dedi- cation in our national and international endeavors, America will preserve the freedom and peace which those whom we honor on Memorial Day valued more than life. The defense of freedom is a sacred trust bequeathed to all Americans, es- pecially Americans in uniform. As we pay homage to our defenders of the past, we also salute the vigilant men and women of today's armed forces who safeguard our freedom of the present and the future. Donald Rumsfeld Secretary of Defense Memorial Day-started from peoples' feelings There are several stories of the origin of Memorial Day. All are humane stories—of a people's desire to honor their war dead with ceremonies, flowers and processionals. One recounts how widows, mothers and children of the Confederate dead went out and decorated their graves with flowers; and that at many places, they also impartially placed flowers on unknown and unmarked graves of Union soldi- ers. As the news of this touching tribute spread throughout the North, it helped to reduce sectional bitterness. From sorrow common to the North and South came this beautiful custom of decorating the graves of our Armed Forces. In a more formal manner, 108 years ago, Decoration Day, or Memorial Day, as it is now called, was so designated by General John A. Logan, commander-in chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of Union veterans of the Civil War. However, Gen. Logan along did not create Memorial Day. No one person began it. The day grew out of the feelings of the people. The Nation needed the day to speak its grief after a war that had torn the country apart. In its way, Memorial Day helped reunite the United States. The exact date has undergone several changes, The first Memorial Day was observed on May 30, 1868. Today, it is a legal holiday observed by most states on the last Monday in May, which was made a Federal holiday by law in 1971. Several states have chosen other days for their observances. ¦n-i^:'^- ¦" : • .-.'.¦..¦•:•/.¦?£:¦;£•-'••"¦¦¦' A? r-P' ¦' •Vi'SvK

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The White Falcon

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