The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 22.10.1976, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 22.10.1976, Blaðsíða 1
White Falcon Volume XXXII Number 42 Keflavik, Iceland October 22. 197& NEWS BRIEFS A. T. Mahan 1st Quarter ends The first quarter of this school year will end Oct. 29, according to Burke Adams, principal-in-charge. Students in grades kindergarten through 12 will not attend school on Nov. 1 because teachers will be in- volved in professional activities. Parent-Teacher conferences for grades one through six will be held Nov. 2 through Nov. 5. Students will attend school mornings only, with the conferences scheduled for afternoon. Report cards will be given to parents at the conferences. Lunch will not be served at the elementary school. Kindergarten Parent-Teacher con- ferences also will be held Nov. 2-5. Kindergarten students will attend school as usual. High School students grades 7-12 will attend regular class . sessions during this period. High School re- report cards will be sent out Nov. 5. CFC success at Hofn ¦When the Overseas Combined Federal Campaign kicked off at the Hofn radar site, no one had any idea what novel- ties would arise from what usually is a hum-drum fund drive. The campaign got its greatest sup- port from a 24-hour radio-thon on AFRS Hofn that got the attention and pledges of the site's 120 men. As pledge support dwindled, a shot in the arm came from a number of not-to- be-named individuals who volunteered their services as money-runners to "streak for CFC." More pledges jam- med phone lines to see the H-3 streak league don their official uniforms of tennis shoes and baseball caps and streak from the site flagpole to the main gate and back. Altogether, the site contributed $2,148.96 which in- cludes a $10.46 donation from Rosie, the site mascot. The total contribution averages out to a $17.76 donation from each of the 121 residents at Hofn. Happy Bi- centennial, CFC. Veterans Day Veterans Day will be observed Mon- day. This holiday, formerly called Armistice Day, traditionally began on Nov. 11 when President Wilson pro- claimed this date as Armistice Day in 1919. Honoring the war dead and veterans of American wars, Veterans Day com- memorates the end of hostilities in World War I. Memorial ceremonies, held annually since 1921, pay tribute to America's war dead at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Ceme- tery in Virginia. Congress changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day in 1954. 57th 'WT team to depart Wed. The 57th Fighter Interceptor Squad- ron William Tell '76 team, led by Lieutenant Colonel Mike Foy, will de- part Keflavik Wednesday for Florida's Gulf Coast. The team's 10 F-4C Phantom pilots and weapons systems officers have prepared several weeks for the compe- tition. Flying five of the squadron's Phantoms, the team will make the 3,200-mile trip in eight hours. The aircraft will be refueled inflight by KC-135 Stratotankers. Captain William A. Weeks will lead the 42-man William Tell '76 mainten- ance team to Eglin AFB, Fla., depart- ing Keflavik at 3 a.m. Wednesday. At Eglin, the crew will make final preparations for the Nov. 4 competi- tion at Tyndall AFB, 70 miles away. The competition will include not only actual weapons firing against airborne'targets, but also an evalu- ation of weapons loading and aircraft controller teams.. William Tell '76 is designed to commemorate the Bicentennial and to evaluate America's strategic defense capability against airborne attack. Six bate enlist eds selected IDF honors Servicemembers of the Quarter An Air Force security specialist and a training record monitor, two Marine guards, a Navy radioman and a Navy mech- anic all gathered together Monday after- noon. What did they have in common? They all were the most recently selected Ser- vice Members of the Quarter. Each received a plaque in the shape of Iceland, a letter of commendation, and a priority three on the Naval Sta- tion Environmental and Morale flight to Europe. Rear Admiral Karl J. Bernstein, Com- mander Iceland Defense Force, presented the awards. • Sergeant Gary C. Jones, Air Force NCO of the Quarter, says: "If I had to choose a remote site...it would be Ice- land. It isn't as isolated as I first thought it would be." The native of Miami feels the weather is too cold here, "To me, anything below 60 degrees is cold." But with only a month left in Iceland, he won't have to worry about another winter here. The security specialist has been in the Air Force about three years and wants to become an officer. Senior Airman Kathrine E. Loyd, Air- man of the Quarter, has been stationed in Keflavik, with her husband—who is her supervisor—since February. Even though Airman Loyd puts in a full day's work which deals with training records for the 57th, she finds time to enjoy ceramics and bowling. She also is a member of the Air Forces Iceland Advis- ory Board. Corporal Gregory M. Mitchell, Marine NCO of the Quarter, comments about his 10 months of service here: "I enjoy the outdoors and go camping frequently. I also have participated in basketball and Softball competition." The native of Windsor Locks, Conn., was graduated from high school in 1973 and attended college one year before en- tering the Marine Corps. He now serves as Corporal of the Guard at the Marine Barracks. Although the Marine of the Quarter, Lance Corporal Donald C. Scott, has been stationed in Iceland only two months, much has happened to him. Not only has he been selected as Ser- viceman of the Quarter, he also was meritoriously promoted to his present rank just last week. The native of Low- er Burrell, Pa., is performing guard duties for the Marine Barracks. Radioman Second Class James R. Col- lins, Petty Officer of the Quarter, de- clares: "The two years I've been here have passed quickly because I have been involved in the Boy Scouts, Fleet Re- serve Association, Little League and the college program," The former Marine is a native of Jacksonville, Fla., and will soon be stationed at Little Creek, Va. About his job, Petty Officer Collins says: "It is a challenge to keep up with technical manuals and directives, and to train others. As the Air-to- Ground petty officer of the ASW Support Communications, I am responsible for the procedures used in the communications room." Construction Mechanic Kenny L. Saul, Sailor of the Quarter, says, "Duty here is what you make of it." The Greenville, Pa., native graduated from a technical school in June 1975, before joining the Navy. "Working with the people in the Pub- lic Works Body Shop is a lot of fun," he said. Since arriving in January, Construct- ionman Saul has traveled to Germany and backpacked in Iceland. He also partici- pated in the base wrestling tournament last spring. Photos by PH3 Rene Pearce Sgt. Gary C. Jones Air Force NCO of the Quarter I 1 Cpl. Gregory Mitchell Marine NCO of the Quarter RM2 James R. Col lins Petty Officer of the Quarter SRA Kathrine E. Loyd Airman of the Quarter CMCN Kenny L. Saul Sailor of the Quarter LCpl. Donald C. Scott Marine of the Quarter

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