The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 27.05.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 27.05.1977, Blaðsíða 1
White'Fabnn Volume XXXIII Number 21 Kellavik, Iceland May 27, 1977 VP-24 begins Kef lavik deployment by Ltjg G.M. Black Patrol Squadron TWENTY-FOUR assumed the duties of Patrol Squadron Keflavik Wednesday, and will remain in Iceland until relieved by Patrol Squadron SIX- TEEN in November. VP-24's last deployment was to Sigonella, Sicily, from January to June 1976. Previously, VP-24 spent two win- ter deployments in Keflavik. Since returning from Sigonella, the "Batmen" have been vigorously preparing for the Iceland deployment. The result of VP-24's intensive training programs has been the designa- tion of 11 of the 12 aircrews as "Char- lie One" (C-l). This readiness status indicates maximum proficiency in all phases of the P-3C "Orion" mission. The "Batmen" of VP-24 are indeed appreciate of the warm reception accord- ed them by Naval Station personnel, and look forward to an enjoyable and suc- cessful summer deployment. Heading Patrol Squadron TWENTY-FOUR is Commander Lynn H. Grafel. Born in McCook, NE, Cdr. Grafel at- tended Kansas State University, Manhat- tan, KS, graduated in 1959 with a bach- elor of science degree in agriculture education. Cdr. Lynn H. Grafel The commander was commissioned an en- sign in the Naval Reserve through the Naval Aviation Officer Candidate Program at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL in March 1960. VP-45 returns to by Ltjg Al Harms The Patrol Squadron FORTY-FIVE "Pelicans" have flown back to sunny Jacksonville, FL, ending not only a successful operational deployment but a warm relationship with Naval Station Keflavik. The Patrol Squadron TWENTY-FOUR "Batmen" relieved VP-45 yesterday. VP-45's deployment began during twintry days after Christmas, and has since worked in perfect harmony with the Naval Station. Commander S. F. Loftus, VP-45 com- manding officer, stated "We came to Keflavik with the goal of intergrating as closely as we could into station ac- tivities. We wanted to get involved with the Naval Station, and I believe that the primary reason that our de- ployment was an outstanding success was because we were able to work so closely with our station counterparts." Indeed, VP-45 became immediately in- volved with the station by launching a specially prepared P-3 on a medical e- vacuation flight of an infant to Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland. In addition to flying duties, VP-45 supported other base activities. The squadron provided tours and air- craft static displays for interested station groups and the community. Early in the deployment, VP-45 briefed the commandant and other visitors from the Norwegian Defense College. VP-45 flew a mail drop to Jan Mayen Island accompanied by Oli Tynes, a Reykjavik newspaper reporter. Oli Tynes helped to promote an accurate pic- ture of the job done by the deployed patrol squadron. Individual Pelicans also became in- volved with the station. Petty Officer Harold C. MacCollum volunteered his services to the Los Angeles Community College Overseas, as an aviation air frames and power plants instructor, a three credit hour course offered to both VP-45 and Air Force personnel. Also, Petty Officers Walt Misora and Wayne Vanassche spent many off duty hours rebuilding bicycles for distrib- tion to Icelandic institutions. Dis- carded bicycles and parts were collected by VP-45 wives in Jacksonville, brought to Iceland and repaired by Wayne and Walt. Wayne Vanassche said, "We hope, that by our efforts, the bicycles will bring much happiness." The Pelicans naturally got involved in station sports. They sponsored teams in basketball, racquetball, volleyball, wrestling and Softball. VP-45 was able to win the base basket- ball tournament and take second place in the base wrestling tourney. Upon being designated a naval avia- tor, he reported to Patrol Squadron FOUR, homeported at Naha, Okinawa where he served until August 1963. He then reported to Patrol Squadron THIRTY-ONE as an instructor and anti- submarine warfare flight training offi- cer until March 1966. His next assignment was as flag lieu- tenant and aide for Commander Patrol Wings U. S. Pacific Fleet until May 1968. While stationed with Patrol Squadron NINE at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, CA, he flew the P-38 aircraft, making several deployments on his tour there. In August 1970, Cdr. Grafel began studying at the Naval Command and Staff Course at the Naval War College, Newport, RI, where he graduated in June 1971. Additionally, he was graduated from George Washington University with a master of science in international af- fairs. His next tour was with the Staff, Commander Patrol Wing ELEVEN where he was antisubmarine warfare officer and then training officer until June 1975. After training at Patrol Squadron THIRTY, Cdr. Grafel reported as exe- cutive officer, Patrol Squadron TWENTY- FOUR in November 1975, and in December 1976 became commanding officer. Patrol Squadron TWENTY-FOUR was com- missioned April 10, 1943, at the Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, HI. The squadron was originally designa- ted Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED FOUR, but was redesignated Heavy Patrol Squad- ron FOUR in November 1946. In August 1948, it assumed its pre- sent name of Patrol Squadron TWENTY-FOUR. The squadron established an enviable record in the Pacific during World War II. It was credited with sinking 110 Japanese ships, damaging 152, destroying 32 enemy planes and "probably" destroy- ing 36 others during an eight-month deployment. Recognizing its raids at Guadalcanal, Munda and the Philippines, the squadron received two Presidential Unit Citations. Patrol Squadron TWENTY-FOUR is the only patrol squadron in the history of naval aviation to be awarded this highly coveted award twice. VP-24 has also received the Meritori- ous Unit Citation for special anti-sub- marine warfare projects, the Navy Unit Citation, the Captain Arnold J. Isbell Trophy and the Battle Efficiency Award. The squadron recently was bestowed the Commander Naval Air Atlantic Safety Citation and the Chief of Naval Opera- tions Maintenance Award. Elderly woman rescued by Det. 14 A seriously ill 77 year old woman, who was bleeding internally, was mede- vaced by Detachment 14 Air Force Rescue 716 last week from Hvallatur to Stykkis- holmur, Iceland. The HC-130 acted as the on the scene commander along with the HH-3E. HC-130 relayed information to the "Jolly Green Giant" (AFR 716) concerning route as well as obstacles and distance to the island. People oh the island prepared a field, and outlined it with orange fishing floats. The island, which is located about 40 miles from Reykjavik, is about 300 yards long and 100 yards wide. The immediate point was determined to be a farm house and barn plus two fields. Two rescue specialists were accompan- ied by the flight surgeon to the farm house where they examined the patient. The patient was offloaded subsequent- ly- Afterwards, the flight home was de- layed by a precautionary landing be- cause of the main gear box caution light. The flight then continued to Keflavik after the problem was fixed. AFR 716 air refueled with HC-130 (AFR 820), onloading 1,000 pounds of JP-4 fuel. The air refueling was conducted at 1,000 feet because of a low ceiling. The HH-3E crew included Major Ken Key, aircraft commander; First Lieuten- ant John Watts, copilot; and, Technical Sergeant Ken Jones, flight mechanic. The rescue team was comprised of Airman First Class Bert Eymberts and Sergeant Greg Frandsen, rescue special- ists; Major Charles Girard, flight surgeon accompanied them. 57th awards medals Three 57th Fighter Interceptor Squad- ron personnel received the Air Force Commendation Medal recently. In addi- tion, one Air Force captain was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. They are as follows respectively: Air Force Commendation medal, Captain James E. Slusar; Technical Sergeant Ronald C. Bramblett; and, Senior Airman Phillana E. Tuff. Captain David C. Ladd received the Meritorious Service Medal. WASHING THE CAR IS A FAMILY AFFAIR from the youngest to the oldest. Car Wash reflects pride in one's work "Workin' at the car wash" can be your seasonal song at the Recreation Depart- ment Car Wash. This facility can help you tidy up that flivver to take your wife or your girlfriend out. Located in the first green building directly behind the Public Works Depart- ment, the Car Wash is open 5 to 10 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. A wash costs only 50 cents while a wash and wax will run just a $1.50. The Car Wash, which is contained in- doors, offers hot and cold water, a vacuum cleaner plus a drain in the cen- ter of the complex for excess water runoff. For that unique individual touch, patrons may bring their own towels, soap and buckets. Now that you've got a clean break, you can take a shine to this wholesome facility. CHAPLAIN (Col.) Richard A. Trapp of the Aerospace Defense Command staff greets CW04 U. F. Hiller during a recent visit.

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The White Falcon

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