The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 06.01.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 06.01.1978, Blaðsíða 1
2,742 Liberty ships built between 1941, 1945 only one stands today - soon to be an historic object (Benicia, CA)-President Franklin Roosevelt called them "Ugly Ducklings" German submariners who torpedoed them ""called them "Kaiser's Creeping Cof- fins". But to the thousands of men who sailed on them they were Liberty ships, the backbone of America's mas- ive sea force that helped crush the zi and Japanese war machines in the '940s. In an incredible surge of national productivity, 2,742 Liberty ships were mass-produced between 1941 and 1945 in 18 American shipyards—the largest number of ships ever built from a sin- gle design. Now, more than 30 years later, only one authentic Liberty ship .remains—the "Jeremiah O'Brien". It rests at anchor 40 miles northeast of San Francisco in the Suisun Bay Mothball Fleet near Benicia, CA. There are some other ships around that started as Liberties, but they have since been modified for other purposes. The vast majority are long gone: Either cut up for scrap or deliberately sunk to create artificial ocean reefs to improve fishing. As the last "original" Liberty, the O'Brien, is starting to attract people, the regional director for the U.S. Mar- itime Administration, Thomas Patterson, says efforts are being made to have the O'Brien declared a historic object. That would be the first step toward turning it into a public museum. But Patterson, whose command in- cludes the Suisun Mothball Fleet, estimates it would cost about $300,000 to get the O'Brien cleaned up, painted, sealed and moored permanent- ly for display. And money for such projects is often hard to come by. Even by today's standards, the building of the Liberty ships re- presents a technological marvel. Like Henry Ford's Model "T", the Li- berties were classics of simplicity, low cost and utility. Across the country, hundreds of thou- sands of factory workers—both men and women—built the 30,000-plus components which were then rushed to east and west coast shipyards for speedy assembly. Many were built by the Henry J. Kaiser industrial empire which com- bined their slow 10-knot speed, and accounted for one of their nicknames— "Kaiser's Creeping Coffins". The first of the breed was the "Pat- rick Henry", launched two and a half months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. There were so many of them that the names sometimes seemed far-fetched, such as the "Stage Door Canteen"—named in honor of a New York recreation club for servicemen. More than 200 Liberties sank from storms or enemy torpedoes, many with heavy loss of life. As hospital ships they brought the wounded home. Some were sunk deliberately to provide a harbor breakwater on the invasion beaches of France. Then, for more than 20 years, they were the backbone ©f the world's tramp steamer merchant fleets. Finally, they were obsolete—too slow, too old and too expensive to operate. For a while they were consigned to mothball fleets, but time and other needs have taken their toll. Today there's only the Jeremiah O'Brien, the last of the once mighty armada of Liberty ships. Keflavik notes I • USO musical duo to headline tour at NATO base; perform at Hofn "Don and Cynthia," a USO show musical duet team, is scheduled to arrive at the NATO base Wednesday. The group will perform at the NATO base Thursday through Jan. 15, departing Jan. 16. Performances are scheduled as follows: Thursday—Depart for H-3 at 9 a.m. performance H-3 at 1 p.m. and at 3:30 will depart from H-3. Jan. 13—performance at the Wind- breaker starting at 8 p.m. Jan. 14—2 p.m. performance will" be at the Andrews Theater and then again the Officers' Club will have a performe ance at 9 p.m. Jan. 15 —2 p.m. performance will be at Rockville; the Top of the Rock will have a performance at 8 p.m. Program scheduled to honor Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday In keeping with the ideals of human dignity and equal opportunity, a program will be presented at Andrews Theater, Jan, 13 at 3 p.m. to commemorate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr, King's personal commitment to the rights and responsibilities of mankind serves as a continuing standard for all personnel. The program will include the well- known movie "Montgomery to Memphis," a talk by Technical Sergeant Clarence E. Davis who worked with Dr. King. A community chorus is being formed to sing for this occasion. Everyone is invited to attend this special program. Puffin Toastmistress club resolves to sharpen communication skills by Linda Stanley The Puffin Toastmistress Club marked the beginning of the new year with new officers: Linda Stanley, president; Margaret Dearmond, vice president; Rebecca Gudfinnsdottir, secretary and Jackie Howell, treasurer. The next meeting will be held at noon Jan. 13 at the home of Jackie Howell, Qtrs. 960-IF. The the of the meeting will be "New Year's Resolu- tions". Patricia Hand, an experience evaluator, will be evaluating the program and speeches. If you are interested in learning communication skills, come and join the fun of learning with others. International Toastmistress Clubs offers the opportunity to * develop your leadership skills * increase your communicative abilities as listener and speaker J learn efficient organization techniques * achieve self-improvement through building self-confidence * gain greater personal, occupa- tional and community recognition * participate in a continuing ex- perience in learning through as- sociation with an international non-profit educational organiza- tion. Volume 34 Number 1 Keflavik, Iceland January 6, 1978 GCA sets aircraft down with 'touch' THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME—Air Controller Chris Thompson was in the right place at the right time last week when she was honored with making GCA's 55,000th landing. She is pictured here with her boss Chief Air Controller Tom Baskins. Learn more about the GCA division and their historic landing by checking the story on page 3. Baggers to receive salaries Beginning in February for stateside only Stateside commissary baggers will be- gin receiving salaries instead of tips by mid-February under plans being readied by the military services. How- ever, overseas commissaries will not be affected by this policy. The services are complying with rulings by the Civil Service Commission, General Accounting Office and Justice Department. The rulings make baggers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and entitle them to minimum wage salaries. The Department of Defense has ex- hausted appeals of the rulings and is preparing a policy that stops the cur- rent tipping system for baggers in the continental United States. The policy may also require a "users' charge" for bagging services which will be passed on as a surcharge. The surcharge will be up to two per cent of a commissary purchase. Tentative DoD options call for pro- viding at least one self-service bagging register in each commissary for patrons who do not want to pay the surcharge. Commissaries may also offer bagging services, along with the surcharge, or require cashiers and customers to bag purchases. The policy will also call for dis- couraging or prohibiting tips for bag- gers. Legislation is pending in Congress which will restore the tipping system and exclude baggers from the FLSA. Meanwhile, an estimated $12,000,000 to $18,000,000 will be paid to com- missary baggers annually. The bag- gers will receive a minimum wage rate (effective Jan. 1) of $2.65 per hour. An estimated 10,000 baggers may also claim retroactive salaries as far back as May 1974. The retroac- tive payments could cost an estimated $35,000,000 to $53,000,000. DoD is considering a plan to pro- vide bagging services through contract work, as one alternative to self-ser- vice or paying salaries. JOC aids program with three purposes Air Forces Iceland as do other Air Force organizations has within it a group of junior officers organized to form a Junior Officers Committee (JOC). This committee meets once a month and is established to fulfill three re- sponsibilities: First, the council provides Air Force commanders with a forum to take full advantage of the initiative, innovative- ness and energy of junior officers in solving command problems. Second, the JOC provides a communications link be- tween senior and junior officers. Finally, the JOC is established for junior officers to involve themselves in community action and Improvement projects. Among its most recent projects, the JOC has participated in arranging and displaying aircraft tor the Air Force birthday celebration held in September at Hangar 830, organizing Air Forces Iceland's recent Christmas party and cooperating in Iceland Defense Forces Christmas Fund Drive. Last school year the JOC sponsored a tutoring program for students at A.T. Mahan School and again this year like plans are also underway. The JOC arranged a visit recently by Air Force Military Personnel Center officers to explain personnel policies to Air Force members. In short, AFI's Junior Officers Committee is a community minded organ- ization which searches for ways to be- come more involved and helpful to the command and community. All Air Force junior officers are en- couraged to attend the committee's meet- ings and become involved in its activi- ties a spokesman said. Anyone who either has ideas for JOC projects or desires additional information about JOC should contact Captain Mike Fox at 4671.

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