The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.02.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 17.02.1978, Blaðsíða 1
Navy Supply Corps to feature 183rd year tonight Navy Supply Corps personnel will cele- brate their 183rd birthday with a Supply Corps Ball to be held at the Top of the Rock. Cocktails will begin at 6:30 p.m. and dinner will be served at 7:15. The menu will include tossed salad, steamboat round, baked or mashed potatoes, peas, carrots and corn, cake and ice cream. Together with the traditional cake- cutting by the youngest and the oldest supply personnel, the history of the Supply Corps will be presented in a skit. Musical entertainment for dancing will be furnished. Each lady who attends will receive a corsage courtesy of the Supply Corps Wives and Women in Supply, who are in charge of the annual ball. The Supply Corps marks its beginning by an act of Congress dated Feb. 23, 1795 which established a purveyor of public supplies and instituted Navy pro- curements for supply both afloat and on shore. The purveyor of public supplies, the government's first purchasing agent, was assigned the responsibility for procuring the supplies necessary to outfit the ships in the Navy. On April 30, 1798, an act which created the Navy Department also includ- ed the assignment to the Navy Department of the responsibility for obtaining naval stores and equipments for all naval agents. The term purser was used to identify those personnel involved in purveying public supplies. Changes in supply administration were gradual and it was not until Aug. 31, 1842 when the bureau organization of the Navy Department was created. The Bureau of Provisions and Clothing was one of the bureaus created at this time with the responsibility for accomplish- ing the task of providing supply and fiscal support to the fleet. After the War of 1812, the important responsibilities of the purser were fully recognized, although it was not until 1847 that military rank and pre- cedence was given to the pursers. By a general order issued in 1847 and legal- ized by Congressional action in 1847, pursers of more than 12 years service were to rank with commanders and those with less than 12 years with lieuten- ants. Pursers were to rank with sur- geons, according to their date of com- missioning. A Congressional act in June 1860 pro- vided that the pursers in the Navy should hereafter be styled paymaster. An early qualification for promotion was that they possess the ability to speak French and Spanish with sufficient fluency to do business with those na- tions. Another requirement, designed to en- sure professional competency, was a certificate from the fourth auditor of the Treasury, who was responsible for auditing Navy accounts, that the pur- ser's accounts has been kept to the satisfaction of the Treasury Depart- ment. A Congressional act on July 17, 1861 required that promotion to the Corps of Paymasters be made from a list of assistant paymasters. A year later, another requirement was written into statutes, which speci- fied that the Chief of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, be appointed from the list of paymasters of the Navy of not less than 10 years standing. Thus, for the first time, it was legally impossible for the Paymaster General to be a civilian. Eight years later, the Congressional act on July 15, 1870, officially established the Pay Corps of the Navy, a designator which was retained until 1919, when the present title of the Supply Corps was adopted. On Oct. 13, 1966, the title of the Supply Corps director was changed by the Secretary of the Navy from Pay- master General to Chief of Supply Corps, the title now held by Rear Admiral Eugene A. Grinstead. This is the history and heritage of the Supply Corps and the 183rd birthday. WhiiB&Fakon Volume 34 Number 7 Keflavik, Iceland February 17, 1978 Blacks advance in industry,business; make innovative contributions by TSgt Clarence E. Davis After studying United States history, it appears that only white Americans were involved in the advancements of this great nation. Somewhere, the real history has been lost, stolen or strayed from most American history books. Today, as an example, if one wanted to learn the real or the total U.S. his- tory, he would have to take American history and then two or three sociology courses because history has not yet been placed in its proper place. To this end, Afro-American Month must continue so that all Americans will know more of the total history. How much has the Afro-American con- tributed to the advancement of the world's leading nation? Blacks have made important and revolutionary contributions to indus- try, though there were relatively few of them in specialized jobs. One such man was Jan Matzeliger, a Keflavik notes Priest to Visit m Father Bob Bailey, an Episcopalian priest with the Royal Air Force in Kin- oss, Scotland, will be visiting the base Wednesday and Thursday. An Episcopalian service of holy com- munion will be held Thursday at the chapel at 7:30 p.m. For those who are interested in meet- ing Father Bailey, potluck dinner will be hosted at quarters 630-F at 6. p.m. For further information contact the chapel at 4211 or Lou Ann Laurance at 4455. Car checks go on A note to remind all motorists on the NATO base: auto inspections will con- tinue Monday through March 16. The schedule for next week follows: Mon.—JO-6070—J0-6196 Tue.—J0-6197—J0-6323 Wed.—JO-6324—JO-6450 Thu.—JO-6451—JO-6577 U of Md needs profs Qualified instructors are being sought for the University of Maryland. A master's degree is required. Call the Navy Campus Office at 6226 for more in- formation. shoemaker's apprentice in Philadelphia and later a worker in a shoe factory, who spent 10 years working on a shoe laster—a machine that attached uppers of shoes to the sole—that radically altered the shoe manufacturing indus- try. In 1883, Matzeliger patented his lasting machine, and the United Shoe Manufacturing Company, which purchased the invention, captured 98 per cent of the shoe machinery trade. In a short time, Matzeliger's method spread across the world. As early as 1843, Henry Blair of Maryland, a free black, was awarded the first patent to be granted to one of his race for a corn harvester that he invented. Norbert Rillex of Louisiana in- vented and patented in 1846 a vacuum pan that brought fundamental changes to the sugar refining industry. Elijah McCoy of Detroit began work in 1852 on items concerned with lubrication and eventually patented an automatic lubricator for continuous operation of certain train and ship engines. McCoy received 57 patents for other inventions along the same line. In 1884, John J. Parker invented a screw for tobacco presses and set up his own company to manufacture his device. Granville T. Woods of Cincinnati started working about 1885 on inventions in several fields, including electronics and steam boilers and automatic air brakes. Some of his inventions were sold to the General Electric Company, the Ameri- can Bell Telephone Company and the Westinghouse Air Brake Company. Thus, the blacks, who were generally excluded from skilled positions in in- dustry, made vital contributions to the increased mechanization of American manufacturing through a number of re- markable inventions. Some Macks organized toward the end of the century to recruit more blacks into business and industry. These leaders hoped to stimulate black capitalism through ownership of busi- nesses that would provide jobs for blacks. Booker T. Washington, the educator, founded the National Negro Business League in 1900, to further the move- ment. The league expanded to more than 300 branches and stimulated com- munication and economic progress among black businessmen. By 1901, the black community had many black businessmen who operated their own enterprises, some founding funeral homes, banks and insurance firms to serve black needs. A few blacks amassed substantial wealth within their own communities, but the majority of blacks contin- ued to depend upon the white world for their livelihood. afaf: Air Force Assistance Fund Campaign drive to begin Wednesday Here's an acronym for you: AFAF. Perhaps it's more familiar when spelled out: Air Force Assistance Fund. Either way, you should put it in a separate category from all others. AFAF is the Air Force's only fund-raising campaign, conducted solely for the ben- efit of its members and their de- pendants. The 1978 campaign will be conducted Wednesday through March 31 to support the Air Force Aid Society, Air Force Village in San Antonio and the Enlisted Men's Widows Home Foundation (Teresa Village) at Ft. Walton Beach, FL. Each of these organizations benefits segments of the Air Force community and demonstrates how "we take care of our own." It could be a young airman who needs emergency funds or a retiring couple looking for a permanent home with people of similar interests. People can find happiness, security, and help with their problems through the emergency relief and charitable organizations of AFAF. But why should anyone who hasn't already benefited contribute to the campaign? One reason is that a contribution can be a form of insurance. For example, maybe you or your spouse aren't thinking about living in a retirement village, but you can't be sure what will happen 10, 20 or 30 years from now. Support now will help ensure that the villages will be there if you need them. You may not need the services of the Air Force Aid Society, but then again, you may. In 1977, AFAS provided some $1.7 million in emergency grants and loans and $2.5 million in educational help. Liberalized policies for emergency assistance loans and grants have been put into effect. Professional entertainment for al Every person has his or her favorite song or type of music. If one were to a ask five people what their favorite song was, there would be five different an- swers. What is appealing to you may not. interest your neighbor. But, one thing Is certain. Country music remains at the top of the list of favorites and all NATO base personnel, regardless of their brand of music, will have a unique opportunity to see a country music star in person. That's right, Hank Thompson—a giant in the country music field—is coming to town for four very special performances. Tickets are now on sale at the Recrea- tion Office, the Tour Office, the Top of the Rock, the Officers' Club and, for E-7 personnel and above, at the Windbreaker Club. For the first time in many, years, a professional showman is coming to the NATO base. Citizens will truly enjoy an hour of fast-moving entertainment. Tickets cost $6 each for adults and $3 each for children for the two per- formances at Andrews Theater. Hank Thompson will be at Andrews on Wednesday and Thursday nights (Mar. 8 and 9) for 6:30 p.m. performances. Then, at 9 p.m. on Wednesday night, Hank and the Brazos Valley Boys will move to the "0" Club. Tickets for this show will cost $7.50 per person and will include an additional hour of dance music. There will also be a special western-style buffet. Following the performance at Andrews on Thursday night, the Hank Thompson show will move to the Top of the Rock for a 9 p.m. performance. For the price of $7.50, patrons will enjoy Hank Thompson at his best followed by an hour of dancing by the Brazos Valley Boys. The club will also have a special buffet available. Although your preferences for music may not include country music, it's not often that you'll have the chance to see a professional entertainer. Plan now to attend. Buy your tickets this payday. You won't regret it. If you want more information, contact the Recreation Office at 7500.

x

The White Falcon

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: The White Falcon
https://timarit.is/publication/382

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.