The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 31.03.1978, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 31.03.1978, Blaðsíða 1
Channel two weather chart explained Relax with music and weather on AFRTS Channel 2. The current report from the Naval Weather Service Environmental De- tachment (NWSED) is displayed contin- uously for everyone's use. Although the screen may look compli- cated, it's really a fairly simple code, describing in detail the weather at the NATO base. And it's updated every hour on the hour. The weather is coded several differ- ent ways, but the easiest one to read is the part right after the word "AVIA- TION". In order, cloud height and amount of cloud cover, prevailing visibility and any weather changes to visibility, sea level pressure, air temperature, dew point temperature, wind direction and speed, aircraft altimeter setting (you can set your home barometer to this value) and remarks are covered in a few lines after the word "AVIATION". Here is a typical sequence: AVIATION 15 SCT 30 OVC 3SW-981/32/30/ 3511G25/897. Cloud cover reported in symbols The amount of cloud cover is repor- ted in symbols such as SCT which means scattered clouds or partly cloudy; BKN meaning broken clouds or mostly cloudy, OVC meaning overcast or cloudy and oc- casionally CLR or clear skies. The cloud bases are reported in hundreds of feet. For example, eight means 800 feet and 25 means 2,500 feet. So, the first part of the example should read: Scattered clouds and 1,500 feet and overcast clouds at 3,000 feet. Occasionally, the height will be prefixed by a letter which means that the height is M=measured, E=estimated or W=indefinite. An "X" means that the sky is obscured by snow fall, for instance. Prevailing visibility given in miles Prevailing visibility is reported next, in miles, with the weather changes to visibility (if any) following. If the visibility is seven miles or great- er, normally no weather change is re- ported. The letters "L", "R" and "RW" mean drizzle, rain or rain showers while "S", "SW" or "SP" mean some type of snow. "BS" means blowing snow and "F" stands for fog. Minus or plus signs, following the letters, indicate light or heavy weather variations. In the example given, the visibility is three miles on the average, changed by light snow showers. Millibars denote sea level pressure Sea level pressure is next. This value is reported in millibars and the first digit is omitted. Sea level pressure at Keflavik ranges between 940 and 1,025 millibars. The pressure in the example is 998.1 millibars. Confused? Well, it takes a' little practice, but soon you'll get the hang of it and amaze your stateside friends The next group of numbers are the air temperature (32 degrees Fahrenheit in the example) and the dew point tem- perature (30 degrees F). If the two numbers are verjt far apart, watch for static electricity because the atmo- sphere is dry. If the air temperature is below 39 degrees Fahrenheit, watch for icy roads and sidewalks. The next four digits are wind di- rection and speed: Gusty winds are indicated after the letter "G" In the example, 3511G25 should read: Winds from the north-northwest at 11 knots, gusting to 25 knots. Directions are simple: North is 36, east is 09, south is 18 and west is 27, just like on a compass. Remember, the wind is from the indicated direction. Finally, the next group of numbers tells the aircraft altimeter setting. This value is always around 28, 29 or 30 inches of mercury and the first digit is omitted. So, 897 means 28.97 inches. Set this number on your home barometer. TREND indicates six-hour forecast There is a "TREND" forecast on the bottom half of the screen. This is an outlook for the next six hours and is coded like the aviation sequence line. "VT" indicates valid time. TREND fore- cast lines, following the words "TEMPO", "INTER" or ''GRADU", describe weather conditions that are expected TEMPOrarily or INTERmittently (more frequently than TEMPO) or GRADUally throughout the fore- cast period. The people at the NWSED are there to answer your questions. The detachment is located on the second floor of Bldg. 810 (Navy Air Terminal). Call 7829 for questions about Channel 2 or 4331 for the latest recorded weather. Whiie/^Fa&on Volume 34 Number 13 Keflavik, Iceland March 31, 1978 Naval station member wins award Construction Electrician First Class Harold D. Pape, Public Works Department power line supervisor, has been selected by the Society of American Military En- gineers as recipient of the Marvin Shields award for 1977. The Marvin Shields award honors a heroic Seabee who was killed in action. The award is offered annually to an enlisted Seabee who has demonstrated technical and leadership skills in mili- tary construction or maintenance. Air Force Association CEl Pape was selected for his ex- ceptional leadership and management abilities as power line supervisor. Stationed in Iceland for the past three years, CEl Harold Pape was at a loss for words when he received the award Wednesday. Lieutenant Ronald Hudson, assistant Public Works officer, commented, "CEl Pape was well-surprised, but more than well-deserved." CEl Pape was selected as "Seabee of the Year" at the Public Works Depart- Membership drive tomorrow The Air Force Association will start its annual Keflavik membership drive, beginning tomorrow. AFA is a national nonprofit or- ganization with no personal, political or commercial interests. It pub- lishes Air Force magazine, the largest aerospace magazine in the free world, and currently has more than 155,000 members including both active duty and civilian personnel. The association's record for the past 31 years, working for the Air Force and its people is second to none, a membership spokesman states. Most importantly, the organization draws no line in going to bat for every man and woman in the Air Force, military or civilian, campaign officials say. Air Force Chief of Staff General David C. Jones Jr. has also endorsed LACCO registration the campaign by saying that "AFA is the one professional airpower society which continually works for the entire Air Force community." The AFA is open to all United States citizens. Dues are $13 per year or $30 for a three-year period. As an added incentive to join the AFA during this drive, AFA will send to all new members signing up in April a special bonus issue of Air Force maga- zine. This bonus issue is entitled the Soviet Aerospace Almanac and contains indepth information on the Soviet Air Force that is available from no other single source in the free world. The Junior Officers' Council and Enlisted Advisory Council are jointly sponsoring the membership drive. For information or application call Lieu- tenant Jim Uken at 4675 or 4671. New courses announced Los Angeles Community College Over- seas will be offering two new courses, beginning April 10. The first is Accounting II. The class focuses on principles and procedures relating to partnerships and corporations. Subjects such as cost, branch and departmental accounting will be introduced as well as interpretation of financial statements and management controls. Students will have individual work papers to further enhance understanding of the subject. The second class offered will be Oral Communications. The goal of the class is for each student to become a more effective speaker and listener. The class is open to all interested in- dividuals. Subjects include public speaking, how to prepare a speech, how to better relate to other individuals and is particularly useful for super- visors who wish to enhance employer- employee relations. Registration for both classes is Monday through April 7 at the Navy Campus Bldg. 638. Sign-ups will be taken from 8 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 5 p.m. ment annual ball in March 1977. After- wards, he was nominated by the Public Works Department for ,the Marvin Shields award. "As the supervisor of maintenance and repair of all overhead electrical power distribution, everyone on this base who goes to flick a light switch on expects the light to work and its my job to make sure that the public gets the reaction they expect," CEl Pape says. To all Seabees nominated for the Marvin Shields award, CEl Pape displays hard work, professional competence, de- dication and pride in the Navy. Viewing the keen competition by Seabees throughout the world, Petty Officer Pape and Naval Station Keflavik can be proud of his selection for this coveted award, the citation points out. AWARD WINNER—CEl Harold D. Pape, Public Works Department, was selected as the recipient of the 1977 Marvin Shields Award by the Society of American Military Tngineers. TV viewers voice opinions A television survey was distributed last August to various departments and commands throughout the Naval Station. A total of 3,000 surveys were sent by Navy Broadcasting Service, Detachment Eight. There were 797 forms returned to the detachment and the results follow: The majority of those polled—72 per cent—were day shift workers and the most preferred viewing time was from 6 to 10 p.m. Most of the viewers indicat- ed that they view AFTV an average of four or more hours daily. In the sports department, 485 respon- dents indicated a preference for less sports while 312 indicated a desire for more sports coverage on Channel Four. M*A*S*H was the runaway victor for the "favorite program" category. Fol- lowing close behind M*A*S*H were Baret- ta, Starsky and Hutch, NBC Mystery Movie, Star Trek and Charlie's Angels. Several of the programs listed as favorites are not presently being aired at this detachment but were on during the time of the survey. Channel Four's "family viewing hours" were satisfactory to 65 per cent of the respondents. This station attempts to schedule family type shows from 7 to 9 p.m. The recent television survey rein- forced the fact that the majority of the viewing audience is under the age of 30. The 21-25 age group comprised 33 per cent of the survey returns while 70 per cent of the viewing audience was com- prised of the 20-year-old or under through 30 years of age. Three hundred-twenty respondents were high school graduates while 337 had some college education. The final results of the television survey have been forwarded to the Ameri- can Forces Radio and Television Service, Los Angeles and to the Director, U.S. Broadcasting Service, Washington. The survey will be studied by both commands to learn the preference of the NATO base audience. •

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