The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 07.10.1983, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 07.10.1983, Blaðsíða 3
October 7, 1983/THE WHITE FALCON 3 Ceremonies, awards presentations mark 'end-of-an-era' departure Patrol Squadron Eleven, under the direc- tion of CDR John Ryan, commanding officer, departed for their home in Brunswick, ME, this week — concluding its second straight record breaking Keflavik deployment in the past 19 months. In a ceremony at the VP Hangar last week, RADM Ronald E. Narmi , Com- mander Fleet Air Keflavik, addressed the assembled personnel from ASWOC, NAVFAC, AIMD, NSGA and PATRON 11. In his remarks, RADM Narmi said: "I've never, in my 28 years, seen ASW done in a more professional manner than it is being done right now." All in all, however, it was VP-ll's day. After the address by the admiral the squad- ron presented awards to eight individuals and the admiral reenlisted AT2 Donald Hol- man -- VP-ll's 81st of the quarter. Petty Officer Holman's reenlistment typifies the impressive accomplishments which the "Proud Pegasus" squadron has amassed during this deployment and all of FY 83. The squadron has made unpresedented pro- gress in fulfilling their three-pronged philosophy: People, Safety and Mission. The squadron has "lived" its sense of unit pride by winning the Patrol Squadrons Bruns- wick Golden Anchor Award for Retention for three of the last four quarters and has concluded the final quarter of FY83 with over 70% first-term retention, an unprece- dented achievement. While on deployment the squadron lived its commitment to com- munity by contributing both time and effort to such projects as the USO refurbishing project, opening of the local school, con- ducting a fund-raising project for the Am- erican Red Cross and playing a vital role in the NATO Base's tremendously successful 1983 Radiothon for the benefit of Navy Re- lief. Safety is paramount in VP-ll's list of priorities. It currently holds the PATR0N- WINGSLANT Safety Award -- encompassing all East Coast VP squadrons, presented to the squadron with the most impressive safety program. VP-11 has flown over 40,000 con- secutive accident-free hours, many of which were flown in Iceland's harsh climate. Commitment to excellence in areas of both safety and people has been directly responsible for the squadron's accomplish- Aided by CAPT Thomas Hall. COMFAIRKEF Chief of Staff! John Ryan; CDR Rick Maealis. COMFAIRKEF Ops Officer", team. RADM Ronald E. Narmi. COMFAIRKEF. does the honors VP-ll's Commanding Officer. CDR and others of the impressive ASW in cutting the ceremonial cake. ment in the third element of its philosophy -- mission. The statement of these ac- complishments climaxed the awards ceremony this past week. VP-11, after setting two operational ASW records in its 1982 deploy- ment, showed its consistency of operational excellence by setting four additional rec- ords during this deployment -- an accomp- lishment not approached during recent years in VP ops. Because of this achievement, VP-11 was declared the "ASW World Record Holder." The largest cake ever made in Keflavik and a sign unveiled at the cere- mony presented appropriate reminders. VP-11, NAS Brunswick's final representa- tive to Keflavik for the near future, leav- es Naval Station, Keflavik and Iceland with some enviable records. It's commitment to total quality involvement was justly recog- nized this day. "Pegasus Pride -- Catch It!" We did! 208 years: From sails to reactors By JOCM Merle F. Jacobsen When our Navy began 208 years ago, the first person on a ship to spot another ship was- likely to be an ordinary seaman high in the rigging. Today, the first person to know of an approaching craft— be it above, under or on the sea -- quite possibly will be a junior sailor who spots a blip on a screen. If the Revolutionary-era sailor (we'll call him Johnny Yank) were to step through a time warp into today's Navy, he'd probably be overwhelmed by technology -- nuclear propulsion, whirring computers and machines that fly off a ship and return. He'd pro- bably be most at home with the deck force, where many things are done the same way as they were two centuries ago. Yank undoubtedly would learn some new tricks from contemporary boatswain's mates and likely would teach them a few things that were lost in the art of marlinspike seamanship over the years. He'd know what to do if he were aboard one of the Navy's battleships and was told by a BM2 to holy- stone the teak decks. When Yank joined the Navy, it may have been as a member of a privateer recruited by George Washington to fight King George's Royal Navy of 207 ships, the world's most powerful fleet at the time. On Oct. 13, 1775, Yank's status became somewhat more official when the Continental Congress auth- orized outfitting two ships. In December 1775, the U.S. Navy was ready to do battle with its force of four warships and four escort vessels. "The first beginning of our Navy," John Paul Jones wrote later, "was, as navies rank, so singularly small that I am of the opinion it has no precedence in history." Yank would be amazed that the U.S. Navy today has more than a half million people serving on active duty with nearly 200,000 who are sailors for a weekend a month and two weeks of a year. He also might find it incredible that today's Navy is building toward a 600-ship force. When told that four million people served during World War II, he'd be flabbergasted. Yank, remembering hardtack and salted meat, probably would be pleased to eat in the crew's mess of a modern warship where sailors eat planned, well-rounded meals. If our Revolutionary sailor liked a nip of de- mon rum, he might be disappointed to dis- cover that it went the way of flogging. Women in the Navy, much less on ships, also would surprise Yank. The nearest thing he'd remember of women in the Navy would be the sloop Katy, later renamed Providence, (See 208, Page 4) Jax-based VP-24 assumes VP duties The Batmen of Patrol Squadron 24 have arri ing and fishing" expedition. VP-24 earlier t unit, relieving the Pegasus of VP-11. Under Batmen will be involved in some "big game" Soviet's Northern Fleet, especially their extensive submarine activity. Under the leadership of CDR Wayne M. Vickery, the squadron has been aggressively preparing for this deployment since its re- turn from Rota, Spain, earlier this year. The Batmen's comprehensive, at-home train- ing has resulted in 12 of 12 crews attain- ing an "Alfa" or maximum ASW (antisubmarine warfare) proficiency status during this period. Patrol Squadron 24 was commissioned on April 10, 1943 at NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. The squadron was originally designated Bombing Squadron 104, but was changed to Heavy Patrol Squadron 4 in November 1946. In August 1948 it was redesignated as Pa- trol Squadron 24. ved in Keflavik on an extended winter "hunt- his week assumed the duties of the PATR0NKEF the operational command of CINCLANTFLT, the fishing -- monitoring the activities of the CDR W.M. Vickery Following World War II the squadron par- ticipated in the testing and develop- ment of the "Bat," the Navy's first air- to-surface guided missile. As a re- sult, the nickname "Bat Squadron" and "Batmen of VP-24" has carried down through the years. Work on the Bat mis- sile also inspired the squadron's fam- ous Batgirl insignia.

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The White Falcon

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