The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 06.01.1945, Blaðsíða 4

The White Falcon - 06.01.1945, Blaðsíða 4
'4 REVIEWS OF NEW MOVIES ON NISSEN HUT CIRCUIT The brief reviews appearing below represent an attempt on our part to give you some idea of the new movies which wilt be placed on circuit here within the next few days. Additional reviews, completing the present list, will appear next week. writer for this "Gav Nineti MY PAL WOLF (RKO film starring six-year- old Jill Esmond) A picture featuring a little girl and a clog scarcely needs anything more to give it ap- peal — but this one has a fairly credible story, too. Ev- en the rare individual who doesn't like dogs will like MY PAL WOLF. MINISTRY OF FEAR (Paramount film starring Ray Milland, Marjorie Reyn- olds) This is another "spy thril- ler." It begins in a lunatic asylum which at times the audience may be tempted to think is the residence of the director. By no means come in on the middle of this pic- ture or you'll never know what's up. (P.S. — It's reaP ]y not as bad as all this, and anyway you're sure to like Marjorie Reynolds). RHAPSODY IN, BLUE [(Warner, Bros, film starring Joan Leslie, Robert Alda, Alexis Smith) Many of you have already iseen this at its premiere showings. To sum 'tip the comments we've heard - the music's topnotch, the old- timers (Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor and others) are good to see again, and Joan Les- lie "just can't be beat," but most audiences found the picture a little too long (two hours, twenty-five minutes). BOWERY TO BROADWAY '(Universal film starring Jack . . Oakie, Maria Montez) If Universal hired a script es".flicker "it got robbed!" But maybe you've been slay- ing in nights during these past four or five years and haven't seen any "old-time musicals." Some of the music is pretty good, though. SUNDAY DINNER FOR A SOLDIER YTwentieth-Century-Fox film starring Ann Baxter, John Hodiak) Don't be misled by the name of this picture — ex- cept for a very brief sequen- ce at the end it isn't "a flag- waver," but rather a very un- assuming little screen play about a family living on a houseboat and preparing to entertain a solider — any soldier — for a Sunday din- ner. The outdoor sets of rur- al America are very good to. look at — and so is Ann Bax- ter. We think you'll enjoy this film. " THE DOUGHGIRLS (Warner Bros, film starring Ann Sheridan, Alexis Smith, Jane Wyman) A: hotel room in over- crowded Washington is the backdrop for this screen play which portrays the tribula- tions of a bevy of curvacious cuties who waver on the brink of matrimony for an hour and forty minutes and then plunge over. It's meant to be funny, and more often than not it is. TALL IN THE SADDLE. (RKO film starring John Wayne, Ella Raines) This is the new western the critics are talking about. They like it. We do too. "The hero," John Wayne, isn't quite as shy in this sage-bush saga as the usual run of west- ern flicker heroes, with the result that there are some fairly torrid love scenes be- tween our John and Ella Raines. There are horses in it too. CONSPIRATORS (Warner Bros, film starring Hedy I^amarr, Paul Henreid) If you like movies about spies you'll really go for this one, for it's fairly crawling with them. If you don't like " spy pietures" - Hedy Lam- arr's in it, and as beautiful as ever. OUR HEARTS WERE YOUNG AND GAY. (Paramount film starring Dianna Lynn, Gail Russell) Back in the 'Twenties' two young American girls, su- specting the existence of land on the other side of the Atlantic, made an ocean vojr- age (unescorted) and wound up in — among other places —the look-out on top of Not- re Dame Cathedral in Paris, where they spent a night shivering in their under- wear. It's an amusing little picture. LOST IN A HAREM. (MGM film starring Bud Ab- bott and Lou Costello) Abbott and Costello fans will undoubtedly laugh themselves into a frenzy over this one. Others may derive more amusement from a field manual. The Wolf by Sansohe C -or'ght 1944 t» Leonard ributcd l.< Omp Newspaper Service •£& ¦ivy>F'>i-'^> ^, ">'"^ !\/7 ^ mi ¦ Im v"Ho .has a peculiar hold on women!" British Leader Says Sp s In a recent address to the House of Lords, Viscount Templewood — formerly Sir Samuel Hoare — described Spain as "practically a semi- occupied country'" during the greater part of the five years he spent there as Brit- ish ambassador. "Although Spain was not militarily occupied for those early years, she was morally occupied," he said, adding that the Nazis "had great in- fluence in the police and in the press." i He revealed that Gestapo agents seized men and wom- en in Spanish territory and took them into Germany or occupied countries to be killed or tortured. Pravda, A. & N. Journal Engage In Verbal Singles! Over Who's Doing What T© Beat The Germans A battle of the inkpots has hcen going on in recent weeks between the U.S. magazine, Army and Navy Journal, and the Soviet daily Pravda. Last week the ver-. bal slugfest approached the boiling point when a Pravda editorial writer answered what he interpreted as a Journal implication that Russia had not fulfilled the military decisions of the Te- heran Conference. The Pravda writer stated that there are practically as many German divisions en- gaged on the southern sector of the Eastern Front as are engaged against all Allied forces in the West. Moscow News, only Eng- lish-language newspaper in the Soviet Union, joined the battle to announce that on Dec. 1, 220 enemy divisions were tied up in the East, of which no less than 200 were German. Seventy, the news- paper said, were located at the southern end of the front. Assailing the Army and Navy Journal as "a source of pro-Hitlerite propag- anda," Pravda claimed that the Journal had tried to dis- miss its criticism with "hypo- critical phrases, tr-y5*^ \n I create the imprer: ;on that P' had been misunderstood." Gen. Hershey Says Workers Will Stay On Job Or Else — According to an order by Draft Director Maj. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, all men between the ages of 18 and .17 with occupational defer- ments who leave their war jobs without the permission of their draft hoard will be reclassified for immediate military service. "It is increasingly necess- ary," Gen. Hershey declar- ed in his order to Selective Service Boards, "that all per- sons, and particularly regi- strants 18 through 37, parti- cipate to the full exenl of their abilities either in the armed forces or the civilian war effort." Previously, men 27 or over were given deferments that made them relatively free of the draft. Along with the announcement. Hershey "guessed" there will be a 10 to-20 percent hike in induct- ions within the next few months. Its ¦ "7 MAKE EVERY Wh PAY DAY m BOND DAY JOIN THE PAY-ROLL • SAVINGS PLAN * INTENTION WAS GOOD! In Dallas, Tex., a woman excitedly called police head- quarters and exclaimed: "My hoy has been hit by a car." Upon which, two squad cars and an ambulance rush- ed to. the scene to find that "Mv Boy" was a doy. 6! PHOTO OF THE WEEK PANTS PRESSED WHILE YOU WAIT Cpl. Carl V. Carlson of the "Engrs. has caught a scene typical of GI life anywhere from Iceland to the Hebrides. Although the Cpl. is reluctant to "nam* the fellows who are in his picture, he has admitted that a super-duper party was on at the Red Cross and the ARC Commando on the right wanted to look his best for his "stulka." For winning first prize in The White Falcon "GI Photo Contest," Carlson has received a carton of cigarettes and an 8 X It) ehlargment of his photo. All entries in the "GI Photo Contest" should be sent to the Editor, The White Falcon, Base Special Service.

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The White Falcon

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