The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.02.1945, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 17.02.1945, Blaðsíða 1
OUR FORCES — ALWAYS ALERT Vol. VII. ICELAND, Saturday, February 17, 1915. No. 22. Above, the grave of a German officer located at the weather station at Cape Sussi, Shannon Island, who had been killed when scouting party was ambushed. Below, some of the 28 German prisoners of war taken aboard the USCG "Northland" after they had scuttled their trawler during a futile attempt to reestablish a radio- weather station in northeast Greenland. Famed Novel Comes To Life In Premieres At Fldh'se, ARC Club 23 IBC movie-goers tomorr- ow night will be treated to another and important "Hollywood World Premi- ere" when A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN is, presented on the Andrews Pieldhouse screen at 2000 hours and at ARC Club 23 at 1900 and 2100 hours. Boasting a cast of capable and well-known screenland performers, the film is an adaptation of Betty Smith's best-selling novel. James Dunn, Joan Blondell, Dorothy McGuire, Peggy Ann Gardner, Lloyd Nolan and James Gleason bead the list of players. A TREE GROWS IN BBOOKLYN relates the story of the poor Nolan fam- ily of Brooklyn's Williams- burg district and their strug- gle for a livelihood. Into this tale are woven numerous de- lightful characters taken right from life itself. Natur- ally, though, some of theper- (Continued on Page 7) Further Mission Against reenland v.: H mm ID, HUNGARY Newspapers i n the U.S. carried the announcement early this month that Maj. Gen. William S. Key, who left the Iceland Base Com- mand last December after being its head for a year- and-a-half, has been named chief American represent- ative on a joint commission to take over control of Hungary. Four U.S. military repres- entatives have been appoint- ed to the Allied Control Commission. In addition to Maj. Gen. Key, the following Ameri- cans will serve on the joint Soviet-American-British bo- ard: Col. Dallas S. Towns- end, Col. Frank W. Gilles- pie, and Capt. William S. Dietrick of the US. Navy. Lt. Col. Henry G. Simmonite has been named executive officer. Two of the Americans on the commission are, thus, men who have served in Ice- land, for Col. Townsend left here onl\r recently, having served as chief Civil Affairs officer, succeeding Col. Lisle.'Word has come from Gen. Key that both he and Col. Townsend, and others in the group, were in Italy recently,await-ing departure. German Leaders Prepare For Future War By Urging Mothers To Produce! Produce! Produce! While transplanting and starving the population of conquered countries, the German Government has ac- tually achieved a rise in the births of its own people. "As Germany's chances militarily grow dimmer and dimmer, her prospects for conring out-aheadin this war loom brighter," says Eugene Tillinger, writing in the Mil- waukee Journal. "Few peop- le are aware that alongside her regular war, fought with the usual weapons, Ger- many is waging a second, invisible war. This 'biopolit- ical war,' as she calls it, con- sists in the building up of her own population and the cutting down of her neigh- bors' in the hope of dominat- ing the continent despite military defeat." Tillinger supports his con- tention with liberal extracts from German newspapers, and from the speeches of (Continued on Page 3) REPORT TELLS OF AIR OPERATIONS FROM ¦ ICELAND WHICH BOMBED' OUT ENEMY i WEATHER BASE IN 1943 The following official account of the wiping out of German weather observation bases on Greenland was released for military and civilian publication here this week by IBC Headquarters: Fragmentary reports have been received before of what has been a rather closely guarded military secret—opera- tions, partly from Iceland, in eliminating German weather observation bases located in Greenland. Fuller details appeared a little more than a week ago in news- papers in the U.S., which have now arrived here. The whole story covers a period of several months and in- volves operations against the enemy both by U.S. naval and military personnel. Iceland's importance in war-ime operations in the North Atlantic is again evidenced in an account such as the one now appearing. When the story can be fully told, more of that significance will appear—such as raids by Iceland-based aircraft in the sinking of German sub- marines in the North Atlantic. The dispatches now published in America declare that four Coast Guard cutters, operating in ice-packed Arctic waters, smashed a "determined German effort" to estab- (Continued on Page 2) i GEN. DUNCAN CROWNS SIX-STRIPE COLLINS "KING OF FBIs"—HOPES WAR ENDS BEFORE HE'S ELIGIBLE FOR SAME Stating that he hopes that the war is over long before he's eligible to become a wearer of six overseas strip- es, Brig. Gen. Early E. W. Duncan, Commanding the IBC, Tuesday night crown- ed Cpl. Nicholas H. Collins, QM man from Barnwell, S.C., "King of the FBIs" at ABC Club 14. Collins has served in Iceland since Aug. 7, 1941. Following the actual "crowning" of the King, Gen. Duncan introduced Miss Arndis SigurSard. Iceland's "Pin-up Queen," who imme- diately gave Collins a big, smacking kiss. Then, to the delight of the packed throng of GIs, the "King" and "Queen" danced to "People Will Say We're In Love." A reception was held in the reading room following the presentation where Gen. Duncan was the special (Continued on Page 2) "King of the FBIs," Cpl, Nicholas H. Collins, dance with Iceland's GI pinup girl, Miss Arndis SigurSard. of Beykjavik at Club 14 fol- lowing his "coronation."

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The White Falcon

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