The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 24.02.1945, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 24.02.1945, Blaðsíða 1
OUR FORCES — ALWAYS ALERT Vol. VII. ICELAND, Saturday, February U, 1M5. No. 23. German Seamen Questioned Here Said Gestapo Kept Them In Fight, Expressed Fear Of American Planes From Iceland The following story of German prisoners-of-war captured in Greenland is an official IBC release to The White Falcon. The war ought to end in May -— with an Allied vic- tory. That was one of the predictions made last Nov- ember by a German prison- er-of-war, interrogated here in Iceland, as one of more than 70 of his countrymen interviewed during the past two years by the IBC Count- er Intelligence Corps' Pris- oner-of-\Var Interrogation Section. Secret documents hold the record of information glean- ed from talks with all these wearers of the swastika. Among the Germans ques- tioned there was decided variance as to willingness to talk. "Why should I talk?" asked a German enlisted man, when questioned here, adding, "Your fliers never give us any information." Greenland Posts Lonely. As to life in Greenland, of those who had spent time there before the bases were liquidated, there was little comment. The remote posts were lonely ones. None of them were held for long. There were some German magazines of recent date to help pass the time away. There was card playing, chess —• and conversation. Two of Germany's best qualified weather experts were brought here in 1943, after the Sabine Island bases in,'Greenland had been wip- ed out by bombing raids car- ried out by Iceland-based planes. Later on, there was a release in the U.S. on some of the information gotten from these men. It formed the basis of an article ap- pearing in Collier's Maga- zine in three installments in February -and March, 1944, under the title, "War Below Zero." Germans brought here after the elimination of their Greenland bases from July to October, 1944 had — almost without ex- ception — seen copies of the ent that they had profited by the information thus.re- leased, and that the article had made them more wary in talking. Feared U.S. Planes From Iceland. Preparations for the (Continued on Page 3) ScelandiejOaily Prints Views Of Readers On What Is Democracy? The Visir, daily afternoon paper of Beykjavik, last week' published reader response to the question: "What is democracy?" s "As could be expected," explained the editor, "the an- swers vary greatly. Some have replied in complete serious-, ness, others jokingly and many with heavy irony. Allthis depends upon how 'democracy' appears to the individual, how he finds it in action, and how he feels it should be. But whether or not people are satisfied with democracy, as it is in action, or have become disappointed, certain it is that the only way for the nation to live in happiness is to learn the faults involved in democracy and to correct them as well as possible." Appearing below ate from the viewpoint of some Collier's article. It was evid- NEW ENSA SHOW HERE PLAYED TO ALLIED ARMIES ON WESTERN FRONT After giving battlefront performances before Allied troops in France, Belgium and Holland, Hie members of the cast of "Odd Spots" (this month's ENSA show) found the Tripoli Theater a welcome change last Tues- day night when they appear- ed before GIs here. Hitting the beaches of 'Nor- mandy before the fall of Caen, the troupe followed the Allied armies into Fran- ce, Belgium and Holland — seeing and playing before men at such battlegrounds OXFORDS. SILVER IDENTIFICATION BRACELET- PRIZES IN CONTEST TO NAME PX RESTAURANT A, pair of oxfords and a silver indentification bracelet have been announced as first and second prizes, re- spectively, in a Command-wide contest opened this week by Base Special Service. Object of the contest is to find a name for the PX Bestaurant adjacent to Club 14 in Beykjavik. Explaining that some confusion has resulted because of a widespread, although erroneous, tendency to identify the restaurant with Club 14, Maj. Harold M. Shaw, Base PX officer, pointed out that a name is needed which will clearly distinguish the restaurant as an entirely separate facility. Bules of the contest are as follows: (1) Names submitted should be concise, easy to say, and should clearly identify the restaurant as a distinct facility unassociated with the Bed Cross or any other non-military activity. (2) All enlisted men of the Command are eligible to participate, with the exception of personnel of Base Special Service and the PX Bestaurant. Each contestant may submit as many entries as he likes. (3) Entries should be addressed to: EDITOR, THE WHITE FALCON, BASE SPECIAL SERVICE. All entries must have been received at The White Falcon office not later than Monday noon, March 12, 1945. Contest judges wiH be Maj. Harold M. Shaw and Sgt. John.MoEan, White Falcon editor. Forty Percent Of Men En 28 Age Group Are Declared Unfit An announcement from Selective Service Headquart- ers states that more than 40 percent of the men called up in the 28-year-old age group are being rejected as unfit for military duty. The rejection rale goes over the 50 percent mark at age 34 and climbs to 59 per- cent for men of 38, the offi- cials reveal. On an occupational basis, the highest rejection rate has been among men em- ployed in domestic service, with almost 60 percent of the men in this group turn- ed down. Mental ailments and deficiencies lead .the list of causes for rejection. as Nijmegen, Arnhem and Eindhoven. MC Tom West- wood reports that they have appeared before units in fields, barns, ehateaus, mon- asteries and shell-torn theat- ers in small towns. "It was quite an experience to talk to men who saw us perform within ten minutes after coming out of battle," he says. Westwood reports that one afternoon they appear- (Continued on Page 2) some of the letters which were received and printed by the Visir: "Democracy is a group of people who live independent of the power of men or a man and where every indi- vidual acts in accordance with his conscience, without fear of punishment." "Democracy in its pres- ent form is final control by] the least able voters over legislation and mode of gov- ernment." "Democracy is this, that the whole nation elect re- presentatives to handle its affairs, to act on behalf of the nation and that it be pos- (Continued on Page 3) Men and women shown in the above photo are mem- bers of the latest ENSA show to play Iceland^ "Odd Spots." In the rear;, 1 to r, are comedian Jack Dagmax* dancer Rene Kiel and novelty mail Edward Bowers. Seat- ed in front (I to r) are singer Betty Arrel and pianist Joan Pounds. Standing in right foreground is MC Toitt Westwood. <Sig. Corps photo). J

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