The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 17.03.1945, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 17.03.1945, Blaðsíða 2
 g wa_J. 43 5 5 « « g « Shown below are e: pies of Icelandic filagree white at right, a '<fgu GSiiSur" works on brace let links. a Hand-Made Jewelry « Manv wives, sweethearts 5? and mothers of GIs stat- § ioned in Iceland have § been greatly pleased with g the beautiful jewelry sent o from this country— jew- « elry which is the result of >; hours of patient, pain- g staking work. § Goldsmiths here have been plying their trade for hundreds of years and « have developed an artist- ry in silver and gold that « The broad term giill- smiour (goldsmith) is used to cover all types of handicraft associated with the working of silv- er and gold, as the field, in Iceland, is not broad enough to allow for much specialization. Hence, a man must be an expert de- signer; be able to work with all kinds of metals; and serve as an engraver. Gold and silver are im- a "mass production" sy- s\ stem where the same op- g eration is repeated on a g dozen pieces before the fj next step is taken. h « is as unique as itisbeauti- ported from the U.S. and « it •.r I ful. Like all European craftsmen, the goldsmiths of Iceland undergo a four J year apprenticeship be- « fore, they are qualified to SI go out oh their own. In g addition to actual study $ in the shop, the apprentice c studies designing and oth- j? er allied courses at an in- ?f dustrial school. *Many j? students went abroad dur- si ing peacetime years - to g take additional courses in France, Germany and Switzerland. a Great Britain as Iceland does not have these two natural resources. From tiny strands of silver thread, the smiths fashion delicate bracelets, ear rings, broaches and belts. The filagree is noted for the delicacy and work- manship of design. Hours of patient hand-turning and knurling go- into the making of a silver medal or cup. In order to facilitate the filling of an order, the jewelers have worked out Among the finely ex- ecuted items made is the belt which is part of the national costume worn by p Icelandic women upon » festive occasions. Priced g at over 2,500 kronur (ap- « proximately $375),, the Ijj belt is made up of many j; links which contain a rais-r » ed butterfly-type design. « As jewelry-making is a g precise and painstaking a process, it is not unusual 6 to find that it is a craft « w which is quite often pass- g ed down from father to g* son. One Reykjavik gull- smiSur, fop instance, took over from his father 35 8-1 g years ago aifd is still going strong. He' often works from 15 to 19 hours per day as he loves his trade [£ and is proud of his creat- 8 ive artistrv. o j;«ttGGr;a»0;50?i;>C«!S!iOCXJ^S;iOKOa«CK5055»G«!!5Xi5iOO;SOO»»»«00«?50^KKi?i«?» ¦ JWiif^J***. 23 —Deitifos: (Continued from Page 1) who had spent several months in the States, main- ly in the Oakland and Berk- eley area in California; Yil- borg Slefansdotlir, a nurse, who had pursued post-grad- uate studies at a hospital at Wellingford, Conn.; and GuSrun Jonsdottir, a Reykja- vik office worker, who had been attending a business college in New York City. Pjetur Bjornsson, veteran TO SCHOOL IM k B0W10AT Last week the school buses couldn't run at Columbus, Ohio, because of the flooded roads but Marshall Pitt solved the problem by hauling the youngsters in his rowboat (above). captain of the Dettifoss; had remained at home in Reykja- vik this trip, and so Jonas BoSvarsson, first mate, who captained the vessel, was rescued with 18 of his fellow crew members. Icelandic press comment on this most recent of war tragedies affecting the nat- ion stresses the toll which the country has paid to Nazi barbarism in the War so far. The two principal passeng- er vessels sailing to America have been sunk within about three months' time, leaving the country virtually with- out communication with the U.S. The Gullfoss of Jthe. Ice- landic Steamship Co. line was lost to Nazis when seiz- ed while in Copenhagen har- bor at the time of the -invas- ion of Demnark Apr. 9,1910. The. GoSafoss and the Detti- foss have now been sunk. The Icelandic Life Saving ' Societv released figures this (During the temporary absence of Pvt. Jack Gray, this column is being written by Sgt. Bob Hill.) The silhouette strip-tease act was the hit of Club IPs "Rinky Dink County Fair" last Sunday evening. The fel- lows really went for it in a big way.... Our British Allies proved themselves'bigger and better pic-eaters than the Yanks inasmuch as the"y came in first and second, respect- ively, in the pie-eating contest. AC Pat Walsh (RAF) was first and Seaman Jack Whitby (Royal Navy) second. Pvt. Paul Stetler of the AAA came in third.. . .Success of the evening was due mainly to the whole-hearted efforts put forth by Dee Jungers who conceived and stage- managed the affair. Most GIs came from Club 14 with the thought in mind that this was by far the best evening yet provided by the local ARC. Red Cross Commandoes up Club 23 Way Sunday found their breath coming in short pants when Pfc. Sam Mininni (clad in deep purple, out-of-this-world rayon pajamas and lounging robe) walked out on stage with Helen Fauver, who was attired in a terrific, figure-revealing negligee. .... Chuck Walden, Joel Wiant, Bob Wallace, Sam Mari- nelli, Thomas Buffe and John "Red" Hall got a taste of things to come when they modelled civilian clothes— from riding habits to evening suits. Merle Ramseyer of the ARC also pitched in and served as a model. . . .Make- up man Tony Corollo was the man of the evening, though, with the nice job of painting lipstick on all those beautifid girls.... Annabelle Mitchell's preparations for the past month proved well-worth-while when she saw the packed house. S/Sgi. Paul Geden has designed an Easter card which will soon be distributed to the members of this Command. Paul, incidentally, is the artist who's helping to make ATC's "Ski-way Hi Lites" one of the Army's better mimeo- ' graphed newspapers.... Another artist, Pvt. Lewis S. Adair of the Engineers, is attracting attention with the unusual programs he's turning out for Club 23....Sgt. Tony Barra of the Army Band's Dance Orchestra is sing- ing the praises these days of "He's Gone"-^a ballad written by Lt. Leslie Stevens and Cpl. Ralph Manza of the Air Corps.... Speaking of local composers, Sgt. Al Cerunda has written "Poor Without You" (played by the AAF Orchestra) and "You're The Reason Why" (played by the String" Ensemble). A/. ROAMING IN REYKJAVIK: One can't help but notice the blending of the Old and New Worlds when walking _ about the streets, of Iceland's capital. For instance, the modern dresses of the young women stand in sharp con- trast to the long, black, flowing gowns of the national costume worn by the older women. In Iceland, as in so many European countries, Hollywood has had its influence on the younger women as witness the bright colors of the sweaters, their make up and polished finger nails— and the way they walk. . . .The numerous American-made products in the stores bring a touch of Main Street to Laugavegur. In this connection, a well-known brand of soap flakes is packaged especially with Icelandic writing on the box.... GIs are seen flocking daily k> the stores in search of souvenirs to meet that mail call cry of "send something from Iceland." Great favorite at present is the gilt Icelandic coin bracelet. Knitted'goods with their fine needlepoint and unusual design are sure to please the folks back hemie too.... Many of the guys make it a point-to stop in at a bakery and load up with pastries to take back to the hut for bedtime snacks served with tea, coffee, cocoa or cokes. week showing that the coun-'; enormous one in view of the try, with its 125,000 populat-1 country's small population, ion, has lost 408 lives at sea since 1940—249 of themi dir- ectly or indirectly due to en- emy action. The toll is an and this grim .reminder that the war is not over yet, is once more brought home to the Icelandic nation.

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The White Falcon

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