The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 12.03.1976, Blaðsíða 2

The White Falcon - 12.03.1976, Blaðsíða 2
Page 2 ¦¦¦ ' NEWS BRIEFS Shot records REMINDER--Personnel scheduled for transfer from Iceland are reminded of the requirement to update their im- munization records before departure. The desired time frame for doing this is within three months of the depar- ture date. Failure,to update immuni- zation records may result in a delay in transfer. The immunization clinic is open daily, Monday through Friday (except Wednesday) from 2 to 4 p.m. Avoid delay and'update your immunization records today. Auto inspection The following JO-numbered vehicles are due for automobile inspections: Today ............... JO 6745-6850 Monday .............. JO 6851-6901 Tuesday ............. JO 6903-6954 Wednesday ........... JO 6955-7002 Thursday ............ JO 7010-7084 Friday .............. JO 7085-7098 (and stragglers and reinspections on Friday.) G/ Bill The GI Bill Education Program is still alive, awaiting Senate action. The measure passed the House, but the Senate failed to act on the bill be- fore the Christmas recess. Another part of the bill would eliminate the Pre-discharge Education Program (PREP). Since the Senate has taken no action, the PREP Program will continue. The Senate is expected to act on the bill within the next few months and tentatively will cut off the GI Bill Program. The Senate is also expected to go along with the House measure to limit the time period for GI Bill use. The proposed bill would require service members to use their benefits within 12 years from the date of passage of the bill. Now service members must use their education benefits within 10 years following discharge. The bill passed by the House also would give service members nine addi- tional months of education eligibili- ty- Most service members now are eli- gible for only 36 months of educa- tion. Early releases Approximately 3,000 first term airmen serving in surplus specialties will be granted early release, prob- ably in May, under a voluntary sep- aration program currently being de. veloped by the Air Force. Only stateside airmen, and other- wise eligible Alaskan, Hawaiian or U.S. territorial residents serving at the home of record may apply. Imple- mentation details on the program are expected to be available at personnel in about a month. First termers in approximately 100 specialties who are scheduled for June to September 1976 separation will be eligible. White Falcon Navy/AF navigator training combined COMMANDING OFFICER Capt. John R. Farrell PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER JOCS James A. Johnston INFORMATION CHIEF ^Ar OltO JOC Jerry L. Babb EDITOR Fmlffll J02 Jerry L- Foster rsKun STAFF J02 Glenna L. Houston J03 Pat McGreevy White Falcon is published Fridays in accordance with SECNAVINST 5720.44 for distribution to U.S. military personnel, Naval Station, Keflavik, Iceland, and their dependents, and to military and civilian employees of the Iceland Defense Force' and their families. It is printed in the Naval Station Print Shop from appropriated funds in accordance with NAVEXOS P-35. The opinions and statements made herein are not to be construed as official views of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. News items, questions, suggestions, and comments may be submitted by calling 7409 or by visiting AFRTS, bldg. T-44. Navy and Air Force student navigators will start training together at Mather AFB, Calif., in July. Air Force Undergraduate Navigator Training will be expanded July 1 to in- clude Navy Aerial Navigation Training Programs. The consolidated training will save the Department of Defense about $900,000. The Navy programs produce about 160 Navy, 15 Coast Guard and 32 Marine Aerial Navigators annually. No Navy aircraft or equipment will be trans- ferred to Mather. Navy and Coast Guard students will enter the Undergraduate Navigator Train- ing Program during its sixth week and remain for approximately 17 weeks, re- ceiving instruction in avionics and celestial and global navigation. They will spend 85 hours in the T-43 Jet Trainer and 68 hours in the ground-based T-45 Simulator. After their Navigator training course, the Navy students will receive specialized training required for unique Navy missions. The Marine Corps navigator students, all enlisted personnel, will be trained by the Marine Air Navigation School which will move to Mather from Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Tex. About seven Marine warrant officer and en- listed instructors will train Marines, using Air Force equipment and facili- ties. The action is part of the Department of Defense's continuing effort to in- crease the quality and decrease the costs of training through consolidation. The navigator and non-rated candidate backlog is less acute. All 210 naviga- tor-qualified graduates in the backlog can enter undergraduate navigator train- ing by August. There are 268 on the non-rated candi- date waiting list; 26 distinguished graduates among them. Those 26 should enter active duty, consistent with aca- demic discipline and AFROTC enrollment category, ahead of the others. Along with pilot candidates who elect non- rated assignments, all will enter active duty between July and September, by com- missioning date, to fill non-rated va- cancies matching their qualifications. All of the 2,500 cadets programmed to graduate between March and June 1976, who have not yet been commissioned, will be offered the opportunity for active duty or a choice of voluntary contract termination or "Palace Option." Addi- tionally, 43 who have been commissioned and will complete previously granted ed- ucational delays will be offered the same choices. First crack at non-rated vacancies will go to the March to June 1976 dis- tinguished AFROTC graduates. The rest of the non-rated candidates, as well as excess rated candidates vying for non- rated slots, will be brought into the active Air Force, according to qualifi- cations, in order of their date of com- missioning. Even if all of the excess rated candidates accept non-rated jobs, all but a small number can come on board by September 1977, unless there are fur- ther reductions by the Air Force. BUPERS seeks Trident personnel The Bureau of Naval Personnel is looking for applicants to fill the en- listed billets on the blue and gold crews of the lead Trident submarine, as well as for the initial group of in- structors for the Trident Training Fa- cility, Bangor, Wash. About one-half of these billets are expected to be activated in Fiscal Year 1977 with training for some of the in- structors to get underway in late 1976, and for the initial crewmembers to begin early next year. Enlisted personnel interested in as- signment to the Trident program should submit their applications to the Chief of Naval Personnel, attention PERS 513, in accordance with the guidelines listed in BUPERSNOTE 1306 of Jan. 20, 1976. Applicants must meet the general re- quirements of Chapter 12 of the Enlisted Transfer Manual. In addition, all rated or designated applicants for the lead Trident submarine must be qualified in submarines. A minimum of one year at your present duty station, or two years if you are on sea duty, is required. Also, you must have sufficient obligated service to serve at least 18 months on board the ship after it is commissioned, tentatively set for the end of August, 1976. Application date deadlines vary ac- cording to ratings, with some strategic weapons systems Specialist NECs having only until March 31 to get their paper- work into the bureau. But some ratings need not apply until the period between January and June, 1977. Qualified applicants will be identi- fied and officially notified that they have been placed on the Trident volun- teer list. Personnel selected for the crew of the lead submarine will begin their training in early 1977 and will receive submarine pay during their enroute training. GIt'S cYour The Tooth Fairy* says: GHealtti Preventive dentistry helps Within the past few years dental re- searchers have added new techniques to the field of preventive dentistry that can make teeth much more resistant to decay than ever before. Children in particular are reaping great benefits. In case you haven't taken a child to the dentist for a while, you might be surprised to see the doctor painting teeth with a fluoride solution and ap- plying a plastic sealant to the biting surfaces. Both procedures are complete- ly pain-free and, according to extensive studies, both can help teeth fight de- cay. Studies have shown that certain fluo- ride liquids and gels applied directly to the teeth by the dentist can bring about a substantial reduction of dental decay. The reduction can be as much as 30 or 40 per cent — impressive but still not the 60 to 65 per cent that can be achieved by water fluoridation. Dentists particularly recommend the application of fluorides about age three to protect children's primary teeth and again about ages 7, 11 and 13 when per- manent teeth are erupting. The job of the fluoride applications is to help the enamel of the teeth be- come more resistant to decay. The seal- ants, on the other hand, are designed to seal the tiny cracks and pits in the biting surfaces of the teeth so that food and bacteria cannot collect there. One of the first questions asked about pit and fissure sealants is often, "What are pits and fissures and why should they be sealed"? The answer lies with an understanding of how teeth grow. As teeth develop, enamel usually forms smoothly on the surfaces of front teeth. The teeth In the back of the moutn, however, have irregularities on their chewing or "occlusal" surfaces. These irregularities are in the form of tiny indentations and grooves called pits and fissures. They are actually defects in the teeth which are common to normal teeth. The pits and fissures are the sites of much of the dental decay that occurs particularly in children and adoles- cents. The bristles of a toothbrush cannot reach effectively into the minute depressions. A sealant, then, is a material that is applied as a coating to the grinding surfaces to seal off the pits and fis- sures. The product Is sold as a professional product only to dentists. The material is a liquid that is brushed on the grinding surfaces of the teeth. In one procedure, it hardens to a transparent coating under ultra - violet light. A small hand - held ultra-violet lamp is focused on the teeth for less than a minute. The material is not applied to the sides of teeth. Since pit and fissure sealants are designed to coat only the biting sur- faces, they have no value for other areas that are particularly susceptible to decay — for instance, the surface between teeth and near the gumline. The pit and fissure sealants and flu- orides applied in the dental office are not designed as an alternative to regu- lar oral hygiene. Instead, they are in- tended to augment other proven preven- tive practices including brushing with an accepted toothpaste, daily use of dental floss, fluoridation of drinking water and regular professional care. SCHEDULE OF SERVICES PROTESTANT 10 a.m. Main Chapel: Lutheran 2nd & 4th Sundays; 11 a.m. Main Chapel: Divine Worship; 7 p.m. Main Chapel: Evangelistic Service & Fellowship. CATHOLIC 9 a.m. Main Chapel: Mass Sunday; 5:30 p.m. Main Chapel: Mass Sunday; 11:45 a.m. Blessed Sacrament Chapel: Mass Monday through Friday. LAY LEADER Sunday, Latter Day Saints 9:30 a.m.: Chapel Annex; Sunday, Episcopal 10 a.m.: Main Chapel 1st, 3rd & 5th Sundays; Sunday, Church of Christ noon: Chapel Annex; Sunday, Latter. Day Saints 5 p.m.: Lower School;! Sunday, Fundamental Baptist 10 a.m.^: Human Relations Center; Sunday, Fun- damental Baptist 6:30 p.m.: Call 7278/7569; Monday, New Life Fellow- ship 7 p.m.: Chapel Annex, and Thursday, Baha'i 7:30 p.m.: Call 6260. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION PROTESTANT 9:30 a.m. Lower School, Sunday School (Age 3-Adult) and 7 p.m. Main Chapel, Bible Study Wednesday. CATHOLIC Grades 1-8 Monday after school in classrooms. High School Monday 7 p.m. Main Chapel Conference Room. LAY LEADER Latter Day Saints Sunday School at 11:30 a.m.: Lower School; Church of Christ Sunday Bible School 11 a.m.: Chapel Annex; Church of Christ Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.m.: Chapel Annex, and Fundamental Baptist Thurs- day Bible Study 7 p.m.: Chapel Annex. The White Falcon wishes "Farewell and Bless" to the following departing per- sonnel: MS3 Eddie Acenas NAVSTA AKAA Joseph Angle NAVSTA NA '¦'•^m AN Ann Berry CMCA Dixie Blea NA\^H CE3 Phillip Blea NAVsUP LISN Kandy Evans NAVSTA AKAN James Funk NAVSTA SKSN Robert Hickox NAVSTA SK3 Theresa Patrick NAVSTA SKI William Patrick NAVSTA ASE3 Bruce Savor NAVSTA AE1 Robert Slawinski NAVSTA AKAN Kenneth P. Wirth NAVSTA FIFE CORPS MARCHERS count cadence at the NATO lower school during Mardi Gras festivities last week, (photo by PH3 Vic Caffaro)

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