The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 12.03.1976, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 12.03.1976, Blaðsíða 3
'larch 12, 1976 Pane 3 Tanker' - the ultimate firefighting vehicle Story and photos by J02 Terry J. Barnthouse "Space had to be made for the 68- foot monster," said Assistant Fire Chief Haraldur Stefansson as he gazed at the huge yellow machine. "This thing is it for a firefighting vehicle; there's nothing it isn't ready for." As he walked by the new special- ized piece of machinery he added, "We're proud to be one of only ten Naval stations to have such a fire- fighter. It's a 5,000 gallon portable fire hydrant." As two firemen prepared the fire- fighter, nicknamed the "Tanker," for a demonstration, the fire chief explained more about the machine. The tremendous capabilities of the firefighter include foaming runways, ^resupplylng other vehicles, and fur- bishing nozzle and handline support. A rear-mounted package carries 5,000 gallons of water, 300 gallons of AFFF (aqueous film-foaming foam) agent and 500 gallons of protein foam. The agent, when mixed with water, produces a fire-extinguishing foam. It is a noncorrosive, nontoxic chemical which is used to put out liquid fires. One load of foam from the truck covers 50,000 square feet. ^During the demonstration, the slow moving "Tanker" spread a 25-foot-wide blanket of four - inch high foam. In an aircraft emergency the foam blanket would be spread over a required length and width by the 24-foot spreader bar. The size of the foam path is deter- mined by the aircraft's size and slide distance. Because each aircraft is dif- ferent , Keflavik firemen invented a com- puter dial as an aid in figuring the slide distance and the time required to lay the foam. Firemen have been training and fam- iliarizing themselves with the new vehicle for a month. Constant up-keep of the $30,000 machine will mean good service. It is a great expense for safety. Not only is the firefighter for use at the Keflavik International Airport, it is also ready to service building fires throughout the NATO Base. A top-mounted rotating turrent has a discharge capability of 800 gallons per minute to a distance of 240 feet. It also can transfer water to other fire trucks through the use of special adap- tors. The "Tanker" comes from Naval Facil- ity, Norfolk, Va. Such a specialized machine was declared necessary for Kef- lavik based on the airport's number of incoming planes and passengers and quantity of fuel used. Crash and Rescue Truck A new Crash Fire and Rescue Truck has also been added to the line of 44 Fire Department heavy duty vehicles. Rigged up with rescue tools, from wire cutters to an electric saw, the rescue truck is ready for its mission. The four-wheel-drive crash unit has been placed in service after its oper- ators redesigned compartments, covered the rear of the truck and familiarized themselves with the equipment. "There is no way of not finding any piece of equipment," states Crash Captain Ragnar Ragnarsson. "Each piece is outlined to show its place in the compartment." There is a place for everything and everything has its place. The Fire and Rescue Truck is also equipped with two tanks of firefighting agents. One tank carries 100 gallons of a foam-making, water-like mixture. The second holds 150 pounds of dry PKP (potassium bicarbonate powder). Each container is connected to a nitrogen cylinder. To operate the unit, the nitrogen cylinder is opened, forcing the agents through the hose. This combina- tion is effective on fuel fire suffoca- tion. "The equipment works beautifully," says Fire Chief Stefansson. "A fireman knows what he needs and appreciates ¦ the best." Even though the new trucks haven't been to their first fire or rescue, the men who know how to operate them say they are ready. FIREMEN ROBERT 0LAFSS0N and Vilhjamur Arngrimsson, right, demonstrate fire- fighting capabilities of the station's newest fire vehicles. Fireman Robert Olafsson, below, watches the steady flow of foam from the firefighter. Station Library offers voting info, and best sellers by Cathy Mullen Do you know when your home state is having its Presidential Primary or if your state is even holding one? Do you know what state officials are being elected this year? This information is now available at your Station Library on the Voting Information poster located on the second stack from the front desk. Do you have any books which have been checked out by someone who was trans- ferred long ago? The library staff will be glad to get them back regardless of how long ago they were checked out. The Station Library now has a. new Best Seller List as printed in the Pub- lisher's Weekly for February 9, 1976. Those entries marked by an asterisk (*) are not available at the library. FICTION 1. Curtain - Agatha Christie 2. The Choirboys - Joseph Wambaugh 3. Ragtime - E. L. Doctorow * Handball: The international handball match Sun- day between the U.S. Women's Olympic Handball Team and the Icelandic National Women's Team ended in an 11-11 tie. 4. The CreeJe Treasure - Irving Stone 5. Saving the Queen - W.F. Buckley,Jr. 6. In the Beginning - Chaim Potok 7. The Eagle Has Landed - Geo. Higgins 8. Nightwork - Irwin Shaw 9. Looking for Mister Goodbar - Judith Rossner 10. Shogun - James Clawell NON-FICTION 1. Angels - Billy Graham 2. Bring on the Empty Horses - David Niven *3. Winning Through Intimidation - Robert Ringer 4. Doris Day: Her Own Storu - A. E. Hotchner 5. The Relaxation Response - Herbert Benson 6. Sylvia Porter's Money Book - Sylvia Porter *7. My Life - Golda Meir *8. Tennessee Williams: Memoirs - Tennessee Williams 9. Power! How to Get It, How to Use It_ - Michael Korda 10. The Age of Napoleon - Will and Ariel Durant The Station Library has two new books in the McNaughton collection both deal- ing with the CIA, one fiction and one non-fiction: 1. Saving the Queen by William F. Buckley, Jr. is his first novel and is, as of the February 15 New York Times Book Review Section, number five on the Best Seller list for fiction. It is in its second week on the list of the top ten. The novel deals with a young CIA agent who is to find out from whom and where the Russians are getting informa- tion about the United States' creation of a hydrogen bomb in 1951. During his assignment, he finds many surprises in the most unlikely places; he even finds A fast and exciting international game The afternoon's action for the more than 400 spectators at the Base Gym began with music provided by the school band of Ko'pavogur. They also played at half time. The game was rough with plenty of fast action. The first half belonged to the aggressive American team who pushed to an 8-1 lead. Assistant U.S. Coach Elmer Edes said; "We couldn't do anything wrong in the first half, both our offense and defense were really together." The leading scorer for the Americans in the first half, Kith three goals, was April Hunt, a 17-year-old high school senior from Milford, Conn. Sandra Leigh, a high school Phys. Ed. teacher from Pensacola, Fla. and Carol Lindsey both made two goals in the first half. The other first half score was made by Linda Lillis, a senior at Concordia Teachers College from Chicago. Lillis also made two goals in the second half of the game. In the second half, the Icelanders found the key to the American's defense and scored repeatedly to prove it. Many of the second period goals were provided by Erla Surrisdottir, who got the single goal in the first half and five more in the second. One of the Icelander's coaches commented that his team had not been plaving up to their potential at the start of the game but made up for it in the second half. The American team managed to hold the lead in the second half until, with nine minutes left, Halpa Gudmunsdo'ttir scored a goal to make it a 10-10 tie. This was her second goal. Then on a score by Erla Surrisdottir the Icelanders took the lead. Lillis made the final American goal with about three and a half minutes left in the game. Neither team was able to break through the other's defense and it ended with an 11-11 tie. The other scorers for the Icelandic his own life in danger. Mr. Buckley's high style with wit, humor, and bite are on almost every page as well as his intelligence and obvious inside know- ledge of Washington and London. 2. The CIA File, edited by Robert L. Borosage and John Marks, is an intensive and critical analysis of clandestine op- erations of the CIA. The editors have compiled some revealing and extremely pertinent essays concerning CIA covert operations. Some of these operations are: domestic espionage; disastrous involvements in Cuba and Chile; the "secret war" in Laos; and evasion or subversion of congressional review. The editors also include an unprecedented response from former CIA Director Wil- liam Colby. This book replaces the heat of uninformed argument with the light of fact and informed theory. It is a vital book about a very vitally important is- sue. team were; Johanna Halldo'sdo'ttir with two goals and Margaret Brandottir with one. Reita Clanton, a Phys. Ed. teacher from Opelika, Ala., scored the third goal for the U.S. Olympic team in the second half. If you missed this game, you still have two chances to see this fast, ex- citing sport— games will be played tonight at 8:30 in Hafnaf jord'ur, and at 3 tomorrow afternoon in Akranes. Story l>y J02 Glenna Houston. Photos by J03 Pat McGreevy and PH3 Rene1 Pearce

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The White Falcon

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