The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 30.04.1976, Blaðsíða 3

The White Falcon - 30.04.1976, Blaðsíða 3
April 30, 1976 Page ; Six Service Members of the Quarter honored Tuesday "I've done a lot of skiing and goose hunting, —Being in a squadron that is busy is enjoyable, —I don't care for the weather too much, —Shift work makes it hard to take college courses, but if you really want to go, you'll find a way to do it." These are quotes from the six re- cently selected Service Members of the Quarter when asked about being, stationed in Iceland. The five men and one woman were honored Tuesday in the office of Rear Admiral Harold G. Rich, Commander Ice- land Defense Force. They are: Staff Sergeant Daniel Atkins, Marine NCO of the Quarter; Lance Corporal Guy Pelletier, Marine of the Quarter; Technical Sergeant Howard Saxon, Air Force NCO of the Quarter; Airman First Class Winfred Dancy, Airman of the Quarter; ASM2 Jerome Paul, Petty Officer of the Quarter; and CTASN Diane Williams, Sailor of the Quarter. Each received a letter of commenda- tion, a plaque in the shape of Iceland, and a priority III on the station En- vironmental and Morale flight. Sgt. Atkins, who works at the Marine Correctional Center, says, "It's hard to sit long duty hours in the dark at night and watch the prisoners. This is a new job for me—it's a challenge. Each case here is different; guys are in here for different reasons. For some, the cor- rection doesn't take too long, and for others the process is more complicated. Handling prisoners' requests and TSGT. SAXON, Air Force NCO of the Quarter, relays a message with F-4 pilots as part of his job with the 57th Ughter Interceptor Squadron. keeping their records are my main func- tions during the day. Since my ten months in Iceland, I've traveled to several places in the country. I feel there should be more programs to get people off the base and meet Iceland- ers ." He feels one can get a better look at the Icelandic culture when getting out and traveling. For LCpl Pelletier, a native of Con- necticut, the educational opportunities available to him while in the service are helping him obtain a college degree. "Even with the tight schedule and shift work, I'm enrolled in two college courses. Of course, I don't make all the classes, but I feel if a person is really interested in the subjects, he'll find a way to complete them. It's all up to the individual to get the educa- tion that he wants." , "Guard duty gets boring, but you learn to like it," says Pelletier. Traveling around the country and to Europe has been enjoyable for TSgt. Saxon. "My family and I have gone to Germany and we traveled to different places here in Iceland. I had a good friend fill me in when I got orders for up here. I'd advise anyone coming up here to bring a four-wheel drive vehicle and get out and see the countryside." The aircraft technician, who has beer stationed here for two years with th« 57th FIS, is furthering his education b\ attending night classes with the Uni- versity of Maryland. A1C Dancy, a weapons mechanic hailing- from North Dakota, has been here onlv since February. "I moan and groan, but I really don't mind being here. The weather at home is sometimes worse than here." "I had to cancel my school courses because of shift work, but most of my off-time is spent at the gym working out and playing basketball." ASM2 Jerome Paul, assigned to VP-5, does more than his rate requires, ac- cording to his supervisors. "As an aviation support equipment technician, I service, test, maintain and repair aviation support equipment. This gear has to be inspected daily. My other jobs include: career counselor, lineman and gasoline and diesel mechanic." He modestly admits that the retention in the shop that he supervises is the highest in the squadron. "I like working here in Iceland be- cause there is a lot to do. In my shop- we work 12 hours on, 12 hours off, seven days a week; so there isn't too much time on my hands. But, I do hope to see some of the country and the capital while here. As for the base, the faci- lities here beat those that I've seen at other overseas commands," says petty of- ficer Paul, who was honored as the 1975 Sailor of the Year in VP-5. "I'm not sure if I like my work well enough to stay in the Navy for a ca- reer," says CTASN Diane (Wilson) Wil- liams, who was recently selected as Ice- AIC DANCY, Airman of the Quarter, inspects an air-to-air conventional missle. SAILOR OF THE QUARTER CTASN Diane Wil- liams prepares material to be sent to NSGA newcomers. land Defense Force Sailor of the Quar- ter. She continues, "So far my detailer has really been good to me in getting orders to the same place as my husband and it is pretty important to us to be stationed together, even though we work in different divisions and shifts." Diane and her husband, RM2 Norman ''illiams, have been stationed in Iceland 'or eight months. She says, "We met in ipain and had to live off-base there, :oo. We go through more paperwork here, LCPL. PELLETIER, Marine of the Quarter, waves a person by the sentry post which he is guarding. but we really like the place where we live," adding, "It's hard to get time off together to do much traveling." About her work at Naval Security Group Activity, the native of New Jersey states, "Running the mail desk, the guard mail, and the sponsorship program keeps me busy. It's a different job ad- ministratively than that in Rota." Story by J02 Terry B by PH3 Rene' Pearce trnthouse and photos SGT. ATKINS, Marine NCO of the Quarter, answers a phone call while on duty at the Marine Correctional Center. ASM2 PAUL, Petty Officer of the Quarter, readies a piece of support equipment from the VP-5 squadron.

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The White Falcon

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