The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 16.09.1977, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 16.09.1977, Blaðsíða 1
"-V. WhiteJ^Fakon Volume 33 Number 37 Keflavik. Iceland September 16, 1977 WITH THEIR BOAT-LIKE gondola afloat at the "Five Finger Area," a crewman of the helium-filled balloon, "Double Eagle," is plucked to safety from an Icelandic fjord by a Det. 14 HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant." The rescue, which took place Monday, involved crews from a Patrol Squadron P-3C "Orion" and a Det. 14 rC-130 "fercules" tanker. (U.S. Air Force Photo) Fire Department inspectors seek out risk, safety hazards Fire hazard inspection in base housing units continues into the second week. Naval Station Fire Department in- spectors are seeking out fire and safety hazards in family quarters. One of the main items included in the fire inspection is planning a home escape route—should main exits be blocked in case of fire. To aid families in planning an escape route, fire inspectors will out- line with each family an alternate plan to exit from the home during Exit Drill in the Home (Operation "EDITH"), slated at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 14. The fire inspection schedule for Mon- day through Sept. 23 follows: Monday—9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Bldg. 672; 1 to 3 p.m. Bldg. 926-1 and 3 to 6 p.m. Bldg. 3005, 3006, 3007, 2310, 2495, 2496 and 2497. Tuesday—9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Bldg. 926-2; 1 to 3 p.m. Bldg. 927-1 and 3 to 6 p.m. Bldg. 928-1 and 927-2. Wednesday—9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Bldg. 928-2; 1 to 3 p.m. Bldg. 929-1 and 3 to 6 p.m. Bldg. 929-2 and 930-1. Thursday—9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Bldg. 950-2; 1 to 3 p.m. Bldg. 950-3 and 950-4 and 3 to 6 p.m. Bldg. 951-1 and 950-2. A responsible family member should be present during accompany the fire inspectors. A FIRE ALARM TEST—is conducted by Naval Station Fireman Gudnunur Gunnarsson. lie conducts the test op alarms in the base housing units by igniting a piece of cotton and holding it near the alarm. 'Jolly Green Giant' rescues two men in transatlantic crossing Three Keflavik flight crews fought a building weather front, a 2,000-foot ceiling and heavy winds to aid in the search and rescue of two Americans who attempted a transatlantic crossing in a balloon Monday. Members of Patrol Squadron 24 and De- tachment 14, 39th Aerospace Recovery and Rescue Wing, spent nearly 14 hours in flight to find, track and rescue the men Monday. Ben Abruzzo, 47, and Maxie Anderson, 43, of Albuquerque, NM, ran into the de- veloping storm center of a low pressure area when their helium-filled balloon, "Double Eagle," began icing over. The balloon was then forced to a 300-foot altitude at the southern tip of Green- land. With all other radio equipment flooded out, the men used a sealed automatic transmitter to relay the first 3 a.m. distress call to Iceland. Since no lighting conditions existed on the balloon, the patrol squadron search crew was delayed from takeoff un- til dawn. By 9:30 a.m., however, the P-3C "Orion" had reached the balloon- ists, who were at 9,500 feet—330 miles west southwest of Iceland. The plane was in continual radio and visual con- tact with the men. An HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant" and an HC-130 "Hercules" tanker reached the scene about noon. Crewmen fought a low weather ceiling and an overcast weather front to reach the balloonists, who were 40 miles from the northwest corner of Iceland by 3:13 p.m. The balloon went down in water at 5:03 p.m. at the mouth of Isafjordur in the "Five Finger Area," 160 miles north of Keflavik. The men were pulled from their gondola and were in the helicopter by 5:30. They were then transported to Reykjavik. Combined Federal Campaign overseas Tuesday-slated for twelfth year Fall brings the world series, foot- ball and the annual Combined Federal Campaign Overseas Area. The twelfth CFCOA will begin Tuesday at the NATO base. This year, according to Lieutenant Colonel James S. Godwin, project offi- cier, the drive will enable 13 Inter- national Service Agencies, the American National Red Cross and 16 National Health Agencies to serve people at home and around the world. The campaign finances relief and other projects for people the world over, through ISA agencies. It pro- vides funds for the multi-service emergency-oriented Red Cross. It sup- ports health programs which combat disease and crippling disabilities through medical research, patient care and rehabilitation. Stressing the agencies' personal approach to assistance, the upcoming campaign carries the slogan, "Make Someone Happy Through Your CFC." Gifts may be made through payroll allotment or by direct contributions. Through the payroll allotment plan, donations may be spread over a 12-month period, beginning Jan. 1, 1978. If de- sired, one or more agencies may be designated at donation time. Total participation is the primary goal, according to LCol Godwin. Key persons in each unit have been designated as CFC leaders, and will provide additional information about participating agencies and campaign details. The drive on the NATO base will run from Tuesday to Oct. 31. Air Force to exhibit 30th birthday The United States Air Force will be 30-years-old this month. Air Force per- sonnel in Iceland will celebrate the event with an exhibit which promises to be fun for all who attend. The celebration, which is sponsored by the Air Force Junior Officers' Coun- cil and the Enlisted Advisory Council, will take place tomorrow at Hangar 830 from 2 to 4 p.m. The public is invited. A cake-cutting ceremony will begin at 3 p.m. Aircraft will be on display, including an F-4C, EC-121 and an HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant" rescue helicopter. Pilots and crewmen will be on hand to talk with visitors. In addition to the aircraft displays, an AIM-9E Sidewinder missile and an AIM 7E-3 Sparrow missile will be exhibited. Visitors will also be able to see J79 and J33 Turbo jet engines. Movies, slides and other audio visual exhibits will be offered for visitors of all ages. There will be plenty of parking space. The area adjacent to Hangar 830 will ac- commodate 200 vehicles, and the ramp area east of Hangar 885 near the water tower will be an overflow parking area. Happy Birthday Air Force Reflective tape needed for winter Summer is ending and it's time to bring out the warm clothing and heavy coats. But, before you start out the winter, make sure that you and your de- pendents have reflective tape sewn on the edges and backs of outer garments. Visibility will be sometimes poor for NATO base motorists, especially when only a few hours of daylight exist. AIMD will be doing this job Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for departments only by appointments, PRC Roger L. McGinnis, aircrew survival equipment shop chief, said. For those individuals who are not part of a department, meaning dependents and non-school-age dependents, the Rec- reation Department will handle your coats from Monday through Friday from 9 to 4:30 p.m. without an appointment. Just bring your coats in between these hours and you will be ready for the darkness. Contact Chief Floyd C. Fesler at the Recreation Department at 4393/ 7500 for further information.

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