The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 11.06.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 11.06.1965, Blaðsíða 1
AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITES U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 22 Friday, June 11, 1965 FLAG RAISING—Holding reveille at 8 a.m. every morning the three flags (from left to right) of the United States, Iceland and NATO prepare to be hoi sted up. On June 14, 1965 a special day, Flag Day, will be set aside by the people of the United States to ho nor the world-renowned Stars and Stripes. Americans To Observe Flag Day, June 14 To Recall Our "Stars And Stripes'' Heritage June 14 is a special day set aside to honor the world-renowned Stars and Stripes by the people of the United States. Americans, particularly those in the Armed Forces, take a great pride in their country and in their flag. Nearly everyone knows the legend about Betsy Ross. At one time or another, almost all have taken part in a reveille or retreat ceremony and watched with pride as the color was raised or lowered. But how many know where the eight sites in the United States are that the Stars and Stripes are continuously flown*** in honor of brave men and their deeds? Flag Sites The sites—four by tradition and four by presidential proclama- tion—are: The grave of Francis Scott Key; the War Memorial in Worchester, Mass.; the plaza in Taos, N.M.; a civilian cemetery in Deadwood, S.D.; Ft. McHenry, Md.; Flaghouse Square, Balti- more, Md.; the Capital in Wash- ington D.C.; and the Marine Corps Memorial in Arlington, Va. New Flag Design Many colonial flags led up to the designing and adoption of the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777. This flag consisted of 13 stars on a blue field and 13 red and white stripes, the number 13 being symbolic of the 13 colonies. Reasonable Size In 1794, Congress voted to add two stars and stripes for the new states of Vermont and Kentucky. By 1818, the Union had grown to include 20 states and at the sug- gestion of Captain Samuel C. Reid, USN, Congress voted to keep the original design of the flag intact and to keep it at a reasonable size. A law adopted on April 4, 1818, requires that a star be added for each new State on Military Housing For Families Still Poses An Urgent Problem The Department of Defense must build more family housing even though it prefers to rely on available com- munity facilities, according to Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Family Housing) John J. Reed. This distinction is important, he said, citing "urgent" housing needs and mentioning DOD's responsibility to ^adequately house families through1^ whatever reasonable means are available. An attempt is made to utilize the community to the greatest ex- tent possible, Mr. Reed said, but this support is restricted through requirements for personnel to live on base under certain conditions, the remoteness of some installa- tions and existence of certain hardship areas due to high rental costs or sub-standard facilities. "It is these exceptions which cause us to have a sizeable annual new housing construction prob- lem," Mr. Reed said. The Defense Department does not consider "for sale" housing as a solution to the servicemen's needs. It was noted that service personnel are subject to reassign- ment every two or three years and should not have to assume home ownership risks. Should a serviceman purchase a house however, DOD classifies the individual as being adequately housed. (AFPS) the 14th of July after its admis- sion, but that the 13 stripes re- main unchanged. 15 Stars And Stripes The flag, which inspired Franc- is Scott Key to write the Star Spangled Banner, the first verse of which was adopted as our Nati- onal Anthem, had 15 stars and 15 stripes. As of now the Nati- onal Ensign consists of 13 stripes and 50 stars. Stars From Heaven When the Stars and Stripes was first flown by the Continental Army, it was reportedly described by General Washington as fol- lows: "We take the stars from heaven, the red from our mother country, separating it by white stripes, thus showing that we have separated from her, and the white stripes shall go down to posterity, representling liberty". Born Amid Strife Thus the Stars and Stripes came into being—born amid strife of battle to become the standard around which free people rallied to establish our nation. Famous Sentence In 1892, Francis Bellamy wrote a sentence which has become one of the most sincere pledges of homage in the world. Many may not have recited its words since grammar school days. Now, being older, its words have a deep mean- ing that can be well understood. That sentence, as later amended is: "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation (under God), indivisible, with liberty and just- ice for all." Dentist Brings Relief To Icebreaker Crew Lt. William C. Amos, DC, USN, of the Naval Station Dental Clinic has been awarded a letter of commendation from Rear Admiral Ralph Weymouth, Commander Iceland Defense Force. The Doctor was cited for providing "outstanding" dental service for crew members of the icebreaker Edisto (AGB-2) in the Norwegian Sea last month while the ship was engaged in the evacuation of1?'' Navymen scientists and Navymen from Arlis II, Iceland. The commendation read, in part: "This (evacuation of Arlis II) involved a long period at sea und- er arduous circumstances in an ice field with usual accompany- ing storms. It is understood from the Commanding Officer (of the Edisto) that you worked many long hours performing this ser- vice discontinuing your work only when sea conditions precluded operations .... Outstanding Performance "As you know the primary mission of the shore establishment is support to the fleet. This out- standing performance of duty on your part on a voluntary basis in support of this mission is con- sidered to warrant special recog- nition and 'Well Done'." Doctor Amos spent three weeks at sea aboard the Edisto. He said that a dental unit was aboard the ship when he arrived but there were no dentists. Working Hours While aboard ship, he worked regular working hours and even- ings "when work came up, weath- er permitting." He said his best working time was when the Edisto was trapped in. an ice pack for four days. He said the skipper of the Edisto told him it was the thickest ice pack he had seen in 27 years of naval service. Ship's Party While the Edisto was locked in the ice pack, said the Doctor, crew members threw a ship's party on the ice. They whipped up some "Polar Punch" — a concoction of grape juice and ethyl alcohol — and downed it in record time. Old- timers claim that after a few whiffs of this, a man stands as tall as a polar bear. Crew members also played vol- leyball, baseball, football and even took to tobogganing it with sick bay stretchers. Months At Sea It was a successful ship's party, said Doctor Amos, and helped fight off falling morale. The Ed- isto had spent four continuous months at sea before coming into port for five days to load stores, then back out to sea again for two more months. Doctor Amos said that the Edisto provided him with his first taste of sea duty, that he "thoroughly enjoyed" his brief stint aboard the icebreaker. He said he had made two un- succesful attempts to get sea duty. In This Issue World's Fair Accommo- dations ............ PG 3 Movie Guide .......... PG 4 Raymond Burr In Viet Nam ............... PG 5 High School Graduation PG 6 Sports ................ PG 7 Radio—TV Guide...... PG 8 CITED FOR SERVICE—Lt. William C. Amos, DC, USN, receives congratulations and a letter of commendation from Capt Charles W. Miller, DC, USN, dental officer for the Naval Station. Doctor Amos was commended by Commander Iceland Defense Force for rendering "outstanding" dental service to crew members of the ice- breaker Edisto (AGB-2).

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