The White Falcon


The White Falcon - 01.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1

The White Falcon - 01.10.1965, Blaðsíða 1
Fire Prevention Week Runs Oct. 3 To Oct. 9 Fire Prevention is a year round job, and one week of the year is set aside by the Presidential Pro- clamation to drive home the im- portance of fire safety. The Naval Station Fire Department will ob- serve Fire ^Prevention Week, Oct. 3 through Oct. 9. During the week signs and posters will be displayed through- out the Naval Station and fire ex- tinguisher-displays will be on ex- hibit in prominent locations. The school children have been invited to visit the Fire Department where they will get the chance of riding in the Fire Trucks. Seven Days A Week The Fire Division consists of 40 Icelandic Nationals and 26 military personnel who operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It is an integral part of the Sec- urity Department under the non- technical administration of LCdr Charles C. Gregory. All operations of the Fire Di- vision are under the technical supervision of Fire Chief Sveinn Eiriksson, an experienced 14-year veteran in the fire-fighting and fire prevention field. A three- platoon system is in effect, led by assistant chiefs, each of whom possesses many years of practicaj fire experience. Three inspectors are responsible for locating fire hazards and for recommending and advising ways and means of eliminating such hazards. The care and maintenance of fire ex- tinguishers and testing of alarm systems on station are also import- ant functions. Serves Local Towns Though the department is pri- marily concerned with fire pro- tection of the Naval Station, it occasionally assists local com- munities. The department has answered calls in Keflavik, Grinda- vik, Sandgerdi and surrounding areas. Over the last six months the Fire Department has answered on the average of up to 117 air- craft alarms per month and 18 structural alarms per month. "Let us all remember, that Fire Prevention concerns us all," says Chief Eiriksson. "The mission is too great to be effected by the efforts of your fire protecting ser- vants alone. It requires the com- bined efforts of all. Permitting the accumulation of combustable trash in hidden spaces, the im- proper storage of flammable and explosive liquids, the presence and use of deteriorated electrical wir- ing and appliances, open viola- tion of, or nonconformity to fire- safety rules and regulations laid down for everyone's protection, or permitting hazardous materials to be handled or played with by the children are only a few helpful suggestions toward attaining a fire-free life for which we should all aspire." What To Do This year Chief Eiriksson asks everyone to do his part during the Fire Prevention Week, and to those who like to smoke in bed, here are a few tips from the chief: "Be sure to leave a copy of your last will and testament and list of nearest relatives with the com- manding officer or billeting offi- cer. Check your insurance policies and make sure premiums are paid up. Inform the commanding offi- cer or billeting officer where to send your remains. Advise other occupants that you intend to en- danger their lives. Leave deposit sufficient to cover all personal liability and property damage. In short. Don't smoke in bed!" It is the fervent hope of your Fire Department, that all remem- ber and apply the simple rules of fire protection, that we enjoy the blessing of life, so easily and quickly to be destroyed by un- wanted and destructive fire," con- cluded the fire chief. AFWL's Eighth Ranked Sea Service Newspaper - 1964 THE WHITE ? sJLcb cnartL. U.S. NAVAL STATION, KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, ICELAND Volume IV, Number 36 Friday, October 1, 1965 Cdr Johnson Takes Reins, OinC, Dei. 13 Cdr Ian J. Johnson relieved Cdr John W. Orrill as officer-in-charge (OinC) of Patrol Squadron Twenty-One, Detachment Thir- teen, (VP-21, Det. 13) Sept. 15. The former OinC of VP-21, Commander Orrill became the commanding officer of the squa- dron in ceremonies held Sept. 25 at U.S. Naval Station, Rota, Spain. Commander Johnson's previous assignment was as operations and later executive officer with VP-30, from 1963 to September 1965. Graduate Of Cornell After graduating from Cornell University in, 1950 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Government, the Commander who was commission- ed an ensign through the NROTC program, immediately began his active duty. (Continued on page 8.) NEW OINC AT VP-21 — Taking over the officer-in-charge post at VP-21, Det. 13, last Sept. 15, was Cdr Ian J. Johnson, Former OINC of VP-21, Cdr John W. Orrill, be- came the commanding officer of VP-21 in ceremonies conducted Sept. 25, at U.S. Naval Station, Rota, Spain. FOR HEROISM—Lt.Col. Joe H. Joiner, commandant of the 57th FIS, pins the nation's ninth-ranked decoration, the Airman's Medal, on SSgt. Domingo O. Opio at ceremonies held at the 57th FIS's Hqtrs., Sept. 28. Sergeant Opio was awarded the medal for valor performed, Aug. 21, 1964, when he prevented a dangerous accident while stationed with the 72nd SAC Bomb Wing at Ramey, AFB, Puerto Rico. Opio Decorated For Heroism; Receives "Airman's MedaP' SSgt. Domingo 0. Opio was awarded the nation's ninth highest decoration, the Airman's Medal for Heroism, in ceremonies held Sept. 28 at the 57th Fighter-Interceptor Squadrons' Hqtrs., Bldg. 827. Lt.Col. Joe H. Joiner, commandant of the 57th FIS, presented the sergeant with the^ medal. The decoration for valor was given to Sergeant Opio for the deed he performed, Aug. 21, 1964, while stationed with the 72nd SAC Bomb Wing at Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico. At that time, he was attached to the Munitions Ser- vices Branch of the 21st Munitions Maintenance Squadron (MMS). Risks Life To Save Plane "On that date," the certificate stated, "Sergeant Opio was a member of a Weapons Loading Team. The brakes of a trailer heavily loaded with explosive wea- pons failed as it was being guided down a ramp to a nearby air- craft." Although a collision appeared unavoidable and probably would have resulted in an explosion and a conflagration, Sergeant Opio unhesitantly stayed with the tra- iler and assisted in steering it bet- ween the aircraft fuselage (B- 52G) and a missle mounted on the wing." The commendation letter went on to say, "By his courageous and timely action Sergeant Opio has reflected great credit upon him- self and the United States Air Force." Manually Moves Trailer The sergeant added that he and the four other men in his team (Continued on page 10.) Lt. Col. Hines Here; "CO"Marine Barraeks Lt. Col. Cloyd V. Hines took over as Commanding Of- ficer, Marine Barracks, Keflavik, Iceland in ceremonies held this morning on the Naval Station. Colonel Hines comes from Schools Demonstration Troops, Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Va., where he was exe- cutive officer. Born May 28, 1917, at Chillicothe, Ohio, Colonel Hines graduated from Chillicothe High^ School in 1935. Became 2nd Lt. He entered the Marine Corps in January 1942 and served as an enlisted man until Jan. 1944, when he was commissioned a Mar- ine second lieutenant. During World War II, he parti- cipated in the Guadalcanal and Saipan-Tinian campaigns, and was a member of the initial occ- upation forces of the Japanese homeland in 1945. Returning to the states in 1946, he served with Marine Barracks, Eighth and First Sts., Washington, D.C., until 1948 when he was as- signed to the Marine Detachment, London, England as executive officer. From 1950 until 1952 he served with the 2nd Marine Div- ision, Camp Lejeune, N.C. as ass- istant adjutant, division adjutant and aide to the 2nd Marine Div- ision Commanding General. San Francisco And Korea In 1952, he left Camp Lejeune for duty with the Department of Pacific, San Francisco, Calif., where he was aide to the comm- anding general. He departed there in 1953 for duty with the 3d Marine Div- ision in Okinawa and the 1st Mar- ine Division in Korea, where he remained until 1954. In 1954 he reported to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Va., where he was an instructor with the Basic School until 1956, when he received orders to Headquart- ers, Fleet Marine Force, Norfolk, Va., and duty as aide to the comm- anding general there. Back To Quantico He remained at Norfolk until 1958, when he became aide to the commanding general, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif. In 1960 he returned to Marine Corps Schools where he was student at the Senior School. He graduated from that course in 1961. He then became battalion commander of the 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Division, Camp Pen- dleton until his last assignment. Colonel Hines' medals and dec- orations include the Silver Star Medal; Purple Heart Medal; Presidential Unit Citation; Good Conduct Medal; American Defense Service Medal; American Camp- aign Medal; Asiatic-Pacifc Camp- aign Medal with four stars; World War II Victory Medal; Navy Occ- upation Service Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Korean Service Medal and the United Nations Service Medal. Lt. Col. Cloyd V. Hines

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