Archaeologia Islandica - 01.01.2005, Blaðsíða 106

Archaeologia Islandica - 01.01.2005, Blaðsíða 106
Birna Lárusdóttir, Gavin Lucas, Lilia Biörk Pálsdóttir and Stefán Ólafsson Figure 1. Aerial view of Kúvíkur from Loftmyndir ehf. archaeological survey in the area have shown that nearly all such strips of low- land have been used or cultivated in one way or another and almost, without exception have some structures associat- ed with them, sometimes remains of farms or shielings (Lárusdóttir et al. 2005). Therefore, it is unlikely that structures belonging to the trading center were the first to be built on the site although today no obvious older struc- turés are visible on the surface. It has been proposed that some trading took place there before the monopoly, when English, Dutch and German sailors sailed to Icelandic fishing grounds (Líndal 1982, 378). During the Danish monopoly it was a custom that merchants sailed to trading centers each year and stayed there for only a few days each time. It is therefore unlikely that Kúvíkur had per- manent buildings during this era. The river that runs just west of the site is called Búðará (Booth River), an indica- tion of possible booths or tents. After the monopoly was lifted in 1787 a merchant settled permanently on site and took care of the trading as well as running a farm. Kúvíkur was inhabited throughout the 19th century and still growing in the beginning of the 20th century. A board- ing school was run there one winter and a slaughterhouse for a while but these developments toward the formation of a little village started to decline, especially after a herring factory was built in Djúpavík, some 3-4 km west of Kúvíkur in 1917. The settlement in Kúvíkur came to an end in 1949. Shark liver oil was the main merchandise Kúvíkur had to offer. The ports that were established in 1602 were classified into two main types, depending on the main goods in each place: Fish ports and meat ports. Kúvíkur was the only one classifíed as a liver oil port in the whole of Iceland. Liver oil was a sought-after product in Europe, mainly used for lighting in the ever expanding 104
Blaðsíða 1
Blaðsíða 2
Blaðsíða 3
Blaðsíða 4
Blaðsíða 5
Blaðsíða 6
Blaðsíða 7
Blaðsíða 8
Blaðsíða 9
Blaðsíða 10
Blaðsíða 11
Blaðsíða 12
Blaðsíða 13
Blaðsíða 14
Blaðsíða 15
Blaðsíða 16
Blaðsíða 17
Blaðsíða 18
Blaðsíða 19
Blaðsíða 20
Blaðsíða 21
Blaðsíða 22
Blaðsíða 23
Blaðsíða 24
Blaðsíða 25
Blaðsíða 26
Blaðsíða 27
Blaðsíða 28
Blaðsíða 29
Blaðsíða 30
Blaðsíða 31
Blaðsíða 32
Blaðsíða 33
Blaðsíða 34
Blaðsíða 35
Blaðsíða 36
Blaðsíða 37
Blaðsíða 38
Blaðsíða 39
Blaðsíða 40
Blaðsíða 41
Blaðsíða 42
Blaðsíða 43
Blaðsíða 44
Blaðsíða 45
Blaðsíða 46
Blaðsíða 47
Blaðsíða 48
Blaðsíða 49
Blaðsíða 50
Blaðsíða 51
Blaðsíða 52
Blaðsíða 53
Blaðsíða 54
Blaðsíða 55
Blaðsíða 56
Blaðsíða 57
Blaðsíða 58
Blaðsíða 59
Blaðsíða 60
Blaðsíða 61
Blaðsíða 62
Blaðsíða 63
Blaðsíða 64
Blaðsíða 65
Blaðsíða 66
Blaðsíða 67
Blaðsíða 68
Blaðsíða 69
Blaðsíða 70
Blaðsíða 71
Blaðsíða 72
Blaðsíða 73
Blaðsíða 74
Blaðsíða 75
Blaðsíða 76
Blaðsíða 77
Blaðsíða 78
Blaðsíða 79
Blaðsíða 80
Blaðsíða 81
Blaðsíða 82
Blaðsíða 83
Blaðsíða 84
Blaðsíða 85
Blaðsíða 86
Blaðsíða 87
Blaðsíða 88
Blaðsíða 89
Blaðsíða 90
Blaðsíða 91
Blaðsíða 92
Blaðsíða 93
Blaðsíða 94
Blaðsíða 95
Blaðsíða 96
Blaðsíða 97
Blaðsíða 98
Blaðsíða 99
Blaðsíða 100
Blaðsíða 101
Blaðsíða 102
Blaðsíða 103
Blaðsíða 104
Blaðsíða 105
Blaðsíða 106
Blaðsíða 107
Blaðsíða 108
Blaðsíða 109
Blaðsíða 110
Blaðsíða 111
Blaðsíða 112
Blaðsíða 113
Blaðsíða 114
Blaðsíða 115
Blaðsíða 116
Blaðsíða 117
Blaðsíða 118
Blaðsíða 119
Blaðsíða 120
Blaðsíða 121
Blaðsíða 122
Blaðsíða 123
Blaðsíða 124
Blaðsíða 125
Blaðsíða 126

x

Archaeologia Islandica

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: Archaeologia Islandica
https://timarit.is/publication/1160

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.