Helga Law Journal - 01.01.2021, Blaðsíða 66

Helga Law Journal - 01.01.2021, Blaðsíða 66
Helga Law Journal Vol. 1, 2021 68 Dr. Snjólaug Árnadóttir 69 declaration of a State […] the other State or States concerned may incur obligations in relation to such a unilateral declaration to the extent that they clearly accepted such a declaration’. States generally have a legal interest in making sure that maritime limits of other States satisfy the requirements of UNCLOS. Even if they have no overlapping claims to maritime zones, they may have legitimate interests relating to claims encroaching upon the high seas or the international seabed area.97 On the other hand, it is in the interest of coastal States to push their maritime limits seaward and some States have gone to great lengths to further their maritime entitlements. For example, ‘almost all of the States of the Asia-Pacific region have adopted straight baseline systems that are inconsistent with international law’ and they maintain these claims despite vigorous opposition.98 The ILA Baselines Committee identified 82 protests or objections to straight baselines. These challenges have been submitted by 21 States and the EU and lodged against 39 States, covering almost 50% of all straight baseline claims.99 The United States has actively objected to the unlawful use of baselines worldwide and other States have made similar efforts.100 These objections can prevent acquiescence because, if successfully challenged, unlawful maritime limits become invalid vis-à-vis other States.101 If States fail to challenge excessive maritime limits, they may later be estopped from challenging such limits. As explained by Churchill and Lowe: Where a baseline is clearly contrary to international law, it will not be valid, certainly in respect of States which have objected to it, though a State which has accepted the baseline (for example in a boundary treaty) might be stopped from later denying its validity. In border-line cases— for example, where there is doubt as to whether a State’s straight baseline system conforms to all the criteria laid down in customary and conventional law—the attitude of other States in acquiescing in or objecting to the baseline is likely to prove crucial in determining its validity.102 The submission of charts, or lists of geographic coordinates, to the UNSG is crucial for the formation of acquiescence and estoppel because it provides States with the information necessary to raise their objections. The ICJ has indicated that challenges should generally be raised shortly after submission of data to the 97 See, e.g., Chagos Marine Protected Area (Mauritius v United Kingdom) (2015) XXXI RIAA 359, para 153; Anglo-Norwegian Fisheries (n 35) 125. 98 Ashley Roach and Robert W Smith (n 57) 66. 99 ILA Baselines Committee, ‘Johannesburg Conference’ (ILA 2016) 17, para 65. 100 Ashley Roach and Robert W Smith (n 57) 48. 101 See, e.g., South China Sea (n 7) paras 278 and 1203 B.(2). 102 Robin R Churchill and Alan V Lowe, The Law of the Sea, 2nd revised edition (Manchester University Press 1988) 46-47. The ILC has published ‘Guiding Principles applicable to unilateral declarations of States capable of creating legal obligations’.87 The principles deal with declarations ‘formulated by States in exercise of their freedom to act on the international plane’ and not on ‘unilateral acts […] formulated in the framework and on the basis of an express authorization under international law’.88 Thus, the principles are not directly applicable to maritime limits established in accordance with UNCLOS but the ILC’s commentary and preparatory work is of relevance for this discussion, particularly to limits that become inconsistent with the law due to environmental changes. According to Guiding Principle 3, the legal effects of unilateral declarations depend inter alia on the reactions they invoke.89 When preparing this Guiding Principle, the ILC referenced the 1945 Truman proclamation,90 whereby the United States established unilateral limits to the continental shelf. This occurred before the conclusion of a framework treaty (UNCLOS and the Convention on the Continental Shelf).91 Yet, the declaration soon became opposable because of the positive reactions it received from other States.92 As noted by the ICJ, the Truman proclamation is a ‘particular source that has secured a general following’.93 The ILC also explained how objections could prevent tacit acceptance of maritime limits and referenced the following example. Turkmenistan established baselines and territorial sea limits in 1993 and Russia protested these limits in January 1994 by means of a diplomatic note, stating that this unilateral action would not be recognised by Russia.94 According to the ILC, these protests were ‘necessary to prevent a situation whereby silence on the part of the Russian Federation could be invoked against it in the future as a tacit acceptance of or acquiescence in the claims of Turkmenistan’.95 Indeed, failure to object to potentially unlawful maritime limits can amount to acquiescence or tacit acceptance.96 Such failure can give unilateral maritime claims binding force, whereas a successful challenge would make them unenforceable. Guiding Principle 9 confirms that while ‘[n]o obligation may result for other States from the unilateral 87 ILC, ‘Report of the Commission to the General Assembly on the work of its fifty-eighth session’ (1 May-9 June and 3 July-11 August 2006) UN Doc A/CN.4/SER.A/2006/Add.1 (Part 2), para 176. 88 Ibid para 174. 89 Ibid para 176. 90 Harry S Truman, ‘150 - Proclamation 2667 - Policy of the United States with Respect to the Natural Resources of the Subsoil and Sea Bed of the Continental Shelf’ September 28, 1945. 91 Convention on the Continental Shelf (adopted 29 April 1958, entered into force 10 June 1964) 499 UNTS 311. 92 ILC, ‘Eighth report on unilateral acts of States, by Mr. Víctor Rodríguez Cedeño, Special Rapporteur’ (26 May 2005) UN Doc A/CN.4/557, paras 131-133. 93 North Sea Continental Shelf (n 6) para 100. 94 UN Doc A/CN.4/557 (n 92) paras 85-88. 95 Ibid para 94. 96 Julia Lisztwan, ‘Stability of maritime boundary agreements’ (2012) 37 Yale Journal of International Law 153, 165.
Blaðsíða 1
Blaðsíða 2
Blaðsíða 3
Blaðsíða 4
Blaðsíða 5
Blaðsíða 6
Blaðsíða 7
Blaðsíða 8
Blaðsíða 9
Blaðsíða 10
Blaðsíða 11
Blaðsíða 12
Blaðsíða 13
Blaðsíða 14
Blaðsíða 15
Blaðsíða 16
Blaðsíða 17
Blaðsíða 18
Blaðsíða 19
Blaðsíða 20
Blaðsíða 21
Blaðsíða 22
Blaðsíða 23
Blaðsíða 24
Blaðsíða 25
Blaðsíða 26
Blaðsíða 27
Blaðsíða 28
Blaðsíða 29
Blaðsíða 30
Blaðsíða 31
Blaðsíða 32
Blaðsíða 33
Blaðsíða 34
Blaðsíða 35
Blaðsíða 36
Blaðsíða 37
Blaðsíða 38
Blaðsíða 39
Blaðsíða 40
Blaðsíða 41
Blaðsíða 42
Blaðsíða 43
Blaðsíða 44
Blaðsíða 45
Blaðsíða 46
Blaðsíða 47
Blaðsíða 48
Blaðsíða 49
Blaðsíða 50
Blaðsíða 51
Blaðsíða 52
Blaðsíða 53
Blaðsíða 54
Blaðsíða 55
Blaðsíða 56
Blaðsíða 57
Blaðsíða 58
Blaðsíða 59
Blaðsíða 60
Blaðsíða 61
Blaðsíða 62
Blaðsíða 63
Blaðsíða 64
Blaðsíða 65
Blaðsíða 66
Blaðsíða 67
Blaðsíða 68
Blaðsíða 69
Blaðsíða 70
Blaðsíða 71
Blaðsíða 72
Blaðsíða 73
Blaðsíða 74
Blaðsíða 75
Blaðsíða 76
Blaðsíða 77
Blaðsíða 78
Blaðsíða 79
Blaðsíða 80
Blaðsíða 81
Blaðsíða 82
Blaðsíða 83
Blaðsíða 84
Blaðsíða 85
Blaðsíða 86
Blaðsíða 87
Blaðsíða 88
Blaðsíða 89
Blaðsíða 90
Blaðsíða 91
Blaðsíða 92
Blaðsíða 93
Blaðsíða 94
Blaðsíða 95
Blaðsíða 96
Blaðsíða 97
Blaðsíða 98
Blaðsíða 99
Blaðsíða 100
Blaðsíða 101
Blaðsíða 102
Blaðsíða 103
Blaðsíða 104
Blaðsíða 105
Blaðsíða 106
Blaðsíða 107
Blaðsíða 108
Blaðsíða 109
Blaðsíða 110
Blaðsíða 111
Blaðsíða 112
Blaðsíða 113
Blaðsíða 114
Blaðsíða 115
Blaðsíða 116
Blaðsíða 117
Blaðsíða 118
Blaðsíða 119
Blaðsíða 120
Blaðsíða 121
Blaðsíða 122
Blaðsíða 123
Blaðsíða 124
Blaðsíða 125
Blaðsíða 126
Blaðsíða 127
Blaðsíða 128
Blaðsíða 129
Blaðsíða 130
Blaðsíða 131
Blaðsíða 132
Blaðsíða 133
Blaðsíða 134
Blaðsíða 135
Blaðsíða 136
Blaðsíða 137
Blaðsíða 138
Blaðsíða 139
Blaðsíða 140
Blaðsíða 141
Blaðsíða 142
Blaðsíða 143
Blaðsíða 144
Blaðsíða 145
Blaðsíða 146
Blaðsíða 147
Blaðsíða 148
Blaðsíða 149
Blaðsíða 150
Blaðsíða 151
Blaðsíða 152
Blaðsíða 153
Blaðsíða 154
Blaðsíða 155
Blaðsíða 156
Blaðsíða 157
Blaðsíða 158
Blaðsíða 159
Blaðsíða 160
Blaðsíða 161
Blaðsíða 162
Blaðsíða 163
Blaðsíða 164
Blaðsíða 165
Blaðsíða 166
Blaðsíða 167
Blaðsíða 168
Blaðsíða 169
Blaðsíða 170
Blaðsíða 171
Blaðsíða 172
Blaðsíða 173
Blaðsíða 174
Blaðsíða 175
Blaðsíða 176
Blaðsíða 177
Blaðsíða 178
Blaðsíða 179
Blaðsíða 180
Blaðsíða 181
Blaðsíða 182
Blaðsíða 183
Blaðsíða 184
Blaðsíða 185
Blaðsíða 186
Blaðsíða 187
Blaðsíða 188
Blaðsíða 189
Blaðsíða 190
Blaðsíða 191
Blaðsíða 192
Blaðsíða 193
Blaðsíða 194
Blaðsíða 195
Blaðsíða 196
Blaðsíða 197
Blaðsíða 198
Blaðsíða 199
Blaðsíða 200
Blaðsíða 201
Blaðsíða 202
Blaðsíða 203
Blaðsíða 204
Blaðsíða 205
Blaðsíða 206
Blaðsíða 207
Blaðsíða 208
Blaðsíða 209
Blaðsíða 210
Blaðsíða 211
Blaðsíða 212
Blaðsíða 213
Blaðsíða 214
Blaðsíða 215
Blaðsíða 216
Blaðsíða 217
Blaðsíða 218
Blaðsíða 219
Blaðsíða 220
Blaðsíða 221
Blaðsíða 222
Blaðsíða 223
Blaðsíða 224

x

Helga Law Journal

Beinir tenglar

Ef þú vilt tengja á þennan titil, vinsamlegast notaðu þessa tengla:

Tengja á þennan titil: Helga Law Journal
https://timarit.is/publication/1677

Tengja á þetta tölublað:

Tengja á þessa síðu:

Tengja á þessa grein:

Vinsamlegast ekki tengja beint á myndir eða PDF skjöl á Tímarit.is þar sem slíkar slóðir geta breyst án fyrirvara. Notið slóðirnar hér fyrir ofan til að tengja á vefinn.